(Closed) SAHMs: Educating baby

posted 7 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

Maybe it would help to read a book on child development and/or early childhood education?  My daycare provider uses a preschool program geared toward kids aged 3-5 (I think it’s called Home Preschool or Homeschool Preschool), but she recommends this book to parents with infants and toddlers.  I haven’t started it yet, but hopefully I’ll have time to read it over Christmas.

With infants, our daycare mainly focuses on giving them lots of touch, interaction, and inclusion in the scheduled activities.  Babies under one are held or worn most of the day (except while baby is sleeping), and all needs are met on demand.  The adults and older children read, sing, and play finger games with the babies while they’re awake .  They try to take all the children outside every day (except when really cold or snowy) and they do some physical activities with them (e.g. tummy time, dancing/moving to music, etc…) every day.  Thjey also introduce them to a lot of different textures and sensations, as well.  

The most important thing, I think, is just that the babies are included in everything.  There aren’t seperate activities for older children versus babies, so if it’s art time, all the kids are doing the art project, with various levels of help from the adults.  During music time and circle time (stories/songs), the babies are held and helped to participate. 

Post # 5
Member
562 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

This might be something you already do, but reading is so important. It’s never too early to begin! You can even simplify it and “talk” about the pictures rather than read the story word for word.

Post # 6
Member
2344 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

I hope to be a Stay-At-Home Mom or WAHM, but I will probably start sending our LOs to some kind of mommy’s day out or preschool with an emphasis on education a couple days a week starting at 6 months or so. Not only is it a worthwhile break for mamas, I think the interaction with kids of different ages as Mrs. Spring said is really great for their development. 

Post # 7
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

@eurekaanchovies:  Yeah, I’m expecting to get more out of the book for the toddler years, than I would have for the infant time period.  To be honest, I think you’re probably doing the most important things you can be doing at this stage in the game.  🙂  Talking to her, touching her, attending to her needs and building her sense of security and attachment are the biggest developmental activities you can do with her right now.  You’re already on the ball there!

Post # 8
Member
4755 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

All the smart kids I’ve come across are so simply “talked to”. I talk to him/ her all the time. I tell him/ her what I’m doing, all the time. I show the baby “what’s this, then I explain what it is, tell him/ her how I’m going to use the object, repeating the objects name, and re explaining why and how I’m using it.”

My advice: talk, keep talking, always talk, and never stop.

Post # 10
Member
562 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

The U.S. Department of Education has a great PDF about activities that encourage language growth. It’s called “Helping Your Preschool Child” but it starts at infancy. I am studying speech-language pathology, and I have used this resource many times in various classes. Some of it is just repetitive from what was said on this board, but it really would be a great resource to have throughout the years as a Stay-At-Home Mom. I plan to keep it and get ideas from it once I have kids of my own.

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