(Closed) Spinoff: Dogs may accidentally kill babies but they also do THIS:

posted 10 years ago in Pets
Post # 47
Member
6397 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2014

Always happy to see a positive Pit Bull story. =)

One of my dogs is a Pit Bull. If we had someone break in, Judas would follow them around wagging his tail, trying to cuddle them. In fact they’d probably be so enchanted by him that they would end up stealing him also.

BUT he is a very sporty and driven dog, and he cant be trusted around strange dogs without proper introduction.

However one of my other dogs is EXTREMELY good with other animals, but doesnt trust people. Thats part of his breed though (he’s a livestock gaurdian breed.)

Post # 48
Member
1169 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

Dogs, like people, can be really good or really bad. Some are born with more aggression (not just by breed, by individual dog as well), and how they are raised can strongly affect aggression as well. When you decide to get a dog, do research and learn how to raise them to be the least aggressive you can get them, if you already have kids or have them after getting the dog, you need to do more research and teach both (dog and kid) to interact safely. How to do that can depend on breed, but small dogs and big dogs are both capable of inflicting really bad damage regardless of breed.

Personally, I’ve only ever been bitten by small dogs (I’ve had terrible experiences with pugs lol), while labs actually have such soft palates they can hold an egg in their mouths without breaking it (since they’re bred to retrieve rather than hunt).

Most domesticated dogs will never intentionally or seriously injure a person, but every person looking to get a dog should take the personal responsibility to train and rear the dog in ways that reduce that likelihood to the lowest level possible (research! research! research!)

Post # 49
Member
3054 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

My little guy surprised me the other night. I was sleeping on the bed with him and he started barking and growling! I have never seen that from him before. It was just my husband entering the door at 1 in the morning, after having to go pick up his dad from the airport. I guess it felt like it wasn’t right to have someone trying to get in the house that late at night? Before that I had seriously doubted his guard dog skills, I always thought he would just lick the intruder to death.

Anyway he jumped off the bed and ran to my husband growling, but then realized who he was. He continued to sniff his feet though just to make sure.

My husband was also laughing and was alittle impressed by it.

Post # 50
Member
134 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

Thanks for sharing! I hope the dog recovers fully!

Post # 51
Member
1472 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@Cady:  I understand what you’re saying and that obviously you don’t make the policies, but it can be really frustrating from the point of view of a responsible owner. I don’t necessarily think it’s fair to lump all people together who own a certain kind of breed of dog–I don’t think of myself as being representative of a larger group of pit owners, DH and I just have a dog who happens to be a pit mix. I know plenty of people who have aggressive poodles or yorkies, but they would never be automatically barred from living somewhere because of it.

Post # 52
Member
3054 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

@MM423:  Yeah, I am alittle confused why they wouldn’t take the dogs at all. I guess liability for the workers? Does the place not insure them? Are they not trained to handle animals at all?

Usually, it is policy to not take any dog that shows signs of aggression. Dosn’t matter the breed. If they snap at us, we won’t be taking them. We try to give them a chance, but if its to the point where we won’t be able to care for the animal safely then its a no go. The automatic ban for the “bully” breeds  is when it comes to them being in group playtime areas, but they do get individual care from the staff and they are allowed to stay. So I havn’t heard of that and I am sorry you had a bad experience.

Post # 53
Member
28 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: May 2011

love this! pitbulls are animal aggressive (if they are trained/bred that way), NOT people aggressive, unless understandably provoked!

Post # 54
Member
3015 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

It’s sad the dog suffered so many injuries, I agree this is an amazing and wonderful story. I love reading stuff like this Smile

Post # 55
Member
3457 posts
Sugar bee

@mija22:  Actually, pit bulls were traditionally known as “nanny dogs” because they were so good with kids.

Post # 56
Member
3457 posts
Sugar bee

@MrsSl82be:  Oh I see you mentioned it already!  I love pitbulls personally, I would love to have one someday 🙂

Post # 57
Member
5229 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: March 2012 - Pelican Grand Beach Resort

There’s a realyl sad reality to this demonization os so-called aggressive breads and that is that they become hard for loving, responsible families to adopt since so many apartment complexes, condo and ome associations, and even entire towns, cities, and counties often prohibit ownership. 

And, PS, why are huskies among that mix? I often hear that it’s because they are related to wolves, but genetically, they are no closer to wolves than any other dog. They simply look more wolf-like because of shared environmental pressures. I don’t think any dogs should be banned, but this one really confuses me because it is based, as far as I can tell, on appearance alone.

Post # 58
Member
3457 posts
Sugar bee

@mrsSonthebeach:  I agree no dogs should be demonized or deemed aggressive without it actually showing signs of such, but I have heard that huskies and malamutes are closer to wolves than some other dogs because they haven’t been designed as much through selective breeding. Since dogs descended from wolves, the reasoning is that pointy eared, thick coated large dogs are less domesticated than something small with floppy ears, like a beagle.

Post # 59
Member
5229 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: March 2012 - Pelican Grand Beach Resort

@SoupyCat:  That’s completely false, though. Siberian huskies and malamutes are no closer to wolves genetically than chihuahuas, and broke off from the wolf line when other domesticated dogs did. They only look like that because of their cold weather climate. Besides which, an adule male husky is maybe 65 lbs, which is WAY smaller than a wolf.

Post # 60
Member
234 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

I love positive pit bull stories. I’m so sick of the demonizing of an entire group of dogs, because of irresponsible owners. Pit bulls needs a strong but gentle owner and lots of exercise. I have yet to meet one pit bull that was responsibly taken care of that wasn’t the silliest, most friendly dog.

I have a pit mix and she was actually attacked at a dog park by a Golden Retriever! The dogs were both on leashes and the Golden came over to play so I let her run over and he snapped in her face and tried to latch on to her neck. My dog went and hid under a bench and had to be carried home. The one night my mom was watching my cousin’s toddler, and my dog followed her all around the house, playing with her, licking her, and standing next to her on guard while she played on the floor.She’s an absolute cuddle bug, and I can’t believe someone would think bad of her because of her breed.

 

Post # 61
Member
878 posts
Busy bee

@PinkPandaBear:  Theres a possibility that I’m wrong, but to the best of my knowledge American Pit Bull Terriers and American Staffordshire Terriers are technically two different things. At least in the US? I think in the UK they’re considered the same. 

The topic ‘Spinoff: Dogs may accidentally kill babies but they also do THIS:’ is closed to new replies.

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