Running outside vs inside – advice needed

posted 1 year ago in Fitness
Post # 2
Member
335 posts
Helper bee

View original reply
mel2 :  Two things that help me.  Run somewhere pretty/interesting.  When I run in the suburbs with just row after row of matching houses, I get board.  Find a park, interesting commercial area or other scenic route.  I’ve found it worth it to drive a few minutes to a park, board walk or ocean to have a more interesting run.

Have you tried audiobooks.  I get light fluffy books or thrillers and listen to them while I run.  If the book is interesting, I find the hours fly by.  I also am only ‘allowed’ to listen to the book while running.  So if I want to know what happened, I’ve got to put on my running shoes.  🙂  Podcasts are too short too keep me engrossed, and I get bored with music.

Also get some sort of timing device that speaks to u through your headphones.  Listen to auditory cues and dont look at ur phone.

Finally, try to start out slow.  Running outdoors is harder than the treadmill.  I find I’m better keeping my pace slower at the beginning and speeding up to the end if I’m not too tired.  

Post # 3
Member
7359 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2012

Running outside is definitely harder because you aren’t setting your pace like on the treadmill. You just need to get some great music, or a podcast, to help keep you interested and take your mind off of things. Also I second the idea of running somewhere interesting as opposed to a neighborhood where you’re just watching houses go by.

Post # 4
Member
754 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2018

I’m thankful enough to live on a paved, rural road with nice views no matter what and I can say that helps keep me intruiged A LOT. So I 2nd finding a place with a different view. Perhaps just a park but run the path different every day/week, etc? 

Also, try doing the couch to 5k or maybe a more advanced version of it to get your body adjusted. Or run/jog until you notice you’re tiring but not completely dead and then walk for 30 seconds – 1 min to catch your breath and repeat until you build your stamina and can run for longer and eventually not walk. 

Post # 5
Member
5422 posts
Bee Keeper

I have asthma too. When I did run outside I’d do a minute on a minute off to build up resistance in my lungs.  

Second. I would take my albuterol before a run per my doctor so ask your doc if that could work for you. 

Third if your asthma is allergic asthma as well as exercise induced dienload a pollen count app. You can look at the pollen count and what the predominant pollens are for the day. Certain ones I won’t even walk outside. 

And alwayssssss have your rescue inhaler and a cell phone with you. 

 

Post # 6
Member
1431 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2019 - City, State

Running outside is quite literally harder because on a treadmill you don’t have to propel yourself forward at all.  I would advise working up to longer running times/distances outside just the way that you did on a treadmill.  It’s a whole different ballgame and as you mentioned, you’ll have to pace yourself more carefully, listen to your body more closely, and sort of “re-learn” how to run.  Running indoors really doesn’t translate to running outdoors as easily as you might think.

Post # 7
Member
16 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: July 2009

The transition from indoor/treadmill running to outdoor running was tough for me, too.  I really struggled with pacing myself and not being able to control the environment the way I could on the treadmill. 

The game-changer for me was getting a Garmin running watch.  Being able to see my real-time pace, distance, splits, etc. made all the difference for me and helped me feel in control.  Have you considered something along those lines?

Another piece of advice – you mentioned that you did the C25K program (So did I!  It was great!), but did you actually run a race?  I highly recommend running a 5K and 10K as part of your half-marathon training (find one that corresponds with a week you’re running 3mi/6mi, respectively).  Running in a race environment is very different, and while it’s super fun, it does take some getting used to!

Post # 9
Member
16 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: July 2009

Perfect!  I think you’re totally on the right track.  If you’re already signed up for an 8K & 10K, you probably don’t need to worry about the 5K . . . but, then again, races are fun & medals are the best!

I got my Garmin (Forerunner 235) refurbished on Amazon – it was still a bit of an investment, but quite a savings compared to buying brand new.  I’ve had it for nearly 2 years and it still works 100% perfectly!

Post # 10
Member
2230 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: March 2019

I agree with PP about an interesting place. Look up some good running trails. I personally find it easier to keep going if I am with people or if people are around. It’s the shame factor in stopping! And running outside is a lot harder. There are more level variations and you have to propel yourself forward. Do like you did to start, go for a while and walk for a while. Work up to it! I find it really easy to run with my girlfriends because we can talk and run and we always run somewhere interesting! We also run a mile or two stop and do a HIIT workout and then run the mile or two back home. Or we run to a yoga class (this made it really easy to keep going, becuase we had to get to class on time!), do yoga and run or walk home. 

Post # 11
Member
2474 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

Regarding gear: If you are not quite ready to commit to a Garmin or other fittness watch, maybe try dowloading an app on your phone. I had a Garmin (Forerunner 310xt, way old school) for many years, but it was a bit of a hassle to upload my data. Now, I use Strava to track my runs and other workouts and it’s really straight forward. If you have a smartphone, I recommend the Strava app, especially if you already are used to carrying your phone with you when you run.  

Also, I’ll echo what other PP have stated: the transition from treadmill running to road running is not as seamless as it appears. Take it slow and give yourself time to adjust to the new conditions; maybe start with a 35 minute road run, then slowly increase to 1 hour runs. Start your run at a comfortable pace, then give yourself 1 mile to get settled into it. Check your stats one mile in so you can adjust your speed as needed. Be mindful of potential silent injuries (shin splints, joint pain, sore feet) that come with running on asphat, concrete, blacktop, and other hard surfaces; the treadmill is much more forgiving. Good luck and have fun! 

Post # 12
Member
10540 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2016

I’m a new runner doing my first half in September as well! I run both inside and outside. I do think it helps to mix up where I run so I at least get something new to look at.

I use the app RunKeeper (I have an iPhone, idk if it’s available on Android) on my outdoor runs to keep track of my time and pace and distance. It does help to know how far I’ve gone and know my average pace.

Also, I do have to remind myself that my only goal for this half is to finish. The time doesn’t matter. Walking a bit doesn’t matter. The distance is the only thing I worry about. I actually got that advice from my dad who is a very experienced runner (has done the Boston marathon, he’s even done a couple ultras). He told me not to worry about other goals until future races.

Post # 14
Member
2474 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

View original reply
mel2 :  Awesome job, OP! Running with a buddy is great motivation. Stay focused and enjoy the fresh air. Just a couple of reminders:

-Be mindful of your mileage and be sure to schedule rest days to allow for recovery and help prevent injuries

-Don’t get discouraged if you miss a day or two; life happens, get back to your running schedule when you can

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