Running down to the courthouse for FAFSA???

posted 2 years ago in Beehive
Post # 16
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9127 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

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Sansa85 :  Exactly. It’s the same thing with car insurance – my mom had a sports car and the company said they had so many issues with parents buying fast cars for their kids while claiming themselves as the primary driver that their new rule was that the kid was either insured for the sports car as a primary driver or we had to sign a form stating that the kid would never drive the sports car and if they did any accidents wouldn’t be covered. 

Post # 17
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3074 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: January 2021

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Sansa85 :  I graduated 7 years ago haha so hopefully this advice/information can be useful to somone else but it’s a bit late for me, unfortunately.

Post # 18
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1065 posts
Bumble bee

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brideandblue :  honestly, I don’t know if it’s worth it. When I was going to school and working full time I made $45,000 per year and didn’t get any financial aid. I was able to take out loans but didn’t receive any financial aid whatsoever from FAFSA. Scholarships are definitely the way to go. If you apply for 100, which was what I did, you’ll get at least a few thousand dollars to help with books and tuition. 

Post # 19
Member
9127 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

It’s been a long time for me so someone correct me if I’m wrong – but your school uses the FAFSA to decide what private scholarships they may want to offer you too, correct? So it’s more than just federal dollars. My mom made more than many of you are saying here back in the early aughts and I still got a mix of need-based and merit based scholarships directly from my university. 

Post # 20
Member
1391 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2020

We got married early for FAFSA, no regrets. However, I don’t think you’ll get much aid anyway with 69k a year. Of course, that depends on the living cost of your area and the cost of the school you’re looking at attending.

If you do decide to get married early, you should do so before the end of the year, because you can get a lot of tax benefits for the upcoming season. 

Post # 21
Member
786 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2018

I think the only thing FAFSA is good for is if you have like 7 kids. 

Post # 22
Member
786 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2018

We did FAFSA from 2011-2017 for my sister and I.

When I was applying as a junior, Dad was making $70K in the military to support Mom, me and my sister. Sister was enrolling as a freshman in college. I was in College Station, Dad was in semi-permanent in Kansas finishing up a job and my Mom and sister moved to Houston. 70K split amongst 3 addresses and 2 sets of tuition.

FAFSA said we could kick in $13K and we didn’t qualify for grants or other government aid. That other $27k+ for that year was covered by scholarships that we had to work hard for.

Post # 23
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2558 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2016

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Shesaidyes :  I guess im wondering how they enforce that parents support their adult kids through university, etc? What if the adult child decides to go to an expensive school with expensive room & board? Im having trouble envisioning how how this is enforced to any great measure…. legally, they’re adults, right? 

Post # 24
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1716 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2018

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jannigirl :  Here in Germany, every young adult has a right to financial aid for their first training based on need. (child support until the end of your first education)  So the state requires income information from your parents when you apply. If your parents to not fill out the paperwork you are encouraged and supported to seek legal means to enforce the financial support your parents owe you. Parents can not simply say “I’m not gonna do it” and in fact, socially it’s extremely frowned upon. I do know of cases where children sued the parents for support and obviously, the parents were court ordered to contribute. 

Btw, also the law goes in the opoisite direction: if your parents become financially dependant on the state, you as an adult child are also financially responsible for them as well. Also if your parents in old age require a nursing home: you must financially contribute to this. That is the social contract of a the society here. (there are exceptions: if you are a child of abuse, abandonment etc there are exceptions which can be applied for)  

To answer you question about “choosing an expensive school” : 1) higher education and basic trades training (when not a paid training in the industries)  is free. If you want to go to a private university (of which there are a few) or private training you can, but it is not a financial obligation your parents are responsible for.  2) the financial support required from your parents is based on their income and capped. Parents are required to pay for you basically like child support. They can pay more if they choose, however. Usually parents pay from about 300-600 a month. 3) the difference between what your parents can afford and your actual financial need is then provided from the state as a monthly stipend which at some point after graduation must be repaid (with no interest I believe and there are plenty of ways to delay paying back if you are continuing education or underemployed. Also the repay rates are very reasonable) 

I should add I pay probably over 20% of my income in taxes. Because ensuring social equality is not free and education should not be a luxury. They do not try to profit off of educating the society here. So we all pay the damn taxes and enjoy our lives. 

Post # 26
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1716 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2018

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chocolateplease : I was (before I married)  low income, so 20% in taxes was a hard for me. A lot of people do pay more. I was just in the lowest tax bracket. (I think those with my earnings pay about 10% in the states) 

Obviously people in the US have different tax brackets. (as in you paying 30%) 

With your tax bracket you would pay roughly similar (+about 10% more) here. 

I don’t understand what your point is. 

Post # 27
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1614 posts
Bumble bee

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Shesaidyes :  what’s with the hostility?

 

You say:

“I should add I pay probably over 20% of my income in taxes. Because ensuring social equality is not free and education should not be a luxury. They do not try to profit off of educating the society here. So we all pay the damn taxes and enjoy our lives.”

So you at least insinuate that you pay “all the damn taxes” as you do in order for “ensuring social equality” and my clarifying point to you in your critiquing of US education/social policy is that many Americans already DO pay a lot of tax, much of which goes towards programs they and their loved ones do not directly benefit from, so to insinuate that we don’t give our hard earned cash to some societal betterment is false and a mischaracterization.

I don’t want to pay more tax to the government than I already do. That won’t change no matter what tax bracket I am in. 

Post # 28
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1716 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2018

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chocolateplease : “…many Americans already DO pay a lot of tax, much of which goes towards programs they and their loved ones do not directly benefit from, so to insinuate that we don’t give our hard earned cash to some societal betterment is false and a mischaracterization.”

 Parden me if I insinuated that most people in the US are absolutely appalled by the idea that things like education,  infrastructure and healthcare should come from taxes in a quite straightforward way.  All I read about is how taxes should be lowered, lowered, lowered. The impression is, that most average americans feel like they pay too much taxes. Also it would seem that many americans feel they shouldn pay for services and institutions they feel they personally do not directly benefit from. (even though it is proven that such services beneifit society as whole: as in, I may not have college student children, but I benefit from a highly educated society)  So you are saying this is not the case? You mean this is a mis-representation?

Yeah, we would also love to pay less taxes here, but we also see how we (as individuals and also as a society) profit from taxes and understand it as a ncessary thing. But, yeah, that is just as long as you can see where the taxes are going to. 

I will correct my statement and share your anger: isn’t it shocking that many people pay so much taxes (you and assumingly others as well) and the country is still falling apart in infrastructure, healthcare and education? Doens’t this make you angry?

Post # 29
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1614 posts
Bumble bee

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Shesaidyes :  sorry, I dont agree with your impression of the US or Americans. Our country is hardly “falling apart”. Are there areas that need improvement? Yes, of course. No country is perfect. But to blame it on a lack of money and saying that more money would magically fix the problems you tick off is just simplifying a complex problem.

More efficiency and better transparency is needed in most areas so ppl can hold their govt and elected officials and their bureaucrats and the red tape they create responsible for the people’s money that is mishandled and misspent. Bc yes, the people deserve to see their hard earned cash at work for them. Why is that wrong? I should just *trust* the govt to do what is right without oversight? Not a fat chance.

To act like the sky is falling in the US for all is quite an exaggeration.  I am a first generation American and without the opportunity afforded by this country for my family, who worked their asses off without handouts, I would be very poor and uneducated, living a life many would not wish for. I won’t bash the US with you. Sorry. There’s room for improvement for sure, but saddling the blame on hardworking Americans is misguided. 

Post # 30
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9127 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

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Shesaidyes :  I’m also in the US and many of us are fine with our taxes and would even happily pay more if it went to thinks like universal education and healthcare and infrastructure. But I pay tens of thousands of dollars every year for the first family to make themselves richer and a military industrial complex that makes contractors rich while servicemembers struggle to take care of their families and that pisses me off. 

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