(Closed) Spinoff: Grammar Tricks

posted 7 years ago in The Lounge
Post # 3
Member
1815 posts
Buzzing bee

Does anyone have something similar for then and than? I feel like I ALWAYS butchet that one.

Post # 5
Member
2872 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 2011

I love this thread idea,

yet I have nothing to add because I am a gramatically challanged.

Keep the tips coming! I need all I can get.

Post # 6
Member
1160 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

This is super random but when you’re driving horses (oxen I guess too) you use Gee and Haw for Right and Left. A way to remember which is which is to think of someone saying sarcastically, “Gee, right!” So, Gee is right and Haw is left.

Also my 3rd grade teacher taught us the difference b/t desert and dessert in that you gain weight eating lots of deSSert, not living in the deSert.

 

@AnneTossy: I used to use “SAmAnthA hAs wAy more Apples thAn me…”

Post # 7
Member
1488 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2012

I don’t have a story for it, but I always remember “together” as TO GET HER. I could never spell it right before a friend told me that.

Post # 8
Member
11325 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2011

@AnneTossy: I just always remember that “then” has to do with sequence and “than” is a comparison. I don’t know if that is really a “trick” though. 

Effect = outcome

Affect = to cause change

 

There = location

Their = possessive 

They’re = they are

 

Aisle = row between chairs

Isle = island

 

The thing I always have issues with is spelling. I am a terrible speller, and I’m the worst at knowing when consonants should be doubled. Like “accommodations” will take me 3 tries because I never know if the c or the m or both should be doubled. Or “embarrassed”… again a few tries. Luckily I can control+click (or right click on PC) over a word that is misspelled (oh it just took me two tries to spell “misspelled” because I missed the double “s”… the irony haha) and a list of options usually comes up. 

Post # 9
Member
7695 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2010

I before e except after C and the one thats weird

Post # 10
Member
5118 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

@AnneTossy: I remember it like the other PP mentioned: then is like next, and than is like rather.

it’s and its- I always say “it’s an it is contraction, its doesn’t own an apostrophe” since usually an apostrophe is a contraction or a possessive. 

I also remember the definition of affect as ‘to have an effect on,’ which shows me that effect is the noun, affect is the verb.

Post # 11
Member
206 posts
Helper bee

@PitBullLover: or when sounding like “ay” as in Neighbour or Weigh

And also being.

and either, neither, caffeine, codeine, counterfeit, foreign, forfeit, height, leisure, protein, their, weird, seize and seizure.

And Weimeramer.

 

Really it’s just a crappy rule. You just have to memorize your spellings.

 

Mine spelling was fine until I learned that rule, and I fixed all my words to follow it, including bieng. Then I fixed being, and broke all the other words I sed to be able to spell.

Post # 12
Member
19 posts
Newbee

Dessert vs Desert.

Dessert has the additional ‘s’ because it is sooooo delicious… or something like that – my memory sucks.

Or something my Mom mentioned from an old show is that the Principal is your “pal” to differentiate between principle and Principal 🙂

 

 

Post # 13
Member
2600 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

These are totally taking me back to elementary school 🙂

Post # 14
Member
853 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

gah! I love the TOM OR ROW one!

also, (dis)a (pee pee) in the ear = disappear (or appear)

besides the affect and effect one I posted in other threads, I can’t really think of any – grammar always came naturally to me, which is why I became an English teacher 🙂

Post # 16
Member
5118 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

**disclaimer** not grammar (which is ar, not er, grammer <-that’s how I teach it to people) but math:

When multiplying something by 9 (so 9×7), hold your 10 fingers out in front of you, count over to the 7th one from the left to right (so your right hand index finger would be 7). Put it down, and you get 6 one one side, 3 on the other = 63. 9×3 means your left middle finger goes down and you have 2 and 7 = 27.

*I hated multiplication tables, especially 7 and 9, but I never learned this until I was a TA and my 2nd grader was doing it. GENIUS!

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