(Closed) RUNNERS – I need your help

posted 6 years ago in Fitness
Post # 3
Member
5001 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

First of all, you don’t need salt. You really don’t need nutrition unless you’re running for more than 90 minutes. It’s likely your shoes or you are running too fast/far. What kind of shoes are you wearing? Were you fitted at a specialty running store? How fast and how much (how far on each run and how many miles/week?) do you usually run?

Post # 4
Member
1855 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Is this a new pain or something that has been constant/on-and-off since you’ve been running?  Does anything make it better (rest, elevation, ice, warmth, etc)?  If it’s a new pain, then it’s not going to be your shoes (unless you’ve changed shoes really recently or unless your shoes are worn out and need replacing).  You probably landed wrong and strained a muscle during a run, or even during your daily activities, and then the run exacerbated it.  I’d take some advil (or other anti-inflammatory), rest the leg, and stay off the road until you can walk comfortably with no pain.  Stabilizing the foot/ankle with a wrap/brace might be necessary if you’re really having discomfort with walking/climbing stairs.

Post # 6
Member
5475 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

Did you go to a specialty store and get fitted for your shoes?  They should be able to look at your foot, how your foot strikes the ground, and how you roll through to assess your stride & suggest a shoe that works for you.

When you run, where does your leading foot land?  In front of you?  Under you?  What part of your foot hits the ground first?  Your heel?  Your mid-foot?  The ball of your foot?

As for warming up and stretching… yes keep doing that.  Stretch ALL of your calf muscle.  I had a bit of pain when I started back up (took some post marathon recovery time!) and even dangling my heel off the step & leaning against a wall with my leg extended behind me wouldn’t stretch out my calf 🙁  I ended up sitting on the ground and actually pulling my toes up toward my shin to get a good stretch.  The pain subsided after about 2 weeks. 

Post # 8
Member
5475 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

I found an article that was posted to our marathon training page & thought this excerpt might be helpful to you:

It’s from “Why Running Form Matters: And how you can improve your form” by Scott Douglas

Are You Overstriding?

There’s a difference between overstriding and having a long stride. Overstriding means that your feet land significantly in front of your center of gravity. When this happens, you’re unable to make full use of your fitness, because you’re braking with every step. And you might soon be breaking with every step, in that overstriding amplifies the already-strong impact forces of running and therefore can contribute to more strain on your bones, muscles and ligaments.

Coach Roy Benson suggests these two methods of determining if you’re overstriding.

1. Have a friend with a video camera stand 20 yards back from the side of a level surface. Run past your friend for 30-40 yards at an easy pace. Then run past at around 10K race pace. Finally, run past at a near sprint. Says Benson, “When you watch yourself, even though you might not be able to stop action and analyze it at that level, just by seeing your form you can recognize whether you’re overstriding. As long as your knee is bent and your foot is coming down back underneath you or close to you there’s probably not much inefficiency and not much risk.”

2. Have a friend stand in front of you while you run toward her at the three effort levels in the above exercise. Says Benson, “The friend looks to see how much of the sole of your shoe is showing on impact. If there’s 4, 5, 6 inches of daylight between your toe and the ground when your heel hits, you’re overstriding.”

The three effort levels are important, Benson explains, because many runners, especially those without a background in scholastic running, become overstriders only when they try to go faster.

To improve a tendency to overstride, practice running fast while landing over your center of gravity. This is often best done by going to a field or other safe, soft surface and shedding your shoes. Says Benson, “At first, jog in place. You’ll be landing on the ball of your foot. That’s what it feels like to be a midfoot striker. Now stay up there and jog in place and lean over and slowly accelerate over the next 50 yards or so and don’t go so fast that you forget to stay up there and land on the ball of your foot. When you do them right, strides like these are fast enough to be a good way to teach midfoot strike.” Then stay conscious of what that footstrike feels like when you do track workouts and other faster sessions.”

Post # 10
Member
5475 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

@WillyNilly:  You bet chica!  I’ve been running a long time.  May as well share some of the tips I’ve picked up along the way 🙂

Post # 11
Member
1040 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2010

@WillyNilly:  I just started running about a month ago, and had this problem SO badly. Honestly, I think I could run for half a km before it got so painful I had to stop. Like previous posters have said, stretching and calf strengthening exercises will be your best friend. I stand on a stair with my heels hanging over the edge, and press my heels toward the ground. 

Also, I changed my stride to a bit more of a shuffle, because I suspected I was landing on my heels really hard. This seemed to help as well.

Hope your problem gets better soon!

Post # 13
Member
228 posts
Helper bee

I don’t run very much, but I do martial arts and have had to deal with a lot of the associated injuries.  What kind of stretching are you doing before you run?  In general, I found that doing gentle dynamic stretching before working out helps a lot in injury prevention.  Don’t do static stretching beforehand, but definitely do it afterwards (I would say at least 10-20 minutes of different stretches afterwards).  The reason for this is because dynamic stretching both stretches and helps warm the muscles in the way you’ll be using them during the run, while cold static stretching can actually prevent you from stretching to your maximum even when fully warmed up.  I found this guide for dynamic stretching for runners:

http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-241-287–13442-0,00.html

If the pain feel like cramping, this could be a sign of dehydration, so I would make sure you slowly hydrate yourself starting an hour or so before the run (so you don’t have a stomach full of water by the time you’re ready to start).  I also found that drinking gatorade or diluted gatorade works better than plain water for me.

It may also help to take an anti-inflammatory after your run (since the hours right after an injury, your body sometimes goes overboard trying to heal it and it can actually make the process slower) and massage the area every day to increase blood flow until your calves heal.

Post # 15
Member
2401 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

@WillyNilly:  Do you walk before you run? I had hip and calf issues and I found that if I walked at a moderate tempo for about 10-15 minutes (in my running shoes) before I ran, it certainly helped more than stretching.

Also, do you do yoga or swim frequently? I read an article a year ago about how doing yoga or swimming, while wonderful, will effect the muscles in your ankle, shins, and hips in a negative way for running. Try weight lifting, squats, and lunges to strengthen your lower body.

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