(Closed) Sewing Advice

posted 9 years ago in DIY
Post # 3
Member
241 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2009 - University of Michigan Union

I don’t think that you should buy a size down; after removing the zipper you may need to finish the edges on each side, which will create room for the ribbon lacing. Also, ribbon for the lacing is fine, but ribbon is not strong enough to use for the loops. You should try to find thin cording to use for that application, it will be more sturdy, and easier to sew with.

If you are nervous, I would shop the idea around to some tailoring shops- it may be an inexpensive alteration!

Post # 5
Member
37 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: June 2009

Ive never done anything like this before and i would be too nervous to try!  lol!  But if you’re up for the challenge, then go for it.  But I was told when I bought my dress that they could turn any dress into a corset lace up back.  I want to say they said it would cost around $100 to have this done.  It may be something to check into.

Post # 6
Member
68 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: June 2008

I had to do this exact same thing, but not because I wanted, but because the dress didn’t fit.  One of my bridesmaid’s dresses came in and was about three sizes too small.  There wasn’t time to get a different dress, nor was there enough material in the seams to just alter it.  We ended up taking the zipper out, adding some loops on each side and then lacing it up.  It worked beautifully!  I did it myself, but I have been sewing for years, so this wasn’t a huge undertaking for me.  If you haven’t sewn a lot I would *personally* take it to a professional seamstress and have them look at it, making sure that it would be possible to do.  Depending on the construction on the dress, it might be more difficult to do, but probably still possible.

Good luck with your project, whatever you decide to do!!

Post # 7
Member
92 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: August 2008

Just out of curiosity…did you look around for what you actually want in a dress?  It might be a better – or less stressful and expensive – option to keep looking to find the shape of the dress you want, but with the corset back.  I know Alfred Angelo has MANY dresses that cost under $500 and their prices for alterations seemed reasonable, too.  This may not be anything close to what you want, but it is strapless, simple, and with a corset back: http://www.alfredangelo.com/Collections/ProductDisplay.aspx?productID=4eace2ce-e0e2-4343-bd97-48d2dbbffb32&categoryID=32e5a88c-cbf1-498f-afcf-dbfca138c5d3&pg=0 Maybe you could get it without the sash thing on the back? 

Post # 9
Member
68 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: June 2008

I did it by hand, but that’s because I have a tendency to lose focus when I use a machine, and then my work ends up looking sloppy.  I probably could have used a machine if I would have been careful, but I knew that my end result would have been better for me if I sewed it by hand.

For the loops I used material that matched the dress (a light satin) and sewed them into little strips.  This ended up being the biggest pain of all because, since I used a machine for this, it kept snagging.

Keep us posted!

Post # 10
Member
241 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2009 - University of Michigan Union

You may actually be able to find some pre made shaped loop tape, just as they have hook and eye tape and snap tape. I would secure the loops by hand stitching, leave those stitches in then go over it with a machine. Just as the loop material needs to be strong enough, the stitches should be reinforced so you don’t have any surprises when you are wearing it.

Check out this link:

http://www.denverfabrics.com/pages/sewinginfo/hsc-sewing-hints/sewing-buttonloops.htm

Just ignore the fact that the loops are for buttons, and use the ribbon instead. 🙂 

Post # 12
Member
2292 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2008

An actual corset-back design also has an fabric inlay; the dress is laced over the inlay so that you don’t have a bunch of bare back showing, and so that the lacing can be wider at the top (generally laced so that there is about 3 – 4 inches of the underlay showing) – this is what allows you to really appreciate the lacing. If you think about it, it’s sort of what it looks like when you lace up a shoe – you want that “tongue” there, or you don’t see the lacing at all. You do want the fabric to meet at the bottom of the laces, where you tie the bow. So the actually opening is v-shaped, not at all like the space where the zipper went.

I actually sew quite a bit, and I really wouldn’t try this on my own – at least not with my own wedding dress. Particularly since if you don’t anchor the loops, or sew the edges correctly, it will tend to tear out if you lace it too tight. It is a common alteration though, so you ought to be able to consult a seamstress and get an estimate if you like.

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