(Closed) Should people be paid for donating bodily fluids or organs?

posted 7 years ago in The Lounge
  • poll: People should be paid for donating

    Nothing

    All of the below

    Blood

    Specific blood products - eg. plasma

    Sperm

    Eggs

    A kidney

    Hair

  • Post # 17
    Member
    1007 posts
    Bumble bee

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    @AB Bride:  I think things like blood and hair should be paid as it all “comes back” to the donor as opposed to say a kidney or eggs. I think paying a “donor” a small amount would be a good incentive especially if it is something in a high demand with a shortage.

    I think it’d be nice but I wouldn’t expect it.

     

    Post # 18
    Member
    1409 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: June 2014

    I’m not terribly educated on this subject and haven’t thought much about the philosophical implications or how it could affect society.

    There’s definitely an issue of class. Is it wrong for a rich man to live and a poor man to die, when both their livers were failing, because one could afford a new kidney and the other couldn’t? I think so. Could it be a good idea for a country with universal healthcare to pay all kidney donors? I don’t know. All I know is donating a kidney affects your health for the rest of your life. You can also donate a portion of your liver, lungs, and pancreas, but I don’t know how that affects your long term health.

    I voted only that women should be compensated for donating eggs, but now I’m reconsidering that. Donating eggs involves a lot of work, though arguably not as much as being pregnant (speaking of which what about hiring a surrogate?) and I’m pretty sure it can lead tohealth issues including infertility. I have mixed feelings on infertile couples choosing egg donation over adoption, but should a wealthy couple have that choice over a poor one? Also a part of me feels like since men have an endless supply of sperm and it’s easy to donate it, if they choose to do so it should be out of the goodness of their heart, but is that sexist? And back on egg donation, is paying a desperate woman $10000 to donate her eggs taking advantage, especially if it could theoretically render her infertile, preventing her from having biological children of her own? Back on kidneys, is it taking advantage of a poor person who sells one of theirs? 

    On the one hand incentives are nice, but I really think eligible people should donate blood products or hair because they want to, not for the money. This coming from a girl who has donated blood around 8 times, tried to sell plasma once but didn’t weigh enough, and meant to donate her hair once but never got around to it. When I donate blood though I appreciate the free snacks. I think food is usually a harmless bribe.

    Post # 19
    Member
    3281 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: January 2014

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    @ladyamalthea:  Jus fyi, donating eggs has never been shown to render you infertile or cause cancer. There are some health risks, for sure, but they happen in less than 1% of cases and, with my clinic, at least, they monitor you every single day the month before your retrieval to make sure they can catch any issues that come up.

    Post # 20
    Member
    3723 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: September 2014

    @AB Bride:  You get paid to donate eggs in the US by many clinics. I think some blood products too. I would NEVER pay for sperm since so many men are happy to part with it but, well, seriously, if I needed a donor, I would pay. Oh geez.

    I don’t have a problem with paying for things I want or need. I just don’t want to end up in a bath tub full of ice with a roughly sutured gash in my side.

    Post # 22
    Member
    3723 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: September 2014

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    @ladyamalthea:  I’m not a desperate woman but I have thought about egg donation before. You know what stopped me? I couldn’t LIVE with the idea of a piece of me being on this earth that I could see and love every single day. It’s just not in me.

    I think I’m too old now to donate but my feelings on donating eggs and my need to see the child would still prevent me from doing so. I would be an AWESOME mom and I wouldn’t want anyone potentially not loving my kid as much as I would/could/should.

    Post # 23
    Member
    4369 posts
    Honey bee

    I say all of the above except the kidney. If you want to sell some part of your body that can be regenerated, that’s up to you. But making vital organs a commodity is dangerous because as someone else said, I don’t want to end up in a bathtub full of ice.

    Post # 24
    Member
    1646 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: November 2015

    @AB Bride:  My younger sister donated half her liver to a teenager from our hometown 3 years ago (she was 20 at the time). I won’t lie, it would have been awesome to see her get some sort of money for what she went through. . . but at the same time she was willing and mentally able to agree to give up part of herself to save this kid. She shunned the spotlight and asked for people not to share what she went through because she wanted the focus to be on this kid and making sure he got healthy. In short, she did it for the right reasons and she wound up saving that kid’s life.

    For things that regenerate and are not organs, I would say I would be more open to the idea of paying money for them – although, I used to donate blood a lot and I was more than content with some cookies and juice after (it’s my inner pre-schooler). So maybe, for those, seperate them into two categories: donation and for sale. Donation can be all of those items listed. You won’t receive any money in return for helping another person, while for sale items could include things like hair because it’s used in different products and not just for medical purposes.

    For others, such as organs (like kidneys and livers), I would say absolutely not. It could lead to issues with who could actually afford to pay a donor and it could, additionally, lead potential donors to pick and choose who gets to live or die (based off how much money they are being offered). The lists of people needing organs are far from perfect – and far too many people die before finding a match – but I do feel strongly that paying potential donors could cause all sorts of ethical problems.

    I do think that more people need to be aware of how amazing being organ donor is and the different types of donation. I also think we should be focusing more on telling the truth about donation; for instance, ER doctors are not going to let a patient die on the operating table in order to save the life of someone who needs a transplant.

    If anyone wants additional information, feel free to private message me or visit: donatelife.net

     

    Post # 25
    Member
    1130 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: December 2014

    No. Simply because donation of body parts is a selfless action and I think it’s inappropriate to compensate people for that. It’s illegal to get money for organs or blood here, and it should remain that way. People don’t pay to get transplants here, so donors or their families should not expect payment for anything they donate. That would be inappropriate.

    Post # 27
    Member
    1646 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: November 2015

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    @ladyamalthea:  I can speak for the livers! As far as I know, it really doesn’t have a huge impact. They take roughly half your liver for an adult and a bit less for a child (to allow it room to grow and expand as the kid grows). After the donation is complete, it takes a few weeks for the liver to regenerate. The half donated doesn’t grow back though; the remaining half simply expands. So you wind up with a fully functioning liver. You do need to avoid things like alcohol, sex, and physical exercise for a while, but your Doctor can clear you for those things relatively quickly depending on how fast you heal. You can live a full and healthy life after donating a liver just like anyone else.

    For the record, baby sister is now 23 and is one of the healthiest people I’ve ever met. Smile

    Post # 28
    Member
    4494 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: October 2013

    I say no, but really I do think more people would opt to donate if they were paid to do so. However that could turn quite dangerous so :-/

    I am an organ donor simply because I know that if I were in a situation where I needed an organ – I’d take it. If I’m willing to receive someone else’s then I feel that I should be willing to give.

    I don’t give blood, but I would if I could (I don’t weigh enough :-/). Other than being unable to do so medically I’m not sure why anyone would be against donating blood (as long as its a clean, safe environment) without compensation.

    Post # 29
    Member
    2818 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: December 2012

    My DH works in the plasma industry and he always says, people are paid for their time when donating, they aren’t paid for their plasma. While I’ve never donated before my DH said for new donors it can take up to 3 hours (after all the paperwork, a physical, etc). For regular donors more like an hour (although there are some other factors that make a difference). Without the incentive of money a lot of people would not donate, so I definitely think people should be paid for it. Plasma is super important as its used to make medicine to treat people with hemophilia and immune system deficiencies.

    Post # 30
    Member
    1409 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: June 2014

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    @howsweetitis:  Good to know! I just hope women who do it are educated about the risks, small though they might be ๐Ÿ™‚

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    @AB Bride:  I think it’s fair for people to be reimbursed for their time, in fact, since employers give paid maternity leave, I think they should give paid organ donation leave too. It’s not like people are going to take advantage of it all the time ๐Ÿ˜›

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    @LilRhodyGem:  I hope I didn’t imply that I think all women who do it are desperate! I just think desperate women are less likely to make sure they know all the risks involved, which apparently are less than I thought. I think egg donation can be a really beautiful thing to do, but it’s a very personal choice, and my primary reasons for not wanting to do it myself are similar to yours ๐Ÿ™‚ But I think if I felt like I’d never be the maternal type I might do it as a way to put my DNA out there, and take the money as fair compensation for my efforts.

     

     

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    @LoggerHead91207:  Good to know! It sounds like your sister is an amazing person. I’m an organ donor and on the bone marrow registry, and I like to think that if I found out my liver was a match for someone who needed it, I could be as selfless as she was ๐Ÿ™‚

    Post # 31
    Member
    865 posts
    Busy bee

    I donated my kidney to my dad 3 years ago and while I did not get paid for it (of course) there were programs in place to reimburse my travel costs (it was out of province and I had to stay in a hotel for 4 days after). It would be nice if people did not have to experience a financial loss dur to donating (through travel or loss of work) but I am very much against paying for organs. Desperate people would make bad medical decisions out of necessity.

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