(Closed) SPINOFF: things no-one tells you about having an interfaith marriage

posted 8 years ago in Interfaith
Post # 92
Member
6738 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2014

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@Moomin:  I wasn’t sure that you could still break the cup.  I thought the cup was a kiddush cup, so we wouldn’t have one to drink from.  But, I guess we could figure something out.  As for the baby things, I like your idea of keeping things in someone else’s house.  Perhaps that would be a fair compromise. And – I actually think it’s better to have baby circumsized by a Moyel – that’s all they do, all the time, isn’t it??  Dr.s circumsize less often and I have heard of non-Jewish circumsisions going badly.  I feel like Moyels actually have more experience.  I also feel like it’s really important to my parents.  But, I DEF want a baby naming ceremony if we have a girl.  I think it’s a really cool and fun tradition, outside of the religious aspect. 

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@AllTheGoodUsernamesAreTaken:  I never really thought about this – but we’re probably having a non-denominational secular wedding either at a destination or get a permit on a lake, etc.  Not actually in a JOP’s office, so I guess we could do whatever religion’s things we want to do, I hope!  I also wonder if the rule applies in the states.  Hrm.. more things to consider!!

Post # 93
Member
420 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 2013

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@futuremrsk18:  I’m not sure what rules apply in the states, because even though I’m from here, I’ve not tried to have an interfaith wedding here.  My understanding though (from talking to friends in the states) is that the rules about what you can and can’t do are a lot less strict in the states than in England.  I would think that asking your wedding planner (if you have one) or the place where you get liscenses from would be a good place to start to find out what’s acceptable and what’s not.  Your officiant would probably know what the laws are too, and also tell you what he/she is and is not comfortable doing.  Even if the law is very flexible with religous elements, your officiant might not be.  Maybe some other bee’s can offer better advice than me?  I wish you luck in planning the perfect ceremony though, and hope you don’t have too many challenges along the way 🙂

Post # 94
Member
6738 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2014

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@AllTheGoodUsernamesAreTaken:  Thank you – wishing the same to you!  I always knew it would be difficult, but I didn’t realize all the “little” things that I didn’t even think about before.  *sigh* It’s a good thing Fiance and I are good about compromising, but sometimes it can get a bit frustrating, especially since we’re not talking about just us 2, but our families as well – and while I’m a big believer that this is “our” wedding and we should do what “we” want, I also believe that we’re marrying the 2 families together and that it’s not just OUR celebration, but other people get excited and happy and want to celebrate, as well (specifically, the parents). 

Post # 95
Member
777 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

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@This Time Round:  Excuse me lady, but a) I don’t think you understood my comment, and b) where do you get off telling Jews what they should and shouldn’t believe? Regardless of whether you happen to think it’d be more convenient for everyone, mainstream Judaism does not and has never viewed Jesus as a prophet.

Perhaps if certain Christians stopped trying to dictate how people of other faiths should think, the cause of world peace, which you profess to be so concerned about, would be advanced.

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