(Closed) Teacher bees & Pregnancy/Pumping

posted 6 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 3
Member
733 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

hmm interesting.

I am not a teacher nor pregnant but I’m curious too.

Post # 4
Member
277 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

I’m a teacher and I just found out I’m 5 weeks. I would love to hear the answers to this! We have one teacher that pumps in the teachers lounge but the other teachers make fun of her so I don’t think that is a good idea. 🙂

Post # 6
Member
4049 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: January 2014

Commenting so I can come back and follow this. Future teacher here, and will be a mom SEVERAL years down the road, but I have wondered how it’s done!

Post # 7
Member
580 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I’ll be 10 weeks at the end of this week and so far, the hardest thing for me has been a lack of energy. It’s hard to work all day and then go home and work on paperwork at night when all you want to do is crawl into bed. I will say though that my Principal has been amazingly understanding so far about all the extra Dr. appts and stuff. I had a horrific stomach bug at 7 weeks that kept me out for 1 1/2 days…would have been MUCH longer if we hadn’t been on fall break immediately following that. 

Post # 8
Member
4464 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: February 2012

I’m not pregnant myself, but my husband and I do have a plan for TTC starting this August. Of course, there are no gaurantees that everything will go according to plan, but I will be starting to chart ovulation in February, as that is our one year wedding anniversary and we definitely did not want to TTC before the one year mark. So anyway, my plan is to be pregnant for the entire course of this coming school year. I would like to get pregnant (if all goes well, hopefully) in August/September and continue on with the school year until May/June. I know that the end of my pregnancy will probably be stressful and perhaps it may be a little hard to get around (waddle waddle), but as it coincides with the end of the year, it may not be too bad since the majority of the curriculum will be behind me. My mom worked as a teacher – even itinerant during the winter months in Illinois which is a huge pain – through both of her pregnancies. She worked up until past her due date with me, even though I was born in June. I believe she had no problems really, but I know that everyone’s pregnancies are different and I can only hope to have it smooth, as well. By the way, my sister and I both have May/June birthdays because we were specifically planned that way. Maybe not something everyone wants to know about themselves, but it’s become fairly obvious in light of my plans now.

As far as pumping, I worked with a woman last year who needed to pump during the day. I’m not sure if she only did it at the end of the day or she utilized other plan breaks, but I don’t think that once a day would be enough, especially if the baby was born over the summer and is possibly only a few months old (I think this teacher’s daughter was already close to a year old and the teacher was no longer exclusively nursing – the baby was eating baby food). Since that was a special education environment there were aides who could take over, but I would highly suggest speaking to your principal or supervisor when the time arises about what can be done for your needs. The school should take measures to accommodate you and hopefully you can work out a schedule that suits your needs.

ETA: As far as the uncomfortable aspect of it – frequent urination, exhaustion, etc. – I think it’s a hurdle that any working pregnant woman has to deal with. It’s going to be a pain to have to work while pregnant, regardless of the job,  but teaching poses certain other difficulties, like exerting yourself with the kids, standing all day long and not being able to go to the bathroom whenever you want. You have to find ways to cope, like structuring your teaching style so you can sit down more, or developing a relationship with a nearby teacher or a co-teacher who can help cover your class for a few minutes here or there while you go to the bathroom. As far as exhaustion, it’s good practice for when the baby actually comes and you’ll be even more exhausted. You have to learn how to make the separation between work life and home life, setting goals for when you are going to go home every day and take care of yourself instead of working late to get planning or grading done and tripling your exhaustion. Especially since once a baby comes, priorities in the home change, and the baby does become more important than taking the papers home to grade. If you get into a successful routine during the pregnancy, it won’t be as hard to adjust once the baby comes. (By the way, the same woman I mentioned above, she did talk on the first day of school last year about how, after being on bed rest the previous year, she needed to shift her priorities from constantly stressing about school and grading papers, etc. to realizing that when she’s home she needs to take care of herself and her family and she’ll be more rewarded and productive in both school and home.)

Post # 9
Member
1482 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

I would honestly check your state’s laws for working breastfeeding mothers who need to pump. Depending on your state, they are obligated to not only accomodate your need to take breaks to pump, but in some cases provide you with a private place to do so that is not a bathroom.

I’m not a teacher, so I unfortunately do not have any real world advice on how to deal with scheduling pumping breaks around a school day. Maybe right before school/lunchtime/planning period/right after school? I think there is a blogger over on HelloBee who is a teacher who recently posted about going back to work, and she does something similar to that. I think she locks her classroom door and pumps under a nursing cover. Once you would be going back to work, your LO would probably be going 4 hours or so between feedings, so your body would be adjusted to that schedule.

I agree with everything star_dust said about being pregnant and figuring out how to deal with it at work. Also, keep in mind that pregnancy does not always make you exhausted or sick. I actually felt fan-freaking-tastic my whole pregnancy (people used to joke that I was totally Brooklyn Decker’s character in “What to Expect When You’re Expecting)- I had high energy, I never once threw up, I worked out throughout my pregnancy… I don’t think I’m all that unusual either. I loved being pregnant, I ran around in cute maternity dresses and high heels and thought it was great. So, you might be the same way. 🙂

Post # 10
Member
2104 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I’m a teacher due in February…so I can’t answer any pumping questions yet, but I’m told that they’ll work with me.  I also lucked out and had the bulk of my morning sickness over the summer holidays–I was 13 weeks when school started.  However, I did have a scare at 14 weeks from being on my feet so much.  I’ve had to learn my limits and when to sit down…luckily, second graders are eager to please and “help take care of the baby.”  I’ve managed the fatigue well, but joint and back pain can get ugly.  We took a field trip to the zoo yesterday and I’m still hurting from being on my feet all day!

Post # 11
Member
570 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2009

I just had my first week off from teaching fifth grade! I’m 35 weeks with twins, which is why I was out early. The beginning wasn’t too bad, despite the frequent bathroom breaks- I have a very close relationship with my next door neighbor teacher and would just stick my head in his room with a pathetic look on my face, and he’d watch my class while I ran to the bathroom (you can see both of our classes when you stand in the hallway). I was exhausted, yes, but I don’t think that it’s too different from any other job- you have to get through it, so you do.  As for morning sickness, I just kept up on my snacks (which really helped) and puked in a garbage can every now and then. When I got really big at the end, I sat as much as possible (which still wasn’t a lot- my ankles got so swollen, when I sent my husband a picture of them he said the looked broken). 5th graders are fabulous helpers, though!

 

As for the pumping, I obviously can’t give any personal advice but there is a woman at work who pumps right before school, during recess, during her planning, lunch and directly after school.  Her first son was 3 months old when she came back. 

Post # 13
Member
385 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2009

@KatieLu:  they make fun of her? How awful!

I each 2nd grade. I got pregnant last January & worked through all of the first trimester & some of the second before summer break. I went back to work for about 5 weeks before my due date; now I’m on maternity leave until January.

Working in the beginning wasn’t too bad – I constantly eating saltines & drinking ginger ale. I remember being REALLY tired & falling asleep as soon as I got home, waking up for dinner, & then going to bed for the it. At about 3 months, that passed & I was back to feeling “normal”. As for bathroom breaks, i would call the front office & one of the secretaries would come watch my class for a few minutes. The last few weeks though we’re hellish. I was physically uncomfortable & spent most of the day sitting on an exercise ball. The kids were amazing & kind & thoughtful, though!

Im not pumping yet, but I can’t imagine they’ll have the personnel available to cover for the extended period of time it takes to pump. I plan to feed in the am, maybe pump before the first bell, pump at lunch, pump at the end of my plan period, & after the final bell (these times are roughly 2-3 hours apart, which is about how often DS eats). I have a corner of my classroom that is pretty well hidden if the door is closed, so I plan on just pumping in my room.

Post # 14
Member
540 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

We are going to start trying in February of next year.  I am especially worried about how I will leave work at work, since I teach 12th grade British Literature.  If I left work at work, I would never finish grading, planning lectures, or reviewing college essays.  I am already concerned about how I will be a great mom and a great teacher.  The other English teachers didn’t work after having children, so I am at a loss for advice from my co-workers.  I teach at a private school, so it is easier to leave class to throw up and pee.  I am currently working with two teachers who both plan to Boyfriend or Best Friend.  I will not be BFing after I give birth.  The only private rooms we have are storage closets, so they will have to pump there and put a sign on the door—everyone has internal keys, so they could totally be walked in on without the sign.  One of my coworkers was nauseated and fatigued the entire first four months.  It was all she could do to get through the day.  Teaching is exhausting enough anyway, so it was no walk in the park.  The other teacher, other than frequent urination, felt fine.  I don’t know how I will handle it if I am sick during a pregnancy.  I am so rarely sick (maybe once a year) and am the worst teacher ever if I feel like crap.  The bad thing is that we don’t get maternity leave; we have to deplete our sick and personal days and then take days for no pay.  We can take up to three months without getting let go, but most teachers can’t afford to take that many days off or have ended up using those days while pregnant and sick.

Post # 15
Member
277 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

I just dont think they like to watch breasts being pumped while they are eating their lunch. i think the bathroom would be a better place for that.

Post # 16
Member
413 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

I am a kindergarten

teacher and will TTC in about a year.  So I’m just commenting so I can check back on this post later.

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