Should we postpone our wedding? (coronavirus)

posted 8 months ago in Logistics
Post # 31
Member
1717 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2017 - California

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ichliebe :  I think it depends a lot on the size of your wedding as well as if you would want to proceed without the out of town guests. I would not proceed with a large wedding at this time, only because we need to all be practicing soclal distancing and avoiding large gatherings to try to slow the spread of Coronavirus now so that we don’t end up in a bad situation latter with hospitals being overwhelmed and having to ration care. If it is a small wedding and you would be OK with out of town guests not coming then it might make sense to still go ahead. Lots of people are avoiding non-essential travel right now, so your out of town guests may not be able to make it, as well as anyone who is over 60 or immunocompromised. I wouldn’t necessarily cancel unless you felt like you would not want to go ahead without those guests in attendance and unless it was a large wedding (I’m not sure where the line is drawn as far as large gatherings, so that may be a tough call). 

Post # 32
Member
5754 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: July 2018

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justanormalgal :   however you are experiencing the fall out of people going into hysterics and panicking instead of using rational thought processes.  

At this point you are just being totally irresponsible with your comments. 

Almost every country in Europe has now canceled schools, universities and put a ban on public gatherings, with Ireland being the most recent one this morning banning gatherings of over 100 people.

The US and the UK have cut central bank interest rates to try and mitigate the effect this will have on the economy. Italy have had to country wide pause mortgage payments and close all non essential stores from opening.  

Funny that you know exactly what should be done and all these experts across the globe are being “hysterical” and not rational. 

Post # 33
Member
7818 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

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ichliebe :  I’m sorry you are in this position. Based upon scientific predictions I expect the US situation will be much worse by April 3. I plan a lot of medium to large-scale events and am currently in active discussions about cancellations and alternative plans for everything through the end of June at the moment. I have a major personal event in July and am considering what my options may be. I’m hoping all will be settled by Fall. 

Have you spoken with your vendors re: refunds, etc.? What has your sister said about travel? 

Wishing you the best, these are challenging times. 

Post # 34
Member
7818 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

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justanormalgal :  Panic is buying a year’s worth of toilet paper and hoarding it. It’s rational, responsible, smart and kind for people to follow the recommendations personal, regional, state and national medical professionals, the CDC and WHO all agree are necessary to slow the spread of this virus. 

Post # 35
Member
4442 posts
Honey bee

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gimmepretty :  by the way, this disease is not airborne. 

Post # 36
Member
7818 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

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zl27 :  Per the CDC it is definitely spread by “respiratory droplets” when people cough or sneeze and can live on surfaces for a surprising length of time. If the person three feet away from you on the subway coughs or sneezes you are at risk. If someone sneezes 15 rows in front of you on the airplane you’re probably fine. If you touch the headrest in front of that person while you make your way off the plane you may be exposed. But I don’t believe earlier hypotheses that it was spread through AC systems have been proven. 

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/transmission.html

Post # 38
Member
2058 posts
Buzzing bee

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zl27 :  

Yes it is.  The CDC avoids using that term because it scares people, but a CDC worker put in charge of a designated quarantine center didn’t deny it when interviewed because knowing the biology is enough of an explanation.  The virus is present in the saliva and mucus.  A cough typically spreads germs up ten feet.  A sneeze spreads germs up to 25-30 feet.  One sneeze can contain tens of thousands of virions that are released into the air.  If it were a very fragile virus, that couldn’t survive outside the body, this wouldn’t be such an issue.  But it can survive outside the body for three days.  So the sneeze projects the virions about thirty feet.  Then consider air movement due a vent blowing, a fan running, a door swinging, the virions are carried even further and they stay viable wherever they land.  But they don’t even land right away.  They spread in the air pathway.  Yes it is airborne.  It absolutely is.

Post # 39
Member
486 posts
Helper bee

I honestly think if it were my wedding, I would cancel.  I feel that what’s going on in terms of safety and precaution would be more important than my wedding.  I know that’s naive to say when you consider payments and planning, but I am a little tired of people treating this like it’s nothing.  The “it’s countries away, it’s states away”, “it’s only harming elderly” (which not sure why that’s comforting because I have many elderly people in my life whom I love).

i live in a college town.  A professor at that college is our first known coronavirus patient in the state.  That college went to spring break like 2 weeks early.  My job in restaurants has slowed down with people cancelling banquets with us months down the road.  Graduation weekend, end of May, has mass cancellations and that’s one of our busiest times.  I’m waiting to see if my community college classes will resume next week.  A future landlord of my new home in a month is on the fence about letting us move in because he’s so convinced the spread of the virus will affect my restaurant job income.

theres no need for mass hysteria and panic, ive seen how that’s giving people excess anxiety and that’s never healthy.  But this is a big deal and warrants precaution, if not for ourselves then for the people around us.

Post # 40
Member
4442 posts
Honey bee

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beethree :  large droplets does not equal airborne when it comes to infectious diseases.

Post # 41
Member
4442 posts
Honey bee

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KittyYogi :  okay, that’s new information. I concede.

Post # 42
Member
2058 posts
Buzzing bee

preliminary study published this week found the virus could be detected in the air for up to three hours after it was aerosolized with a nebulizer, up to four hours on copper, up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to two to three days on plastic and stainless steel.

The newest research, which has not yet been peer reviewed, was conducted by scientists at the National Institutes of Health, Princeton University, the University of California and the CDC.

Post # 43
Member
2058 posts
Buzzing bee

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zl27 :  sneezes and coughs are small droplets, light enough to be carried in the wind.  “Carried in the air over distance and viable on contact” is airborne.  A virus doesn’t have to be carried THROUGH AC units to be airborne.  But it can be pushed through the air and stirred up in the air by any air movement. And don’t forget, this virus doesn’t need the droplet to survive.  It can airdry and still bounce around in the air and still be viable. In a somewhat closed space with high air movement, it could travel quite a bit, even outdoors.  Consider the tiny outdoor markets that are popular in Italy.  It spreads, lands on food, people buy it and eat it.  Almost all respiratory viruses and many bacteria are airborne but the CDC will pee itself before saying it about anything more serious than a cold.  This virus is airborne and that’s why it’s spreading so badly.

Post # 44
Member
10602 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: City, State

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ichliebe :  I would push to late summer/early fall to be on the safe side. But that is totally just me.

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