(Closed) Sheva Brachot in English

posted 8 years ago in Jewish
Post # 3
Member
1030 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

Hmm.. if you want to leave out G-d, you could say Adonai instead?

Post # 4
Member
941 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

Is there a rabbi you’re working with to officiate the ceremony?  They may be a good starting point in figuring out what kind of language could be used, and how much the English can be altered to still be kosher.  (Sorry, cheesy use of words.  🙂  ).

Though I’m not sure, it SEEMS like maybe G-d would need to be used, as the intention of the prayers is religious in nature?  But honestly I’m not sure, which is why I would use the rabbi as a starting point.  And, if your rabbi is more conservative/strict in nature, maybe going to a more liberal minded rabbi for support in this could be helpful.  (The rabbi at my parent’s synagogue is conservative rabbi in regards to Judaism, (vs. reform, etc). but is a VERY liberal open person, and very non traditional.  So I think you could find support from someone like that).

I’m sorry this isn’t a direct answer to your question.  Good luck though!  I hope you’re able to find the information you’re looking for!

Post # 6
Member
30 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: July 2012

@phillybridetobe: The book Celebrating Interfaith Marriages by Rabbi Devon Lerner has a few different English translations…maybe one of them would work. I bought it for like 4 dollars on Amazon and it’s been really helpful! A lot of bees have suggested this book elsewhere as well. I highly recommend it– I think it’s also good for family members to read to get an understanding of the different traditions.

And also, I think having people special to both of you read in Hebrew and English is a really awesome idea!

Post # 7
Member
125 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

Second jbird’s post.  That book is really informative!  And it has several English versions of the seven blessings that you could use. 

Post # 9
Bee
2362 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2010 - New York Botanical Garden

I don’t have alternative translations, but we did this – the sheva brachot in hebrew and in english with 14 different friends and it was awesome!

Post # 11
Bee
2362 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2010 - New York Botanical Garden

@phillybridetobe: It flowed very well and was not choppy – I would say from start to finish it took maybe 5 minutes, if that long

Post # 12
Member
172 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: March 2018 - Ritz Carlton, Marina Del Rey

I think this is a great idea.  Anita Diament has a number of different translations in her “New Jewish Weddings” book.  I think it’s also her who suggests having your non-Hebrew readers create a blessing of their own on the theme of the particular bracha that they are “translating.”  We cobbled together our own translation, which is available here: 

http://www.weddingbee.com/2009/05/11/our-chewish-programs-the-text/

Post # 13
Member
937 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

@phillybridetobe- if you can’t find a rabbi to marry you, would you consider having a Cantor from a synagogue perform the ceremony? That’s what we did, and she was AMAZING.  I have also recommended the book by Rabbi Lerner to countless bees on here. We used it for our wedding. It is a wonderful book, and it was incredibly helpful to us in creating our interfaith ceremony.

For the Sheva Brachot, we chose 7 contemporary wedding blessings, that, while non-traditional, we felt more represented us. The Cantor handed the cup of wine to Darling Husband, then she chanted our wedding blessings in Hebrew, then she translated them, and then she did the blessing over the wine, and we drank. It didn’t take long, it flowed really well, and it was beautiful.  

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