(Closed) Teacher Bees: Please respond! :(

posted 6 years ago in Emotional
Post # 3
Member
5148 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

Are you elementry ed? Unfortuantely elemetry ed teachers are a dime a dozen. My mom (teacher and school counseller) doesn’t recommend anybody go into elementry ed without at the very least getting a specialization such as speech therapy, etc.

A lot of schools are having budget crisises right now, so that’s another thing that will make it harder to find a job. A lot of schools are closing or consolidating.

One good thing is, though, is that currently you will be “cheap” to hire since you’re still pretty fresh out of college, so that does put you in a better position than some teachers that will be higher on the pay scale with years experience that are trying to find jobs.

Keep substitute teaching, that’s how my SIL landed her teaching job, they loved her when she subbed.

Post # 4
Member
262 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

Except for the nannying job, your situation sounds just like mine.  Although I did great academically and in my student teaching, I haven’t even been in for an interview since my position was cut last year. One problem I think is because I haven’t finished my Master’s yet and a lot of districts in the area like the presitge that come with having several teachers in their district with the title. I am taking courses towards a Master’s and a second endoresement (English as a Second Language). The more you are qualified to teach, the better the chances. You mentioned debt, but maybe you could take a few classes to make yourself a more attractive candidate (reading specilaist, high ability learner, another subject area, etc…) . Hang in there and good luck to the both of us!

Post # 5
Member
4824 posts
Honey bee

Special Education is an area that there is a need, Have you considered getting into that? but as PP said there are many teachers and not so many teacher jobs- especially in certain areas regionally as well as specialization (IE PE vs. Math). 

Also, I would ask some people to really closely examine your resume and portfolio. Those really make the first impression and get you the interview. Almost everyone’s resumes can get better. I would also ask the people you interviewed with, but didnt get the job to give you feedback on the resume and your interview. People often are willing to help out when it comes to this sort of thing. They even feel honored.

Post # 7
Member
4824 posts
Honey bee

@Ms.Sugarsnap:   That may be one of the issues. Many teachers (and many states require it) have graduate degrees which means they may be favored over you from the outset. They have a competative edge.

Post # 8
Member
1830 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

Yeah, trying to find a job in elementary education is bloody difficult!   Have you looked into the charter school networks?  They are sometimes more willing to hire brand new teachers.  Whilst the hours are longer and the pay generally less, they tend to be quite supportive environments and will provide excellent experience for you to build up your resume.   Good luck!

ETA:  Keep up with the substitute teaching – I know several people who ended up getting hired in school districts where they had been subbing.  They were really good subs, always coming in with extra plans and ideas of things to do, etc, so when a vacancy opened up in the district, they were already a known entity.

Post # 9
Member
362 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

I teach in New Jersey but was lucky enough to get in JUST before the job market tanked.  Massive budget cuts from our lovely governor (just my opinion!) have most districts working bare bones with very few extra staff members.  It is EXTREMELY difficult to get a job in the state.  I don’t know how attached you are to NJ but you might want to expand your job search to other states.

I also would not recommend getting your master’s degree before getting a job.  A first year teacher is a first year teacher regardless of the degree.  Without experience, you tend to be looked at as simply a more expensive first year teacher.

I would also recommend looking for jobs as an instructional assistant or maternity leave positions.  This can help you get your foot in the door and build a reputation for yourself in a district.  With the job market the way it is, some districts are hiring from within for teaching positions from their leave replacement or assistant pools.

I know it’s tough but good luck and don’t give up!

Post # 10
Member
7771 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

@Ms.Sugarsnap:  There are no jobs in my state either.  You may have to look around the country and be willing to move- are you already doing that?

Post # 11
Member
780 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: March 2012

Its a really tough economy in many fields, but especially education and social work…  Have you considered becoming a substitute or an assistant teacher?  As the staff get to know you and your work, they will want to invite you to apply for a position.  Also, consider a private school or a school affiliated with a church….  hang in there!

Post # 12
Member
4824 posts
Honey bee

@calypso0712:   That depends where you are looking for a job as well. In CT you are required to have a masters to teach (or be working towards one) My mom is a principal and with all the candidates out there she says she generally does not interview anyone without a masters because so many people have one. 

Post # 13
Member
1190 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

I feel your pain! I have been subbing for 2 years. They say the wait time on the supply list is about 6 years before getting a permanent position. Hang in there!

Post # 13
Member
1190 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

I feel your pain! I have been subbing for 2 years. They say the wait time on the supply list is about 6 years before getting a permanent position. Hang in there!

Post # 14
Member
2053 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

@Ms.Sugarsnap:  I’m sorry it has been so stressful. You do write something that is key and that perhaps you should see in a different light — that the reason you got that interview was due to someone you know setting it up. Continue to explore your connections and network, network, network. Personal recommendations, word of mouth, is a powerful thing. And yes, look at private schools, country day schools, Montessori etc. Keep looking, persevere, reassess your game plan, talk to everyone you know, and keep believing in yourself.

Post # 15
Member
2161 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

The job market is horrible here.  Teachers are waiting about 4-5 years just to get a semi-permanent contract. 

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