(Closed) Summer Rules

posted 6 years ago in Parenting
Post # 3
Member
1249 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 1992

When I was that age, I had to do math/spelling drills every day, plus way more reading.  Kids regress so much during the summer.  The first month of school is spent relearning what you forgot over the summer. 

My parents own their own business, too, so I had to “work” for them two hours a day.  I got spending money, which was really nice.  It was mostly cleaning, some assembling trophies.  🙂

Your plan sounds good, though!  I know so many parents that don’t require anything like that during the summer.  🙂

Post # 4
Member
2104 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

Sounds like a good plan!  I saw a website called avoidthesummerslide.com that looked like it had some good resources, too.

Post # 5
Member
406 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

The only one I might loosen up on is number 5. If his day camp is primarily outside and high energy, as many of them are, his evenings might be a good recoup time.  He can read and relax so he has energy for the next day. 

Post # 6
Member
1501 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I think this is great. Keeping some structure throughout the summer to keep yourselves more sane going back to school. And it is not too much that he can’t have fun too!

Post # 7
Member
6825 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

I think they are good rules, though personally I would get rid of the video games period.  Children don’t need to be playing those when the weather outside is nice out.  They should be playing outside not playing video games. 

Post # 9
Member
3452 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I think the rules are fine, but what do you think his reaction will be to them?  I only ask, because you said there really haven’t been any rules prior to this.  Also, are you planning on making him read something before he writes a paragraph on Friday?  I think reading is the most important thing for him to do during the summer.

We don’t have rules persay, but all of our kids have something to do during the summer.  My sons are going to be seniors next year, they tend to have a lot of schoolwork to do in the summer, because they are in all honors classes.  They also just got jobs, so when they’re not doing schoolwork, they’ll be working.  My 10 year old daughter has a book list for the summer from school and she’s going to summer camp, so that will keep her busy.  My 5 year old actually has therapy all summer, because she has autism.  Really it’s like she’s still doing half of the “work” she does in school.  So everyone is pretty busy here.

Post # 11
Member
3452 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@kimberlyr22:  Oh believe me, 5th grade has changed so much since we were there!  My daughter is in 4th grade.  Sometimes, she asks me for help with homework and I am literally lost.  I kept saying there’s NO way I forgot this much!  This year, at a parent-teacher conference, I mentioned that I had trouble understanding my daughter’s homework to her teacher.  She said that wasn’t a surprise, because a lot of what they’re learning is different than what we did.  I didn’t feel so bad after that.  Haha!

I think you’re doing the right thing by making some rules to establish structure when he’s visiting.  If he’s got them at home, it’s good to continue that at your house.  Children need boundaries.

Post # 12
Member
2095 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I’ll be honest the only thing I can’t get behind is the journaling. To me that is a personal thing for someone to do and boys are a lot less likely to journal than girls are. And I don’t see why he has to do it twice. If it is something you feel is important then maybe just making him do it once might be a better idea.

Post # 14
Member
574 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2011

Coolmath-games.com is a really awesome website if you wanted to also add some math into his summer.  Maybe he could choose to play on that site in exchange for some XBOX time.  Does he have a good book list?  Scholastic.com has a Book Alike tool where you can search for similar books to what he’s already read and liked.  

Also, if he is going into 6th grade, you’ll want to have good, non-negotiable boundaries (like what you have!), but also make him feel like he has some choices too to build his independence.  Maybe collaborate with him regarding other options he would have for the summer (for ex – 1 hour of game time, could choose between these options; he needs to do these chores, but could choose to do these chores for cash, etc)  

You could say something like, “these are the rules that will be in place this summer.  Here are some options we will give you underneath these rules…” and then allow him to start making some choices.  Just a thought! 🙂

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