(Closed) Seperate invitations for grown men unmarried and living at home?

posted 7 years ago in Etiquette
Post # 4
Member
44 posts
Newbee

Wondering the same thing (except mine are female AND male). I’m just going to send out one invite per HOUSEHOLD, as is customary (unless they’re invited with a plus one, in which case I would send two separate). I can’t imagine anyone being offended by that!

Post # 5
Member
2889 posts
Sugar bee

How close are you to said cousins? I had one male cousin, 30 who also lives at home and is single. We are not so close and whenever I get a birthday or Christmas card from his parents, his name is on the same card. Therefore, I didn’t think it would be offensive to invite him on their invitation. I did give my 20 year old brother who is also single and living at home his own invitation though because I wanted him to feel he was included as an individual, not a child. I guess you could go either way if he is not being invited with a guest.

Post # 6
Member
374 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

My personal rule of thumb (and you can take this or leave it.. maybe i’m just a big spender, i don’t know) is to send an invitation to whoever gets their own place card. So for an example i’ll use my engagement party. I had a great aunt and two of her sons (late 30’s possibly even 40’s) that live together and they all all got their own invitations. Great Aunt alone and the two sons with guest each.My Future Mother-In-Law insisted I send her nephew’s invite with his parents because he still lives with them (he’s 30) so I did what she wanted but for the wedding everyone who has a place card gets their own invite. Just a side note, I’m not having children at my wedding minus first cousins, i have an enormous family

Post # 8
Member
374 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

I don’t think it matters that you’re not inviting them with a guest. Like you said it’s two more invites. They’re in their 30s. Might as well send them separate invites.

Post # 9
Member
1488 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2012

We have a couple friends who just graduated college and they either never moved out or just moved back home because they couldn’t find a job and we send separate invitations to them if we also invited their parents. We felt the same as you in not wanting them to feel like kids. We figured, it was only 3-4 more invitations, we already ordered extras so might as well.

Post # 10
Member
3267 posts
Sugar bee

Etiquette states that each single adult or couple receive their own invitation, regardless of where they live.

Children are only included on an adults invitation if they are younger then 18.

 

Post # 11
Member
2580 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

We actually have this exact same scenario, and while I think technically they should be receiving separate invitations, my mom (our calligrapher) put them on one. I think we were running a little short on invitations, and she didn’t think that he would be offended. I believe the proper etiquette would be to send two, but I don’t think most people would be outraged to receive one per household, as that seems like a more common sense solution.

Post # 13
Member
1474 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

I’m in the same situation, but I decided to do separate invitations.

Post # 14
Member
133 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

According to the etiquette books I’ve read, you are supposed to send separate invitations to anyone over the age of 18, living at home or not. Especially at their age, I would send them each their own invitation. We chose to send indiviual invitations to anyone 21 years or older, and I feel bad a little that those 18-20 didn’t get their own.

Post # 15
Member
1205 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

We’re sending separate invitations in a similar case–I have a few cousins (and even a friend) who are adults but living at home. All will receive their own invites.

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