(Closed) Stem cell collection and preservation

posted 8 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
14186 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

If your sister has any serious issues running down her line, like a disease that could pop up later and be debilitating, having stem cells would be ideal because they’d be a match automatically. Stem cells are pretty cool–they can differentiate into any type of cell in your body (depending on where they’re injected) and become that type of cell, weeding out the bad ones. 

I wouldn’t do it unless I were at risk for something, though-did her dr bring it up for a reason? Stem cells are amazing, though.

Post # 4
Member
1927 posts
Buzzing bee

I haven’t done much research on the topic but as long as the cost isn’t prohibative I am all about it.  Why not put something so amazing to good use.

Post # 5
Member
2410 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

Hmmm, I think I am against the storing of the cells with a private bank. I think it is much better to donate to a public stem cell bank. Consider the facts when it comes to genetic defects

Both the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued statements in the late 1990s opposing the use of for-profit banks — and criticizing their marketing tactics. Instead, they recommended that parents donate cord blood to public banks, which make it available for free to anyone who needs it. Globally, other organizations have done the same. Italy and France have banned private cord-blood banking altogether source

Private stem cell banking is pretty expensive (about $1000-2000) to collect the cells and a yearly fee thereafter to store them. If everyone donated to public banks it would increase lines available for research and allow for greater potential for matches without the need for private banking.

 

Post # 6
Member
14186 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

Would your sister be preserving the cord for her own child? or put it in the bank for others to be able to use?

Post # 7
Member
1927 posts
Buzzing bee

Hmmhh.. I don’t know if I could do the public bank thing.  What if I went to the trouble of having it collected and then donated it.. and then found out later that a family member was sick and could have benefitted from the cord blood if I have put it in a private bank?

Post # 8
Member
2410 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

That is the same fro donating blood or organs. We really should think about it similarly. Additionally, the chances of a family member being able to use one’s stem cells are a lot slimmer than we think.

Post # 10
Member
2410 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I know I’m a little forceful on the subject, but I have seen a lot of private stem cell banks just take advantage of people and take their money unecessarily. For example, if the baby was found to have a genetic defect, stem cells that have been banked will be useless as they will also carry the very same defect currently causing the problem.

Post # 12
Member
7082 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2009

This thread has a lot of info and the appropriate links.

Saving cord blood?

Post # 13
Member
37 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: August 2010

I work in stem cell transplantation. 

Private banking can be expensive.  There is also no guarantee that your child could use their own umbilcal cells in the instance that they became ill.  Some people need the healthy immune system of someone else in order to attack the disease that they have. 

Here are a few reasons to go with public banking:

-Umbilical cord blood transplantation has come a long way in the past few years.  It is being used more frequently (adults and children) and for more diseases.  If you decide to bank your baby’s umbilical cord, it may help someone in desperate need.  

-The cord that is donated will remain in the public bank and can be used by anyone.  If someone in your family needed the umbilical cord cells and was a match to that cord, it would be in the public registry unless it had already been used.  

-It is very important to know that even though a family member may need the cells, it is crucial that the stem cells are an HLA match.  Your family member may not be an exact match. 

The decision is ultimately yours, but do some research on the real benefit of private banking.

Post # 15
Member
2695 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2008

@MissStella – Totally agree!

To mandM – my mother is having a stem cell transplant in a few weeks and I have learned a lot about stem cells in the process.  Generally speaking, with current technology public banking is a much better option (and free) than private banking ($2K to collect plus storage).  If a family member is sick the liklihood of another family member being an exact  HLA match is very low (siblings are 1 in 4, parents, kids are virtually nil). The private banks are very savvy with marketing and make it sound like its really important – but most of what they say in their literature about the prevalance of stem cell transplants is through public banks or registries. 

FYI, even if I had my baby’s cord blood stored already, it wouldn’t be used for my mom anyways – she can find a much better match through a registry. 

Post # 16
Member
37 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@Janna19.

I wish your mom the best of luck!  It is a rough process but having a well educated, supportive family makes the process much easier.

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