(Closed) Sex offender app…

posted 7 years ago in The Lounge
Post # 18
Member
646 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

When we bought our home, I checked online and our street was clear. I recently checked again, and the man across the street has a rape offense now, so it must have been in the past few years.

I basically had a nervous breakdown and told DH we have to move. He was like, “……okay, if you don’t feel safe, let’s look into it.” Then I called my BFF and she walked me through all of these things:

-if we sell our house and move, a sex offender could still move in next door in our new neighborhood.

-there are plenty of dangerous people who are never booked (this doesn’t reassure me, but made me realize the false security in moving)

-and we don’t know what happened. it’d be stupid and naive to pretend he didn’t actually commit the crime, it is also a possibility. 

She also made me promise I wouldn’t tell her if any registered sex offenders live on her street, and she’d rather not know.

Also, now the neighbor’s house is on the market which is cool with me (although he was a perfectly nice and normal neighbor, which made me feel even creepier when I saw the charges).

And side note, I live on the same street as an elementary school, so I assumed when we bought the house we’d be safe from this. WRONGGG.

Post # 19
Member
7976 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

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@Laurenskii:  When I was a teenager my country went through a period of about six months when we all seemed to be obsessed with sex offenders. People got beaten up because of rumours, and in one memorable case then a paediatrician’s office was smashed up (ie the gangs were also illiterate, apparently). I don’t even know how it started, but people just went nuts.

I learned then that people are very stupid once you get them in groups. They have a gang mentality, and don’t tend to place their trust in the criminal justice system.

Anyway, that’s just my two cents, and that’s what worries me about this type of thing. It’s going to be a controversial topic no matter how you discuss it, however. I appreciate that.

Post # 20
Member
467 posts
Helper bee

Apparently, someone was murdered in the apartment next to ours a few decades ago.  (Our neighborhood used to be really rough, but has hipsterfied.)  There are still way more sex offenders in our area than I would like (and I’m fairly certain they are the real ones).  I just try to ignore it.  When I looked it up, I freaked the f out!  I live across from a school, where sex offenders can’t live, so I’ve decided I’m safe anyway.  I just can’t go on other streets! 🙂

Post # 21
Member
7367 posts
Busy Beekeeper

These people have always been in society and I don’t think an app like this would make me feel safer frankly. I don’t have any young children but perhaps if I did I’d care more. I once did a search in my neighborhood and got a ton of flags. But I really don’t give it a second thought. 

Post # 22
Member
1532 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: City, State

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@Laurenskii:  Just something else to think of: the offenders on your app are the ones who are currently following the law and registering with the city in which they live. I’m sure there are many more in violation of probation who don’t register.

Post # 23
Member
295 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2014

I don’t like the idea of this. While I understand that people want to feel protected, I don’t think it’s right to encroach on the civil liberties of someone who peed in public or had consenting sex with a person who was younger than them. I also think that once people have served their time for crimes committed, they should no longer be persecuted unless they present themselves as a current threat to society. 

Granted, I have never been assaulted, but I just hope that people realise the most dangerous sex offenders are the ones flying under the radar without a record.

Post # 24
Member
6738 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2014

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@Bearimbolo:  Peeing in public, streaking, those types of offenses aren’t sex offender offenses. And someone’s convictions is public information anyway. And, it’s not consensual if the person is too young to consent!

Post # 25
Member
2959 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013 - Wynn Las Vegas

Whoa photos and everything.

Post # 26
Member
295 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2014

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@futuremrsk18:  I’m not from the US so I don’t know your laws, however I believe it’s technically statutory rape if a person of 18 or older has sex with a person who is 16 or 17, which is the age of consent in Australia. 

Post # 27
Member
7976 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

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@futuremrsk18:  “it’s not consensual if the person is too young to consent!”

You say this… but I had a friend growing up. She was a model, and could pass for a much older teenager. We would regularly go to nightclubs together. She met an 18 year old boy there and told him she was also 18. They started a sexual relationship. It was only when she had a pregnancy scare that her parents found out about the relationship, called him up, and told him she was only 15 and that they wanted to call the police. Apparently he practically fainted.

Luckily they did not call the police in the end, but my friend was not taken advantage of by this boy. She wasn’t exactly a virgin when they got together, and he wasn’t psychic… how was he to know she wasn’t 18 if she had told him otherwise?

That’s the problem with these blanket offences. They don’t discriminate between bad guys and unlucky/naive guys.

Post # 28
Member
6738 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2014

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@Bearimbolo:  it depends on the state, but it’s not consensual because the person isn’t old enough to consent. A lot of states have not just ages but an age difference (like in NY, there are 3 stat rape laws – over 21 sex w/ under 17 / over 18 sex w/ under 15 / over 18 sex w/ under 11 or under 13).

This can break it down for you:

http://www.cga.ct.gov/2003/olrdata/jud/rpt/2003-r-0376.htm

My point is, statutory rape laws are in effect because the person is so young, they cannot consent. Just because they say yes, doesn’t mean the older person isn’t taking advantage of their young age.

And a lot of times people don’t end up on the sex offender registry just off their first offense. It might be their 2nd, 3rd, etc. It might be that they had been given chances before and made it clear that they cannot stay away from young girls or whatever.

Post # 29
Member
6738 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2014

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@Rachel631:  No, but that’s what prosecutors and defense attorneys and judges are for. Not everyone automatically gets the sex offender registry.

Post # 30
Member
413 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

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@Laurenskii:  i just dl the app. its apalling. there are at least 10 men within walking distance from my house who raped 6 and 8 yr old. sickening!

Post # 31
Member
295 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2014

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@futuremrsk18:  As I said, I’m not from the US so I don’t know your laws. In Australia, the age of consent is 16 or 17 depending on the state, and it doesn’t change depending on the he age of the other person. So my point is that it’s possible to be charged with statutory rape of someone who is of the age of consent. I’m not going to sit here and argue about it all day because laws in Australia and the US are not the same.

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