(Closed) Show Me Your Clarity Enhanced Rings!

posted 7 years ago in Rings
Post # 2
Member
1046 posts
Bumble bee

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nikkibollinger:  you do know that clarity enhanced diamonds can be weaker right? Also it depends on how bad it used to be. If it was heavily included, it most likely have been drilled or filled a lot more, which makes the structure weaker.

What’s your budget? And how big do you want your Diamond to be?

Post # 3
Member
10041 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2013

If your going to get a clarity enhanced diamond your better off getting one that’s been laser drilled instead of fracture filled. Laser drilling if perminant and these diamonds can be certified by reputable labs like Gia. (igl is not a reputable)

Post # 4
Member
10041 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2013

I know you said your not into moissanite but there is a newer stone that is called the Amora Gem Ultra which is made of similar materials as moissanite but is available in colorless to near colorless, is ideal cut and looks alot like a diamond. I have a diamond and a amora gem and I can honestly tell you that it really does look like a diamond and is beautiful. It also cost alot less than a diamond and is a forever stone. You could get your dream setting and a great quality stone. The picture above is of my amora gem ultra in a diamond halo setting.

Post # 5
Member
93 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

A lot of jewelers will not set clarity enhanced stones because of the fracture/damage risk so be sure if you plan to go buy a setting that they are willing to sell you a designer setting with a CE stone.

 

What is the saying? you get what you pay for?

 

There’s no free lunch in diamonds.

  • This reply was modified 6 years, 9 months ago by sc5645.
Post # 6
Member
446 posts
Helper bee

A clarity enhanced diamond in a Verragio?

I would suggest investing the cost of the designer setting in the diamond instead. Have it put in a solitaire, and upgrade the setting later. Putting a junky diamond in a setting that costs thousands doesn’t make sense to me.

Post # 7
Member
1455 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: February 2012

It’s not a junky diamond so don’t even go there. 

You are purchasing a diamond that was filled to mask some flaws. It is important that you know what type of flaw and where it is located in the stone. If it’s a feather that breaks the surface then you might want to think twice and keep looking.

Find yourself a reputable seller who would be open to you taking your stone to an independent gemologist to help in your decision. A CE diamond could very well be your forever stone but you will need a professional’s opinion to help you decide if the stone you’ve picked is worth the risk. 

Post # 8
Member
446 posts
Helper bee

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womanofsubstance:  That’s your opinion. I think the OP should weigh all options. Clarity enhanced diamonds haven’t been around for that long, and their longevity as a forever ring is somewhat questionable. They may also require special care, such as not cleaning it in an ultrasonic. For me, as I said, a better option would be to take the thousands that would have gone into a designer setting and put that into a non-enhanced one carat stone. 

At the very least, I would suggest buying the clarity enhanced diamond from a reputable dealer who can offer a lifetime gaurantee on the stone, NOT a seller on eBay. Really, that’s the most important thing here if OP wants a forever stone. 

This isn’t coming from a snob with a huge budget, it’s coming from someone with a limited budget who has looked into options like enhanced diamonds and alternatives, but decided on a smaller, quality diamond instead, based on what I saw during my research. 

Here’s a snippet of what I read, written by an appraiser:

Pro: 

They’re usually better looking than they were before they were filled. Often by quite a bit. <br style=”color: #192b40; font-family: helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;” /><br style=”color: #192b40; font-family: helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;” />Cons: <br style=”color: #192b40; font-family: helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;” />They require a certain amount of special care.<br style=”color: #192b40; font-family: helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;” /><br style=”color: #192b40; font-family: helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;” />There is no standardized grading system for them and grading abuse is rampant. You <strong class=”bbc” style=”color: #192b40; font-family: helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;”>CAN NOT use the clarity grading phrases like SI2, VS1, etc to compare them against untreated stones with the same descriptor and it’s remarkably difficult to even use the claimed clarity grades to compare against other clarity enhanced stones, especially if they’re from a different source. You can’t even rely on the color grades because the major labs won’t grade them at all and you’re left to the dealer supplied grades and second tier labs of questionable repute. The result is a disaster in terms of useable shopping information. <br style=”color: #192b40; font-family: helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;” /><br style=”color: #192b40; font-family: helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;” />The market is less competitive than for untreated stones so commissions and markups to dealers tend to be higher.  <br style=”color: #192b40; font-family: helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;” /><br style=”color: #192b40; font-family: helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;” />They’re pretty much unsaleable on the secondary market. (dealers normally won’t take them back, even at a steep discount)<br style=”color: #192b40; font-family: helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;” /><br style=”color: #192b40; font-family: helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;” />The stones the manufacturers choose to treat are often dogs for other reasons, like cutting, and it’s wickedly difficult to get this information out of the dealers. Often they don’t know and often they’re using bogus labs to hide behind but the effect is the same. You can’t get complete shopping information.”

There’s just a lot to consider. I definitely believe in “you get what you pay for” and “if it’s too good to be true, it probably is”. I feel that too often, the beauty and even durability aspects of a diamond are sacrificed in favor of size. I love a big diamond, but not if sparkle, cut, and quality have to be sacrificed. Maybe the OP thinks differently, but weighing the pros and cons certainly couldn’t hurt.

Post # 9
Member
581 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2015

Following* 

Post # 10
Member
47 posts
Newbee

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mrssloan2013:  I just created a thread asking about moissys and Amora gems not realizing you had one.  Where did you get your ring and are those diamonds in the halo?  It is GORGEOUS!!!

  • This reply was modified 6 years, 9 months ago by Bqqkworm.
Post # 11
Member
10041 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2013

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Bqqkworm:  I think i may have replied to that thread. The amora gem is from winkcz.com and the halo setting was made by David klass and yes they are diamonds. Thanks 🙂

Post # 12
Member
353 posts
Helper bee

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nikkibollinger:  It depends on the type of clarity enhanced treatment. Fracture filling is no good and GIA does not issue grade reports food fracture filled diamonds. GIA DOES grade laser drilled diamonds. I have a laser drilled CE. I suppose time will tell how durable it is, but for now it’s great.

Post # 13
Member
561 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2016 - Akron, OH

I didn’t know you can’t use an ultra sonic cleaner on a clarity enhanced. How else do you clean it?

Post # 14
Member
353 posts
Helper bee

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WannaBee2BridalBee:  you can use an ultra sonic cleaner on a laser drilled diamond without fillers 

Post # 15
Member
234 posts
Helper bee

I have a clarity enhanced diamond and honestly it looks great and I wouldn’t trade it I managed to get a bigger stone for a much smaller price and it has been nothing but solid.  I think clarity enhanced is a good option for brides that don’t have thousands for a stone. 

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