(Closed) Teacher Bees, I need your help!

posted 5 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
3170 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

I don’t know any high school boy who would talk like that, so immature. Are you sure he isn’t mentally challenged? I would do my best to ignore him and let him know that it isn’t getting to me. If he sees a reaction in you then it’s funny but he’ll get bored quickly if you aren’t acknowledging him.

 

Post # 5
Member
2163 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

He sounds exactly like the HS students at my school. I’d expect such behavior, they are looking to challenge a new face. I had similar behavior when I first started at my new school, and you just have to show them a take-no-shit attitude from the get go-you’re going to have to pick your battles. I had no reason not to say when I was a student teacher, it’s not like it’s something bad that you have to hide. I always find that when you treat some personal information as a secret, it becomes a bigger deal.

All my students know my first name, how old I am, my fiance’s name, and they respect me the same & call me Ms. _____________. The next time he calls you fart lady, I wouldn’t hold back a nasty response to him at all. I think I’d say something like “I’m sorry, maybe you’re confused, you will call me Ms. ___________, and if you chose not to, you will be getting a phone call home (you can call with your supervising teacher)” and I’d give him detention. When I first started, I had the same kind of kid you’re describing royally piss me off- I asked him if he needed help with something while I was circulating, and he said “Oh, you’re just a dumb blonde you probably can’t help me”…later, when he asked for help, I told him that since I’m just a dumb blonde, I can’t answer his questions, he should ask a brunette. πŸ˜›

I’d also try to conference w/the student-explain that you’ve shown him respect, and you will not tolerate him disrespecting you at all. I was very intimidated at the thought of HS, but many times, it requires kind of rolling with the punches and taking your guard down. My students don’t respond so well to me when I am super strict, but behave much better when I’m more relaxed and they can see I’m human too. For reference-I started out doing 1st grade, then went to 7th & 8th for 3 years, now I have been doing HS since March and it’s by far my favorite. Knowing your students is important, but I know I can say to most of my kids “Are you being serious right now, you’re annoying me and you need to stop”-and they do. Good Luck!!!

ETA-you should ask if you can begin teaching at least one lesson per week. When I was finishing up my student teaching (I did 4 6-week placements,and was an observer for the year before), by week 4 I was running everything about that classroom…even though you’re not full time student teaching yet, maybe try to grab the bull by the horns πŸ˜‰

Post # 6
Member
3170 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@MsBlackberry:  Having good grades doesn’t mean he isn’t mentally challenged. If he really isn’t though, just ignore him. My art teacher in high school was super laid back too and I was always listening to music. It didn’t make a difference in my art work though, it helped me concentrate.

I can see how it bothers you because you aren’t so laid back but try to just let it go and get through the placement and you’ll look back and realize you learned a lot from it.

If nothing else, could you talk to the principal about this kid?

Post # 8
Member
142 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

You need to keep a log (record) of every single incident and inappropriate thing that he says or does. If you have the documation of what the student did and then your response, things move a lot quicker to get help. You should then bring the list to your supervising teacher and they usually cant dispute it when you have specific dates and times recorded. The next step will be to give detentions and then phone home.

I have found that taking away the audience helps. Make him work alone in the hallway, or in a corner of the class facing away from others or better yet try to make a deal with another experienced teacher that will just have him working independently at the back of their class. I would speak to whoever has the best grade 9  or the resource department and have it so that you could send him there.

Things will get much better when it is your own class and you control the rules. Kids can be jerks but you and the other students deserve a positive learning enviroment where everyone is treated with respect.

Post # 10
Member
287 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

oy vey…I started teaching at 21 so I know how it feels.  My first year of teaching I had a few issues with respect from a male student…who insisted that he was going to find me on facebook, say that we were in a relationship, and follow me home to find out where I lived.  He also never addressed me as Ms. _______.  He just called me by my last name.  I pulled him aside about the name issue, and calmly reminded him that I am always respectful towards him, and that I expect the same amount of respect in return.  If the level of respect that I merited was not given to me, then we would have serious issues that would be addressed by calling home or talking to the principal.  When he threatened to follow me home and post that we were in a relationship on facebook, he crossed a serious boundary line which I first addressed with him and then brought to the attention of the principal because I wanted to let him know about this before any rumors started.  I never crossed any boundary lines, suggested anything, wore revealing clothing, etc.  I was just very young and he thought he could cross the boundary lines with me.  When he did, the problem was addressed by me speaking to him about respect and boundaries, me calling home to talk to his mother, and me letting the principal know about his behavior.  He never bothered me again.  

If I’ll be honest, my first year was rough with classroom management.  Most of my students respected and liked me, but I wasn’t good at managing them.  My second year I started to improve.  And this year (my third year), I don’t really have any problems with management or respect because I have learned how to set the tone of my classroom, how to establish my expectations, how to demand respect from the students, and how to hold students accountable for meeting my expectations.  It’s all a learning curve.

Post # 11
Member
287 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

the most important thing really is explaining your expectations and then letting them know when your expectations are not being met and reminding them of what you expect…which you should be able to do easily when the next semester starts.

Post # 12
Member
142 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

No matter your position, you are an adult in the school and there should be concequences for his harrassing and inappropriate behavior; however, I totally understand that with only a week left and an oblivious teacher, this seems like a battle you have lost πŸ™   But my best advice is always to document everything. You might run into this kid again if he is still in the school. Extracurriculars and such.

 But you should not feel embarrassed for his behavior, he should be the one to feel embarrassed. Honestly, the problem is coming from the teacher that is not supporting you adequately. I wish you were at my school where we have a very team enviroment where we deal with these types of issues together and you would have lots of options πŸ™‚ Good luck next semester. I am sure it will be a lot better and remember that the best thing about teaching is that everyday is brand new πŸ™‚ Best of luck!

Post # 14
Member
4867 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2018

I don’t have any advice better than what’s already been given, but I have to say that I think you’re very brave for tackling high school! I’m petite and young myself, and I refused to go higher than fifth grade. 

Post # 15
Member
1011 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2013

I’m a high school teacher and I know exactly what you’re going through!

I student taught at the school where I now teach and I got such little respect at first.  I think what has worked for me is to have that no-one-is-going-to-mess-with-me attitude and show them who is boss.

I too had a student that liked to challenge my authority.  He tried calling me by my first name and wouldn’t do the work I asked.  Only when I threatened to flunk him did he stop.  I also took him into the hall several times (with another teacher so I couldn’t be accused of saying something innapropriately) and spoke to him about his attitute.  He played sports and since he was in a class that he had to pass in order for him to play, my grade meant a lot.

Sounds like the real teacher has already done a disservice by introducing you by your first name and having a very unstructured class.  You have to be pro-active and take charge and let these students know they won’t get away with their behavior.  You will gather much more respect then playing down to them.

I have a reputation of being a tough teacher and I like it that way!

Post # 16
Member
9917 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

He does not sound “mentally challenged” at all.  He sounds like a jerk.  What does your supervising teacher say about his behavior?

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