(Closed) So, Ah- Corsets – were they made to complicate a woman?

posted 7 years ago in Intimacy
Post # 3
Member
5993 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2010

i have a corset that is tied at the back but has buttons/snaps on the front – much more hubby friendly 😉

Post # 4
Member
3482 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2011

The corsets available in lingerie shops typically aren’t as heavy duty as traditional corsets. Real corsets are super expensive, have steel boning, are made of stiff fabric, and are generally sold only in shops that specialize in making them.

I’d scope out your local lingerie shops and choose a corset/bustier with flexible boning (no rigid steel) and hooks going up the front so you don’t have to mess around with the laces in the back unless you want to adjust the size. You won’t have trouble breathing OR getting it on or off.

Post # 5
Member
3981 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

Fredericks of Hollywood has some nice ones that button in the front and are stretchy so it is easier to breathe.

Post # 6
Member
2157 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

I have one that is all laced up in the back already and its not meant to be undone, and then at the top of the lacing it’s just hooks – the same as on a bra. that way, they already (usually) know how to undo those ones.

Post # 7
Member
389 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I second @linguo42:, the “corsets” you can buy at most lingerie stores are only made to look like the old corsets.

There are lots of places that have corsets with zippers in the side, made out of stretchy fabric and the lacing in the back can be sewn in, so you can’t even open it if you try 😀 Beware that if you get one of those with plastic boning, they’re not gonna stay in the shape that you want them to. If you don’t sit up straight, they can bend inwards to poke you in the stomache or/and into a s-shape and look funny when you stand up again!

I actually find the steel boned corsets more comfortable, because they give my back a lot of support, and you don’t have to tie it that tight if you don’t want to.

Post # 9
Member
627 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I have done legit corsets and the things they sell at the lingerie places. You will have no problem breathing in the latter, I used to wear them in musicals I had to sing in. The former I would only wear when needed for accuracy at various costuming events.

The fake corsets hook-and-eye in the front so they are not hard to get in and out of, just make sure you don’t tie them too much at the back. If possible, as a friend to help you lace it the first time and then just don’t untie it, only get in and out of it via the front. 

Fredericks makes some good fake corsets and merrywidows. 

Post # 10
Member
5009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2012

I actually find proper corsets are far more comfortable than the cheap ones. They don’t buckle in on you like plastic boned ones do.

If you’re wearing a proper corset then it should be very simple to put on and take off, after a little bit of practice.

Post # 11
Member
5093 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 2012

You can even breathe in the old-fashioned corsets if they’re made correctly and you’re not tight-lacing.  I work at a renaissance festival and wear real corsets with steel boning approximately 100 days per year (which is more than any modern woman ever should, but that’s a different story).  If you get one that fits you well, then you can perform theatre and sing opera with no problems.

Like everyone suggested, there are the lingerie types of corsets, which don’t actually do anything, and then there are the real corsets that do everything.  There are also a few happy mediums out there, too.  Leather corsets with light boning will hold you in, give you all the support you need, and shape your body, but they do so without any of the discomfort that real corsets cause.

Feel free to PM me if you have any other questions.  I’m very familiar with corsets of all kinds and from all periods, have fair knowledge of some of the more reputable vendors, and love to convert others to the way of the corset.  🙂

Post # 12
Member
5093 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 2012

@SpecialSundae:  It really does depend on the type of corset.  If it’s a completely back-lacing corset with no busk in the front so she can let herself in or out, it’s pretty much impossible to do on her own.  Even if the corset does have a busk in the front, a lot depends on the shape and style of the lacing in the back.

Post # 13
Member
5009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2012

@GreenEyedMoon: True. The most fabulously simple corset to get in and out of was one that I found with fan lacings and a front busk (which I won’t do without on a corset anyway, but I don’t tend to go earlier than 1860ish with my corset styles). All you had to do was pull a set of straps at the front and the lacings tightened. Now I wish I’d bought it rather than thinking about it (I was broke).

I’ve been wearing 1860s-1900s corsets on a relatively regular basis since my mid-teens. I did have one set of 1700s-style stays but they weren’t really right for my shape and looked truly obscene with a 34F bust… (Come to think of it, I should get another set made as my fiance would LOVE them.)

Post # 14
Member
5093 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 2012

@SpecialSundae:  LOL.  Yeah, I’m fairly busty, too, but Fiance just got me a modified English renaissance corset (same shape – that is, almost completely flat on the front like the traditional ones, but with the front busk and a sweetheart neckline), and he LOVES it because my boobs are spilling out the whole time.

Post # 15
Member
5009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2012

@GreenEyedMoon: I have a total obsession with late 1860s-early 1870s gored bust corsets at the moment as they give me a fabulous shape, a great reduction and still feel very comfortable. My wedding corset is from an 1873 pattern with corded panels and bust gores.

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