(Closed) Spinoff: What sorority were you in?

posted 3 years ago in The Lounge
Post # 61
Member
299 posts
Helper bee

Alpha Gamma Delta โค๏ธ๐Ÿ’›๐Ÿ’š๐Ÿฟ

Post # 63
Member
582 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2017

goodasitgets :  litp girl!!!!!

adomke :  My fi is a TKE as well – you have excellent taste! ๐Ÿ˜‰ 

Post # 64
Member
1009 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: The Retreat at Bradley\'s Pond

Wow… super surprised that I think I’m the first one on the thread to say Chi Omega Fraternity (yes, like a few others we were originally founded as a Frat in 1895). We’re typically the largest women’s organization tieing with Girl Scouts at times for members. 

Sorority (and college) were a big part of our wedding as we still live in our “college town” yearsssss after graduating. 

Hankie from initiation in cardinal & straw. 

From pledge sisters, littles, childhood friends and sisters along the way…so blessed!

My husband doesn’t “GET” sorority stuff…but he loves a good sorority squat! (Yes I realize there was no real need to squat here, he just wanted to be funny). 

My candlelight or sorority singer during our reception…oddly something I’ve wanted at my wedding since I first joined. 

Post # 65
Member
140 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

How did you guys afford to be in one?

The biggest turn off for me when it came to these organizations are the amount of monetary investing one had to do. When you are already paying for college yourself, i can imagine extraneous expenses add up.

Post # 66
Member
140 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

bywater :  Me either. I really think it has to do with what connections/money you bring to the table.

Post # 67
Member
390 posts
Helper bee

Each college is different with dues. Traditionally southern schools are WAY more expensive than my school was. The girls cooked their own meals, etc. so living in the house wasn’t absurd like some sororities where you have to pay for a cook, etc. 

Also, I many times have likened being in a sorority to being on a sports team as I have been on both. You hang out together, you may play sports together, you recruit, etc. The same way you pay “dues” to “pay to play” on a sports team, pay for field time, jerseys, etc. you do the same in a sorority. 

Post # 68
Member
1009 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: The Retreat at Bradley\'s Pond

labellamerci :   labellamerci :  It actually has NOTHING to do with family connections or money. I lived 7 hours away and my connections “in” the sorority were girls I met in class semesters before. They didn’t let me in because daddy was going to fund some new refurbishment project. 

Some girls are paying for college themselves, some have family help. In my situation I originally wanted to do a semester abroad in college. When I approached my family about the sorority option they told me to pick one. I went with sorority as it’s a lifetime of experiences.

In some situations (not all) it can actually make life cheaper. My house was required to pay dues each semester- I don’t remember what they were but nothing crazy- these covered sisterhood events and materials from nationals. Most importantly I paid to cover utilities covered by the house- which I spent a lot of time in. When I moved into the house my senior year I paid roughly $900 per semester in housing. That’s pretty much $225 a month which doesn’t happen anywhere else. We also had meals included in our dues which were 3 full meals M-F. If you had class/work during our family style dinners then they fixed you a plate and put it in the fridge for you. I don’t remember the financial breakdown but it was cheaper than the on campus meal plan even at that time.

While it was harder for girls who were working full time to pay for the sorority- I saw girls who made it work if they wanted it bad enough and still got great grades. 

In the end, I decided to do a separate trip to Europe one summer with other friends (for 3 weeks so nothing small)- I took out a  loan to cover the expense as I was 21 then and as an adult it should have been my responsibility. It took me several years but I paid it off. 

All expenses and experiences were worth it. Not every chapter/school is the same and you saw that several mentioned not having an actual house on campus but for our school it was worth it for most girls. 

Post # 69
Member
1009 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: The Retreat at Bradley\'s Pond

adomke :  Perfection explanation! You don’t pay for your friends… you’re paying for the events in which you hang out with them.. you pay for the dinners cooked when you sit together and talk about your days. I technically consider FSU to be a southern school but by some standards it may not be regarding prices. But yes we had a beautiful house and several cooks, and “house boys” were we usually greek guys who were basically “bus boys”… they got fed the same meals we were, got a small amount of payment and usually always got asked to socials- so the guys loved it. 

Post # 71
Member
1009 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: The Retreat at Bradley\'s Pond

labellamerci :  ๐Ÿ™‚ Thank you… We worked hard to include so many aspects of our alma mater in our wedding since many friends who were attending had gone to school there as well and moved away.

Post # 72
Member
1273 posts
Bumble bee

I signed No Cuppa Jo.

Just kidding. My school didn’t allow sororities because they were afraid that they excluded people too much (Evangelical Christian). I doubt I would have joined one though, as I never knew much about them.

Post # 74
Member
345 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2016 - Presidio Log Cabin

tallahasseelassie :  I’m a Chi O too! Love your wedding photos. I just found my hankie for my wedding in December! XO

Post # 75
Member
9606 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2016

labellamerci : You’re not the first, and certainly not the last, person to think sororities are “paying for friends”.  There are a lot of issues with sororities, IMO, but this isn’t one of them.

I was the treasurer (well, they called it “Financial Vice President”) of the sorority I was in.  I quit the sorority after being in it for two years and am only in contact with one or two of my “sisters” and many of the others I would actively avoid speaking to if I saw them.  So I think I’m uniquely unbiased and informed when I say this:

You are not paying for your friends when you pay your dues.  You are paying for:

– the (themed) parties you go to every week or two.

– the “formal” and “semi-formal” parties you dress up for and go to a couple times a year.

– the house right on campus you can crash at whenever you want, and many girls also use as a study space, a storage space, etc.. (you pay extra if you actually live there, obviously, but I’m just breaking down where the dues went)

the only dues that were pretty BS were the fees you had to pay to the international head quarters of your sorority.  It wasn’t a big chunk, I think it was roughly $80 per girl per year, but I still felt it was stuipdly high considering not once did I actually see any direct benefit to paying them.  Though I suppose the house insurance was bought by HQ so maybe that’s where it went?

Oh and some money went to philanthropy.  The money didn’t go to charity directly: it paid for the fundraising events we put on to raise thousands of dollars for charity.  So I guess some people might consider that a waste.. but we didn’t.

I can honestly say, at least in my sorority, the dues were a really good deal for what you were getting–there’s a huge amount of buying power when 40 girls pay a few dollars a piece for a party.

Oh, and each year we sat down as a group and voted on our fees.  So we never had to pay for something (except for that $80 to HQ) we didn’t collectively choose to pay for.

 

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