(Closed) Share your breastfeeding experience

posted 5 years ago in Parenting
Post # 3
Member
676 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

My son is 4 now but I breast fed him for his entire first year, he has never had a drop of formula. I will say it is not easy it takes a lot of patience and commitment. It took me a few days to get the hang of it but one visit with the lactation nurse on my last day in the hospital changed that so I would definitely recommend speaking to one while you are in the hospital. I did also start back at work about 5 weeks after my son was born which was difficult. I found having to pump was the most difficult thing, it would take me like 20min with the pump to get the same amount of milk that my son could get out in 5 min. It was a terribly difficult process to stick to breastfeeding but I was determined. My son also got teeth at 2 1/2 months, which was not fun those baby teeth are sharp. He learned pretty quickly if you bite what feeds you you get no milk lol. I was lucky that he didn’t have any issue with going back and forth between breast and bottle but I didn’t give him a bottle until he was about a month old, and I also refused to use a pacifier in the hospital or until he was about 6 weeks old and even then very sparingly(which btw was great because it required no weaning to get him off it, I highly recommend no binkies until after the baby is able to make the bottle breast transition easily). He seemed to do very well with breast feeding and always maintained(and still does) an healthy height and weight. What makes it really hard aside from pumping is 1. breastfed babies eat more often than formula babies(aka takes way longer before they sleep through the night) 2. When you don’t nurse your breasts get very full and hard and it is extremely painful, if you have to joy to be a stay at home mom or work in a place when you have the opportunity to pump then it probably won’t be a problem for you but if you’re like me and didn’t have that option expect some very sore breasts at the end of the day and shooting out milk as soon as the bra comes off lol. I guess I have rambled long enough. Yes it was a very long and hard experience but it was completely worth it to me. Let me know if you have any other questions I am happy to share

Post # 4
Member
2815 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

People always stressed me out about breastfeeding too, but I was determined to do it. I was so worried I’d have problems though!

When my DD was born, she latched on and was feeding within an hour of birth. She was small, and initially had a shallow latch which caused blisters on my nipples. Luckily my hospital is VERY diligent in helping new moms BF, and they got me nipple cream and helped us adjust my little one’s latch.

From then on, breastfeeding was pretty easy for my DD and I. I did  have some soreness for the first month or so, but keeping up on using nipple cream was very important.

We also had an issue with DD overeating (she was IUGR and seemed to be making up for her small size after birth). It’s not very common, but she was VERY bloated, cranky, spitting up, etc. I had access to a lactation consultant and she was my saving grace.

My advice is to read lots ahead of time, find out what resources you have in your area, and be prepared. I would have struggled more had it not been for my great nurses and the lactation consultant.

My DD is 8 months and we still BF. It’s an AWESOME, conveiniant and wonderful way to bond and provide nourishment to my little one. In the beginning it can be hard, but oh my goodness it’s worth the trouble!

Post # 5
Member
45627 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

The one thing I would suggest that you remember is that this is likely to be the only time in your life when you and your baby are learning to do something at exactly the same time.

It`s generally not like the movies where the mother births the child in the field, puts him to breast and all is well.

Initially breastfeeding can be uncomfortable, but it shoudn`t be painful. The biggest cause of breast or nipple pain is a bad latch. If it hurts, break the suction with your finger, take babe off the breast and start again.

Do some reading ahead of time on websites such as http://www.lll.org

Post # 7
Member
2815 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Oh, I forgot to mention at how shocked I was when my milk actually came in.

Usually it can take a couple days for milk to come in. I had surgery the day after delivery which required no eating/drinking for 24hours. I thought for sure my milk would be even longer coming in.

Then BAM it was like they instantly filled. I was so engorged. Putting warm cloths on and manually expressing was a must! But only enough to be comfortable…as expressing too much would just make me get more engorged.

Post # 9
Member
2815 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

@Bao:  Yah, I was totally sure I’d have an issue with my milk, but nope. It came in enough for 2 babies. hah

Post # 10
Member
1659 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

I nused DD for 13 months, EBF for six months. DO NOT LET ANYONE INFLUENCE YOU – I nearly cried for the first couple of months when friends and family would tell horror stories about nursing and guilt trip me for being so determined to breast feed. I just don’t understand how it’s anybody else’s business, and it’s totally worth it! DD is an amazing, beautiful 2 year old who never gets sick. I’m so happy that I could sustain her with that nutrition.

Post # 11
Member
5658 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2011

We’re going on 3 months ebf’ing and I plan to keep going until DD self-weans! First and formost get a GOOD support system, DH has been there to cheer me on and tell me how proud he was of me in those moments I wanted to throw in the towel. Also, find good resources and USE YOUR LACTATION COUNSELOR!!!! The very best thing someone told me was to NOT make any changes in your decision for the first 6 weeks…. they are the hardest. You’ll go from loving it to hating it, easy day to hard day, BUT it DOES level out and can be the most rewarding thing you’ve ever done! (I know it has been for me)

For my personal experience…. Sometimes I think we’ve dealt with ever issue imaginable BUT I do know moms that have had harder times and ebf’d through it! 😉

Right away we noticed DD was tongue tied (her frenulum went all the way to the tip of her tongue). This made it hard for her to get & stay latched and also made it nearly impossible for her to get a good seal (even with a bottle) so she swallowed ALOT of air which made her very gassy. We finally found a pedi dentist that would/could clip it in office and so we took care of it at 7 weeks. Thankfully the tongue tie didn’t really cause any nipple pain, DD got a pretty good latch it just took time to get her latched (which REALLY frustrated her) and she couldn’t stay latched very long at a time. =/ Since then it’s been MUCH better!!!!

DD is also milk, soy, and egg protein intolerant so I’ve had to change my diet pretty drastically. It was really hard at first b/c milk can take up to 3 weeks to be out of both mom & baby’s system but since she was been like a normal baby.

Now I really love breastfeeding! Hardest thing I’ve ever done (harder than unmedicated labor) but definitely one of the most rewarding too!

My very very favorite resource is http://www.kellymom.com It’s seriously one of the only reasons we’re still ebf’ing.

Post # 14
Member
1883 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

@urchin:  omg when my milk came in i thought i was dying!! LOL. I called the hospital and everything!

Post # 15
Member
924 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2013

@runsyellowlites:  Do you know if being tongue tied is inheritable?  I’m fairly tongue tied myself and that’s something I worry about.  I don’t think my mom BF’d me, but she almost had my tongue clipped when I was 3 or 4.  She was a speech/language pathologist at the time and didn’t want to have to teach me to talk all over again.  Was it that hard to find someone to clip it?

Post # 16
Member
1855 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I tried BFing, and it just didn’t work; DS would have none of it, and none of the lactation consultants could find anything that would help us.  He was losing too much weight, and so I started pumping.  I was able to exclusively pump for 4 months (had 2 extra months of milk saved up in the freezer), so DS was able to drink breast milk for the first 6 months, which was my personal goal.  After we switched him to formula, we found out he had a milk allergy anyways, so he started drinking soy formula.  It was wonderful to be able to provide him with the nutrition he needed for those 6 months, but it wasn’t easy.  I was always juggling the double pump, feeding DS, changing milk storage bags, pumping at work, in the car, etc.  While it was kind of a mess, I am glad I did it.  

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