(Closed) Spinoff: Prostitution

posted 9 years ago in The Lounge
  • poll: should prostitution be legalized

    yes

    no

  • Post # 46
    Member
    233 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: February 2012

    … 

    Post # 47
    Member
    4369 posts
    Honey bee

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    @BonbonBunny: If it were legal, then there could be laws about where the solicitation could occur. 

    Post # 49
    Member
    5147 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: June 2011

    RE: “One thing is certain, our views on sex have changed alot from grams and gramps!”

    And even now the USA is still pretty “prudish” compared to most Westernized nations on the topic of sex.

    Post # 51
    Member
    7774 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper

    So, you all made some very valid points in this thread so I went on the google machine and was looking into how it works in countries who do have it legalized. The one main one I could remember was Amsterdam, so I looked that up. Prostitution has been legal there for 11 years (it was legalized in 2000). Some interesting info I found (yes, this is from Wikipedia, but they have a ton of citations for it, so I am pretty confident in the validity of the information):

    21st century: reducing the size of the red light district

    When the Dutch government legalized prostitution in 2000, it was to protect the women by giving them work permits, but authorities now fear that this business is out of control: “We’ve realized this is no longer about small-scale entrepreneurs, but that big crime organizations are involved here in trafficking women, drugs, killings and other criminal activities”, said Job Cohen, the former mayor of Amsterdam.[7] Recently, officials have noticed an increase in violence centered on this irregular industry, and have blamed this increase on the illegal immigration of individuals into Amsterdam to participate in the sex industry: “The guys from Eastern Europe bring in young and frightened women; they threaten them and beat them”, said a resident of De Wallen.[7] Prostitution has remained connected to criminal activities, which has led the authorities to take several measures, including detailed plans to help the prostitutes quit the sex trade and find other professions.[18]

    In 2005 Amma Asante and Karina Schaapman, two councilors for the Labour Party (Netherlands), wrote a report, “Het onzichtbare zichtbaar gemaakt” (Making the Invisible Visible). Schaapman had once been a prostitute and was getting information about the influx of organized crime and violence into the business. Other reports came out around the same time. They concluded that a large number of prostitutes in Amsterdam were being forced to work and were being abused by pimps and criminal gangs, and that the goals of legalization were failing.[19][20]

    In response to the problems associated with the involvement of organized crime into the sex trade, the Dutch government has decided to close numerous prostitution businesses. Concerned about organized crime, money laundering and human trafficking, Amsterdam officials under Mayor Cohen denied the license renewals of about 30 brothels in the Amsterdam red light district De Wallen in 2006; the brothel owners appealed. To counter negative news reports, the district organized an open house day in 2007 and a statue to an unknown sex worker was unveiled, “intended to honor those employed in the industry world-wide.”[21] In September 2007 it was announced that the city of Amsterdam was buying several buildings in the red light district from Charles Geerts in order to close about a third of the windows.[22]

    At the end of 2008, Mayor Cohen announced plans to close half of the city’s 400 prostitution windows because of suspected criminal gang activity. The mayor is also closing some of the city’s 70 marijuana cafes and sex clubs.[8] This comes at the same time as the Government’s decision to ban the sale of “magic mushrooms” and the closure of all coffee shops situated near schools.[8] Nevertheless, Mayor Cohen has noted, “It is not that we want to get rid of our red-light district. We want to reduce it. Things have become unbalanced and if we do not act we will never regain control.”[8]

    In 2009 the Dutch justice ministry announced the appointment of a special public prosecutor charged with closing down prostitution windows and coffee shops connected to organized crime syndicates.[23]

    [edit] Proposed law

    A law proposal [24] was introduced in the House of Representatives of the Netherlands in 2009 and amended in 2010 which would ban prostitution by people younger than 21. Prostitutes are required to register; they receive a registration pass with a photograph and a registration number, but no name or other personal data. Clients are required to check this pass. In addition to municipal rules a national rule is introduced requiring sex companies to have a license, including prostitution companies such as brothels and escort agencies, but also, for example, adult movie theaters. Under the proposed amendments, an advertisement of an individual prostitute should contain his or her registration number, an advertisement of a sex company should contain its license number. The premises for public access of a sex company (if any) should have on the outside a sign showing that the company is licensed, while inside a copy of the license has to be displayed.

    The law (32211) was supposed to be voted on on June 22, 2010, but that has been deferred to allow both sides to examine it more closely.

    [edit] Human trafficking

    The Netherlands is listed by the UNODC as a top destination for victims of human trafficking.[25] Countries that are major sources of trafficked persons include Thailand, China, Nigeria, Albania, Bulgaria, Belarus, Moldova, Ukraine,[25] Sierra Leone, and Romania.[26]

    Currently, human trafficking in the Netherlands is on the rise, according to figures obtained from the National Centre against Human Trafficking. The report shows a substantial increase in the number of victims from Hungary and China. There were 809 registered victims of human trafficking in 2008, 763 were women and at least 60 percent of them were forced to work in the sex industry.[27] [28]

    Within the Netherlands, victims are often recruited by so called “loverboys” – men who seduce young Dutch women and girls and later coerce them into prostitution. The phenomenon was highlighted in 2008 by Maria Mosterd, who published a book about her ordeal as the 12-year-old victim of a loverboy.[29] The truthfulness of this book is disputed, and was the subject of an investigative journalism report. [30]

    Many victims of human trafficking are led to believe by organized criminals that they are being offered work in hotels or restaurants or in child care and are forced into prostitution with the threat or actual use of violence. Estimates of the number of victims vary from 1000 to 7000 on a yearly basis. Most police investigations on human trafficking concern legal sex businesses. All sectors of prostitution are well represented in these investigations, but particularly the window brothels are overrepresented. [31] [32] [33]

    At the end of 2008, a gang of six people were sentenced to prison terms of eight months to 7½ years in what prosecutors said was the worst case of human trafficking ever brought to trial in the Netherlands. The case involved more than 100 female victims, violently forced to work in prostitution.[34] In December 2009, two Nigerian men were sentenced to 4 and 4½ years in prison for having smuggled 140 Nigerian women aged 16–23 into the Netherlands. The women were made to apply for asylum and then disappeared from asylum centers, to work as prostitutes in surrounding countries. The men were said to have used “voodoo” curses on the women to prevent escape and enforce payment of debts.[35]

    Here’s the entire page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostitution_in_the_Netherlands#21st_century:_reducing_the_size_of_the_red_light_district

    Post # 52
    Member
    4369 posts
    Honey bee

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    @zippylef: Good article, thank you. 

    Post # 53
    Member
    1686 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: December 2012

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    @pinesey: THIS

    Post # 54
    Member
    1199 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: November 2011

    I say it should be legalized – prostitution is the oldest profession there is.  I just watched an episode of ‘American Greed’ that documented Joe Conforte and legalizing prostitution in Nevada, and I think the benefits to society outweigh the risks.

    Would I partake in it or think it was acceptable for FH to partake?  Of course not, but that doesn’t mean it needs to be illegal.

    Post # 55
    Member
    1088 posts
    Bumble bee

    I still don’t think it should be legalized.. someone said about how two people entering into a contract to have sex or something…

    some prostitutes are forced into the “business” they’re not there by their own choice…

     

    Post # 56
    Member
    360 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: January 2011 - Gardens of the World

    It is legal in New Zealand. And it hasnt changed anything for the better. Pimps still exploit prostitutes, prostitutes still get killed, abused, etc, there are still hardly any regulations…the list goes on. Legalisation hasnt empowered prostitutes here. It has just made them more vulnerable because the people who use them can get away with more. Oh and prostitutes are still ostracized here too.

    Post # 57
    Member
    1088 posts
    Bumble bee

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    @earrings: thanks for your post!! that is the reason on why I think it should NOT be legalized.. people will just be able to get away with more!!! and make it easier to not be punished for it. including child prostitution.. people make fake documents all the time and you could say a 16 year old is 18 and so on…

    Post # 60
    Member
    1088 posts
    Bumble bee

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    @SoupyCat: I know child porn isn’t legal. and I know if the law were to legalize prostitution , child prostitution would be illegal. my point is that if prostitution gets legalized, I feel like it’ll make it easier for child prostitution to occur and for prostitutes in general to be exploited. like earrings said on here about how it is legal in New Zealand and the same problems occur..

    I really HIGHLY doubt if prostitution was legalized that the pimps or whoever would be paying taxes on it… HA. really doubt it.

    The topic ‘Spinoff: Prostitution’ is closed to new replies.

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