(Closed) Shoes on or off? (spinoff)

posted 5 years ago in Etiquette
Post # 76
Member
1887 posts
Buzzing bee

I grew up in the NYC area. I had a couple of friends whose houses were “no shoes,” but it was uncommon enough that they stood out. I usually don’t wear shoes in my own home, but feel it would be impolite to request that guests remove theirs.

Post # 77
Member
89 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

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MelissainNC: That kind of mentality is very different than the culture in which I’m from. (family are immigrants from the former Soviet Union living in NYC for the past 30+ years). 

Also I’m a little curious, how come it’s either wearing shoes from outside vs. being barefoot? People in the south don’t wear house slippers? 

Not trying to be rude, just genuinely curious. 

Post # 78
Member
7638 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

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clawsnpaws:  Because when you’re visiting someone else’s house, that means either (a) bringing a second set of footwear, or (b) wearing someone else’s house slippers. And from *my* perspective it’s inconvenient to do either. Slippers in your own house I can understand. Slippers at someone else’s house seems strange.

As an Australian, in the few houses I’ve been expected to take my shoes off, I’ve never been offered slippers.

I thought of something else too, and maybe it’s to do with the climate. In Australia, when you visit someone’s house, it’s common to also go into the back yard. So naturally shoes are on the whole time, unless you want to carry them through the house and then put them on when you go out the back.

Post # 79
Member
1739 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2016

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clawsnpaws:  That’s an interesting question, and I don’t have an answer.  I’ve known people with slippers, but I don’t really ever see anyone wearing them unless they have pajamas on.  Maybe because 3 seasons of the year it’s too hot?  I live in the mountains of NC where it does actually snow somewhat regularly every winter, but in most of the rest of the state, it only snows once every few years, and winters are fairly mild.  Maybe we just don’t invest in them for the 1 or 2 months they may be worn?  I’m sure some people do wear them, but it’s not as common as it seems to be elsewhere.

Post # 80
Member
89 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

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MelissainNC:  thanks for the reply. That’s very interesting, in my culture wearing slippers doesn’t really have much to do with the weather or seasons. It’s just house footwear so you aren’t walking barefoot. For example my “house slippers”  are just a pair of flip flops that are only for indoor use.

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aussiemum1248:  differences in culture and upbringing is definitely interesting to compare. Everyone I know keeps lots of slippers so when you visit someone,  you take shoes off at the door and  they offer you slippers. The slippers are purchased specifically for guests to wear when they come over. 

Post # 81
Member
10113 posts
Sugar Beekeeper

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babygrandmabee:  

Absolutely . I’ll take them off if I have to , but I would not wear shared ones, eew. My h. almost  never wears shoes inside  –  he’s from Queensand – but I wear thongs , the flip flop kind I hasten  to add!

 

Post # 82
Member
2251 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

The shoes have to come off! Look,  you’re walking in them everywhere,  including public bathrooms,  and then you gonna step in your nasty shoes on my carpet/hardwood?  No maam! Shoes off!  I don’t care if you have a hole  in your socks,  as long as you’re not trailing fecal matter with your every step. 

Post # 83
Member
422 posts
Helper bee

 

Shoes off in homes, we’re Canadian, and its just the way it is (at least locally)!

Shoes on at work though. I’m pretty sure these carpets in my office have never, ever been cleaned.

theatrejulia: For what it’s worth we don’t have pets and it bothers me when guests come over covered in their animal hair, but what can you do. Also, we would never judge for a hole in a sock 🙂

 

But what if its snowy outside? It’s hard to make sure you get all the snow, and ice, and water out of your shoes before tracking it in, isn’t it?

Post # 84
Member
3163 posts
Sugar bee

Sydney, Australia here and shoes on unless I am visiting close family or some very close friends and am going to be flopping on their couch. In our circles specific shoe off houses would be rare (in fact I can’t think of any). 

Post # 85
Member
10635 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

Off.  It would be really rude here to wear your shoes in someone else’s house unless they tell you too.  Those who wear shoes in the house with the exception of those who have indoor shoes tend to have dirty homes in general.

I really don’t like the idea of tracking bacteria and whatever else you pick up on your shoes throughout the house.

Post # 86
Member
2167 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

I don’t like taking my shoes off and I prefer guests keep their shoes on. I have durable floors for a reason and quite frankly I feel like a child when I’m told to take my shoes of at someone elses house. 

Post # 87
Member
357 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

So what would any of you people do (ones who say shoes off) if the person has very stinky feet, and tells you this is the reason they don’t want to take their shoes off? Would you tell them to take them off anyways? How would you deal with the stinky feet afterwards?

Post # 88
Member
1011 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2017

I live in Ireland and no one takes their shoes off when visiting. With our predominantly damp/cold weather our feet would freeze without shoes on as most houses have wood/tiled flooring. Fiance and I wear slippers at home to keep them warm!

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