(Closed) Rude, much or overreacting?

posted 5 years ago in Etiquette
Post # 17
Member
2009 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2017

View original reply
akshali2000 :  UK… ive heard some people from the south in certain circles do thank you cards (to be honest southerners do lots of strange things though imho) but up here in the north of england and in scotland ive never encountered them and when I saw them on these sites asked my friends about them and they never heard of them either (and we are based over several 100 miles in 3 different countries)

Post # 18
Member
2704 posts
Sugar bee

It’s not something I would sweat. I would be more worried about the standing of my relationship. When is your boyfriend going to be willing to introduce you to all his family and will you be accepted? 

Post # 19
Member
145 posts
Blushing bee

I would not worry about thank you card. I find the whole idea silly. 

But your BF not taking you to this wedding is a HUGE red flag in my opinion. If i were dating someone for 2 years and he kept me a secret I would be very concerned. 

Post # 21
Member
452 posts
Helper bee

This may be of some, albeit small, consolation. I was invited to a wedding a couple of years ago. The bride (in her invitation) indicated that the couple was hurting financially for their honeymoon, and would gladly accept a monetary gift in lieu of of a wedding gift from one of the registries. So, instead of buying a present, I gifted them with $100 in a card. Never received a thank you card to this day. Oh well . . . I made a much-needed contribution and I guess that’s what mattered in the end.

Post # 22
Member
5521 posts
Bee Keeper

View original reply
btob17 :  UK bee. Everyone I know writes thank you cards, and not just for weddings: for any gift, for any occasion. And I know people from all over the country. 

View original reply
akshali2000 :  yes, it was rude; as was withdrawing the invitation. I would be peeved. I was actually peeved recently as, though we did receive a thank you from this one couple, it was pre-printed. My parents, who attended the evening reception, never received one at all, and we’re left wondering if the couple actually received their gift. 

We were tardy getting ours out, but they all went out within 6-8 weeks. The reason for the delay is we wanted to send photos to people (not of us, of them) with the thank yous, but in the end had to post them and send the photos with our Christmas cards as we were getting late. 

Post # 23
Member
2009 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2017

View original reply
barbie86 :  if you go back to the regonal ettiquette thing you see pretty much all uk bees said this wasnt a uk thing… I know from my personal experiance and those ive talk to its definately not something we have ever experianced

Post # 24
Member
5521 posts
Bee Keeper

View original reply
btob17 :  as I said, most I know send thank you cards,as that is the correct think to do. Does that mean everyone in the UK does? Of course not. But it is correct etiquette, whether you personally happen to do it or not. I was always brought up to hand write them for birthday and Christmas presents, as were all my friends. I’m from the London area, but know people from all over the country (Newcastle, Yorkshire, Manchester) including Scotland, and those who don’t ‘do’ them are the exception, not the rule. It could well be generational or class-related (though I would consider myself very much working class), but to suggest it is not the ‘done thing’ in the UK just because you don’t do it is, frankly, ridiculous. 

Post # 25
Member
2009 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2017

View original reply
barbie86 :  ok, everyone else is lying… also great way to look down your nose on anyone, ettiquette is regonal so there is NO such thing as ‘correct’ undecided your way does not have to the the ‘right’ way and personally I find thank you letters immature and irrasponsible (different folk, different view)

The topic ‘Rude, much or overreacting?’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors