(Closed) Should I ask about Maternity Leave Policy at Yearly Review?

posted 8 years ago in Babies
  • poll: Would you ask at your yearly review?
    Yes, it's a good time to ask : (14 votes)
    26 %
    No, wait till you're actually pregnant : (26 votes)
    48 %
    Other : (14 votes)
    26 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    654 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: October 2011

    Of course you should ask!  Just b/c you want to know what the policy is, doesn’t mean that you have to let them know that you want to have a baby right now.  Nor should they assume it.  I work for a company that started off super small and was mainly male dominated.  There was no need for a policy.  Things have now changed and we all worked to get a policy in place.  It’s just like one of your benefits.  Shouldn’t you know what your benefits are?

    Post # 4
    Member
    5118 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: November 1999

    I answered other. I don’t know that I’d bring it up during the review, since that’s generally the time they are making promotion and other important decisions, and asking the question may make them think you are going to be out in the next 9 months (they may assume you’re already pregnant). I’d want them making all of my promotion/raise decisions based solely on my work product, not with the thought that ‘maybe she’s leaving in a few months.’ That’s not how it should go and there should be no pregnancy discrimination, but I’m just cautious.

    I also wouldn’t wait until you’re pregnant, because then you really are on a timeline and it’d be nice to know the details of the maternity leave before it’s actually a reality. I’d do the yearly review, not bring it up, wait until decisions are made (if they announce promotions/raises relatively soon after that…6 months is too long if you’re already TTC). Then I’d schedule a separate meeting after those announcements to discuss the maternity leave policy. 

    Post # 5
    Member
    1220 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: November 2009

    I hate to say it, and yes, it’s illegal, but if you bring it up at your review it can sway their thought of your performace, just like NDbee said.  I’d wait until afterwards (maybe in 3-4 months) and schedule another appointment with HR to discuss.

    Post # 6
    Member
    536 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: September 2007

    I agree with NDBee- unless your review is your only chance to talk to a person who would be able to answer your questions, I’d keep them entirely separate (I’d probably wait for the entire review process to be over and see my salary/bonus info for the next year before bringing it up). Then I’d schedule a time to meet with someone about it, and definitely before you TTC.

    Post # 7
    Member
    6572 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: February 2010

    Is it going to affect your decision to keep working there? If so, I’d go ahead and ask. If not, I’d wait until after for the reasons others have said.

    Post # 8
    Member
    1876 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: October 2014

    Do not do it during your review. That is not the time or the place – and I’m sorry, but it will make you look unprofessional. I’d wait and e-mail the day-to-day HR woman and just ask what the policy is. But do not do this during your review or you risk looking like you are more concerned about the benefits then your performance. Hopefully your company has a good policy 🙂

    Post # 9
    Member
    687 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: December 1969

    Agreed. I would wait until after the review to ask. Also, you should research your state laws re maternity leave to be sure you’re aware of your full rights. I’d like to say that all HR departments are on top of the ball, but I worked at a law firm who should know the laws back and forth (mind you), and the HR manager was totally out of it when it came to maternity leave.

    In general, if you work full-time for a minimum of 1 year or 1250 hours for a company that has more than 50 employees, you’re entitled to 12 weeks of FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act). Companies with less than 50 employees are NOT required to do this. FMLA means your job is required to hold your position.

    Some states, like mine, offer pregnancy leave for conditions associated with pregnancy, prior to birth. And additional pay (but not time) after the birth.

    I think it’s great that you’re thinking about this now so you know you’ll be prepared when the time comes, but I would be hesitant to bring it up to your bosses until it’s closer to the time you’ll be ready to TTC.

    Post # 10
    Member
    5496 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: April 2010

    I would definately wait until afterwards to ask about the policy for the same reasons other posters mentioned above.

    Post # 11
    Member
    3871 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: November 1999

    I also want to know what my materinity leave policy is but I’m a bit worried about who to ask. I could ask my HR rep but I don’t know I don’t want it to be awkward.  I could email our HR, but I don’t want it linked back to my account. I searched our intranet but I can’t seem to find it.   There is at least one pregnant women that I know of and I’m hoping to ‘bump’ into her so I could ask her.

    Post # 12
    Member
    627 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: August 2011

    i totally asked the HR partner at my firm about this for planning purposes. i would definitely do it while you have her there before so that you can plan.

    {EDIT} i did this at a separate time, not during my performance review.

     

    Post # 13
    Member
    2090 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: August 2010

    If you are TTC you should ask ASAP, IMO (but I wouldn’t ask at my annual review, for the reasons already described). Some companies do not provide paid maternity leave, but you can use Short Term Disability (STD) benefits, if you have them. Some employers provide STD as part of your job “package” (mine does, so for instance, the first 6 weeks of maternity leave are now paid at 100% pay, paid via my STD benefits).

    In previous years however, our maternity leave was still done via STD, but paid at only 66 1/3 of our current pay for the first 6 weeks. After the first 6 weeks under STD, your Long Term Disability can kick in, which is at a reduced pay amount as well (66 1/3% in my case). If your employer is subject to FMLA, you are allowed to take up to 12 weeks of maternity leave, unpaid.

    The trick though, is that if STD/LTD are not part of your job package and you are not automatically enrolled in either/both programs, you can generally only sign up once a year during the “open enrollment” period, or within the 90 days after a qualifying life event. (At least, this is the case at our company).

    You might want to contact HR soon in case you need to enroll in a STD program in order to receive paid maternity leave. Hope this post makes sense!

    Post # 15
    Member
    6661 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: May 2010

    Absolutely not during your performance review. It’s totally irrelevant, you are there to discuss your performance as an employee. And I agree that it will make you look unprofessional (unfortunately). If I were you, I would wait until about 1 month after the review then sit with the HR person and as about it. They still might think it’s strange that you are asking before you’re expecting, but that’s their fault since it isn’t clear in the handbook.

    Post # 16
    Member
    5670 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: August 2010

    Is there an HR rep at your company? I wouldn’t ask during your performance review and I wouldn’t ask the HR director or your manager. See if there is another HR professional that you can speak to and ask in confidence. Legally it cannot be held against you but it could make some biased towards you.

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