Slang words from where you live – like cheeky!

posted 1 week ago in The Lounge
Post # 2
Member
18 posts
Newbee

UK with US boyfriend and he often has to ask me ‘what does that word mean?’ The latest word I used that he didn’t get was ‘peckish’ when he asked if I was hungry (peckish: slightly hungry).

He also needed to ask me to define posh and cuppa… and many more words I can’t think of right now! I think UK and Australian English are very similar but US English is strangely so different!

 

Post # 3
Member
1050 posts
Bumble bee

Dodgy- Had to this explain this to a few people outside the UK. It can be used to describe people, places, things, situations etc. Is is similar to sketchy, meaning appearing suspicious, not safe, not “kosher”, not reliable, not of good quality etc. E.g. He sold you a a dodgy motor (He sold you an unreliable poor quality car). 

Post # 5
Member
1067 posts
Bumble bee

.My fh is bilingual French/English. He speaks a dialect called Acadian. It is a combination of both languages… similar to Cajun. So some words aren’t French or English. Lol. This is specific to small pockets in Atlantic Canada. 

One of the cute words is DoDo. Which is slang for sleep. He literally does not say sleep. I suppose it comes from French  Dormir. 

Post # 6
Member
8950 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

I’m from Australia and we pretty much have a slang word for everything. 

Post # 7
Member
55 posts
Worker bee

‘Fag’ means cigarette (e.g. have you got a fag, mate?)

‘Chuffed’ means when you are pleased or happy about something (I am so chuffed with my exam results). 

‘Mate’ is a way to address someone (e.g. excuse me, mate)

‘Ledge’ is a shortened word for legend (e.g. You are such a ledge)

‘Gutted’ is when you feel disappointed (e.g. I was gutted when we lost the match)

Fluke is when something is cause by luck or chance (I passed my exam, what a fluke)

‘can’t be arsed’ is an impolite way to say you can’t be bothered (I can’t be arsed to go to that party)

‘Gagging’ is when you really want something (I am gagging for a cuppa)

 

Post # 9
Member
2684 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

The one I didn’t realise isn’t even universal in the UK is mufty. I was at slimming world talking about how Wednesday are my mufty day and I had to explain it. 

Mufty mean doing something different to the norm. I mostly used it at school to describe non uniform days. 

In my house there are endless debates over whether we’re having tea, dinner or supper

Post # 12
Member
2684 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

A lot of people in London haven’t heard of it, but where I grew up it was very common. One other lady in the group knew mufty. princessmiaofgenovia :  

Post # 13
Member
1148 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2021 - City, State

Snarler – a sausage (it’s a very Glaswegian word)

close (the part of the building between flats.

stank – the drain in which water goes down when it rains – they’re at the kerbside

fanny – absolutely an insult, word for a vagina. I was super shocked when someone’s fanny was poking out their shorts the first time I read an American book. I always giggle at “fanny pack” every. Single. Time 

Post # 14
Member
55 posts
Worker bee

whoswho :  AGREED!! Fanny means vagina where I am from. The first time I heard the word ‘fanny pack’, I was in hysterics. We call it a ‘bum bag’ where I am from.

Post # 15
Member
809 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

I’m American but know a lot of the UK slang because I’ve had friends from England. This one was funny when I learned it:

“knock me up” – UK English = knock on my door

“knock me up” – American English = get me pregnant

So, my Brittish friend asked me to “knock me up in the morning” (i.e., knock on her door to wake her up), but the first time she said this, I couldn’t help laughing, because it sounded like she was asking me to get her pregnant.

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