(Closed) Rh (D) Disease- anyone have experience?

posted 6 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 3
Member
1359 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

@MRSLMA:  I’m so sorry to hear about your miscarriage. I am also O-, and Darling Husband is a + blood type. I was told it wouldn’t be an issue, only that I need to get the Rhogam shot around 26 weeks and at birth.

Post # 4
Member
1949 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

it will only cause issues if the mother and baby’s blood types are different, and they MIX. Essentially, the mother’s body will recognize the baby as an imposeter, and attack it. but only if the blood types mix together, which usually only happens in a trama.

Women at risk typically get the Phogam shot, which (I think) introduces anitbodies into mom’s system to prevent it from attacking in the event of a blood mixture. You’ll get it around 26-28 weeks, and after birth.

I’ve never been preggers, but mom had to get the shot when she had me. i’ll likely have to get it as well, if hubby’s a pos blood type (I’m A-).

It’s not really anything to be concerned about because there is a shot available for it.

Post # 6
Member
209 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

@MRSLMA: I’m not a doctor, but I just finished my rotation for PA school in OBGYN, so I might be able to give you a little more information. Typically women that are Rh (-) will receive a rhogam shot anytime they bleed durng pregnancy. Rhogram is also given before delivery at 27 weeks and within 72 hours after birth if their child is Rh +.

Women that receive the shot within the 72 hours will NOT become sensitized. This means they have not developed antibodies against Rh + blood. If you’ve become sensitized… it can be a problem. Maternal sensitized blood can “attack” the blood of of baby in future pregnancies. 

When you become pregnant again they will draw blood and see if you’ve developed those antibodies. If you haven’t… then you will go on to just receive the regular rhogam shot and deliver. 

If you have the antibodies. The doctors will watch the levels of the antibodies. IF they get high enough the baby may not be receiving enough good blood and can become anemic. They will run a few tests and monitor the fetus weekly. If things get worse they will have to deliver you early. I don’t want to scare you becuase most patients do not have problems. But it can cause some difficulty with future pregnancies. 

If you don’t understand the disease I would advise making another appointment at your doctors and have him explain it to you. 

Post # 8
Member
209 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

@MRSLMA:  I’m not 100% sure of that answer so I would ask your doctor. I wouldn’t want to give you false information. If you get pregnant again, I would advise heading to the doctor sooner rather than later. Then can draw your blood and see if there are any antibodies. You may not even be sensitized either… You never know. :/ Sorry I wish I could help more. 

Post # 9
Member
189 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

Hello! I know alot of people have answered questions for you but I work in transfusion so may be able to shed a little more light on it (and this may get a little long)

The problem occurs when your baby is RhD positive because you are RhD negative. During pregnancy your baby’s blood can ‘leak’ into your own – normally thats not a problem as it is not enough to initiate an immune response. The problem occurs when large numbers of baby red cells cross into the maternal blood stream, usually this only occurs during labour but sometimes abdo trauma or miscarriage can cause this as well 

If your baby is RhD positive, your immune system then recognises the RhD present on the baby cells as foreign and creates antibody known as Anti-D. During a first pregnancy a larger form of anti-D is formed (known as IgM). IgM anti-D is unable to cross the placenta, so that first baby is most likely born healthy, especially if the bleed occurs later in pregnancy or at labour.

In subsequent pregnancies, if the baby is RhD positive, your immune system recognises the normal small leakage of foetal cells and ‘remembers’ the foreign RhD. Because of this, it produces Anti-D again – but this time in a form known as IgG. IgG anti-D CAN cross the placenta and thus the disease occurs (the destruction of the babies red cells, leading to a built of break down products that can lead to jaundice, anaemia etc).

In your case, due to your miscarriage, you were adminstered Rhogam. This is to mop up any foetal cells in your circulation before your body can recognise it and produce anti-D. Depending on how far along you were along at miscarriage can alter how much foetal cells actually passed into your blood stream (they may not have even be enough to cause sensitisation), and also the foetal cells may have inherited your blood group and not have caused a problem at all (it is impossible to say). The reason why Rhogam is adminstered at around 25 weeks and after delivery is because these are the key times that bleeds occur and cause sensitisation – Rhogam then covers the pregnancy from 25 weeks (it stays active for a long while) and the extra given at delivery mops up any cells from labour. Unfortunatly without performing your testing myself I cant give you any idea of whether or not you have a significant enough bleed to cause sensitisaton.

In regards to future pregnancies, any baby that inherits your blood group will have no issue at all even If you have developed anti-D. If you have developed anti-D, you will have antibody titres done to determine how Anti-D is in your blood stream as there is a cut off for safe levels. This will be checked during any future pregnancies to ensure the best outcome for you and baby.

Sadly they will be unable to check your blood currently because of the Rhogam (which will give you a false positive). Most likely, you will have to come back for a blood test at a later date to confirm whether or not you have developed Anti-D.

Wow this was long, sorry about that. Good luck talking to your doctor and in the future.

 

Post # 10
Member
1116 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2008

Just as a bit of reassurance, my bff dealt with this issue with her first pregnancy and miscarriage, but her second pregnancy a few months later went compltely smoothly.  She had to get her blood monitored at most OB appointments, but the RH factor that was being monitored didn’t increase at all over the whole pregnancy, so it ended up being a total non issue.  Hopefully it’s just as easy for you.

Post # 11
Member
2201 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@Sibiohan:  That’s a great explanation. I used to work for a blood bank (in a non-lab capacity) and one of our recipient stories was a mother and her son. She was negative and had 3 earlier pregnancies with no complications because she received the Rhogam shots, but with baby #4 she had more issues and needed to have fetal blood transfusions.

Post # 12
Member
6824 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

I am RH- and have had the shots. Apparently this runs in my family as was my grandmother was Rh- also. So OP you are not alone. 

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