(Closed) Spanish tradition

posted 6 years ago in Latino
Post # 3
Member
2512 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

Many Latinos have a Madrina for special events in their lives (baptism, confirmation, quinceneras).

The Madrina should be present during the wedding and pay for something significant (your dress, your cake, the limo etc)

Traditionally, (my understanding at least) is that the Madrina should kind of be your maritial spiritual go to person. So if you guys are having any issues within your marriage, you should seek this persons help to guide you and help strengthen your relationship. 

Of course, there are so many countries within Latin America, so I am sure their role will differ from country to country. 

(we didn’t have padrinos for our wedding)

Post # 5
Member
2512 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

I think you should be picking anyone close to you and your Fiance that you respect and look up to. It doesnt have to be family. 

Post # 7
Member
2512 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

hahah ya that would be a little awkward. If you feel that this woman would be a good fit, speak to your Fiance about it. He may or may not have an issue with it. So explore and if it doesn’t work out, then keep on searching. 🙂 

 

Post # 9
Member
142 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Hm. I haven’t heard of Madrina for weddings. In a Catholic wedding; we have “Padrinos de Honor/Velacion” and this is a couple married in the church who can provide guidance and set an example for your new marriage. There’s also a few others like rings, coins, lazo, bible. They all have a special meaning…..

Post # 10
Member
10 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: July 2013

Ok first of all hispanic covers over 20 countries and each have different traditions. In Spain for example there is one madrina which is the only one that wears long dress everybody else will wear short dress. In Mexico there are padrinos and madrinas which is more to get people to get involved in the party all do it was originally to help with the expenses of the wedding. So you have somebody for the cake, music band, etc so that they take the bill. This is not the case in middle class weddings. So it depends of the country you are talking about it will be the meaning of madrina/padrino.

Post # 11
Member
5273 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2009

@Mcda04:  Yep, we have Padrinos for weddings – at least thats what my family has done for years.

My family’s take on padrinos are family members who gift towards the wedding – so for example, when any of my cousins get married, the parents will call the family and ask if they would like to be padrinos aka “sponsors” for certain aspects of the wedding.

Post # 12
Member
142 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@AnnieAAA:  Hi Annie, yeah some of my family still uses sponsors but it’s fading a little. The church padrinos are not so much for the expense of the wedding but for the guidance and support in your married life.

Coins: Symbols of prosperity and well being in your home.

Honor / Church: More like the witnesses. They will be the guidance and support in difficult times or in need

Lazo: Eternal Unity of the marriage.

Flowers:  The flowers symbolize fertility. usually a bachelorette good friend of the bride.

and so on. I personally don’t agree for “party” sponsors. I feel guests shouldn’t have to pay for a party for everyone I invite. It’s just personal preference though. I do have some family that got offended when they offered to pay for some stuff and we didn’t accept.

 

Post # 14
Member
570 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

@soontobemrsnapoleon:  Esta loca esa friend “just kidding” its not tradition though.  Normally when you get a madrina in my opinion is when you cannot handle the wedding planning financially.  

Where you will need is padrinos de bendicion.It will be a couple that is married and one whoms relationship you see is loving ,caring, and which to embody.  

Typically in mexican culture a madrina serves the purpose of purchasing items for you in which you give them thanks but I have only seen this in quinces.

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