Tell me about your job!

posted 4 months ago in The Lounge
Post # 2
Member
896 posts
Busy bee

I never thought about what goes in to being a medical transcription isn’t, but that’s interesting!

 

Post # 3
Member
643 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: February 2018 - UK

What’s your job title?

Mine changes, at the moment it’s IT Support Trainer

 

What kind of environment do you work in?

I’m based in an office within a large corporation, but I work on all the IT equipment in the company, so I could be in the factory, server room, any other office or any other site.

 

What is it that you do, exactly?

I’m part of a team who look after all IT equipment across the company. PCs, laptops, tablets, phones, printers, copiers, you name it. I fix any issues, hardware and software, maintain and install new systems, etc. It ranges from password resets, to researching and implementing £100k new systems. I also train users on various systems.

 

Are you full or part time?

Full time

 

What do you love most?

I love problem solving, taking something that’s broken and fixing it. I love helping people, getting them back up and running when something is stopping them doing their job. I also love that it’s impossible to stagnate in this industry, there’s always something new to learn, new technology to try.

 

What do I hate most?

I could certainly do without people calling me and yelling because somethings broken, when it turns out to be their own stupidity – they’ve spelled their name wrong or not plugged something in. 

 

Advice for anyone interested in this field?

Keep up to date with the latest technologies and development. Also, never forget that people skills are key. You can be the best engineer in the world, but if you can’t extract information from someone who’s completely computer illiterate, or calm down someone who’s panicking because they’ve lost all their work, this isn’t the job for you,

 

Post # 4
Member
1479 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2019 - City, State

Fun thread! 🙂

What’s your job title?

I’m a book editor.

 

What kind of environment do you work in?

I own my editing business so I mostly work from home, and I have my trusty laptop so I can work while traveling as well.  But I do also work for an industrial supplies company doing indexing and other linguistic analysis, so I’m in their office a few days a week as well.

 

What is it that you do, exactly?

I do copy editing, developmental editing, and manuscript evaluations for all sorts of different books.  Lots of different fiction genres, as well as a good chunk of nonfiction.  There are a lot of different types of editing that all have separate purposes and functions, so honestly a lot of my job is also making sure that authors know what kind of editing they need and understand what it is I’ll be doing with their book (and NOT doing).  I also offer side services to evaluate and edit agent query letters, synopsis letters, etc.

 

Are you full or part time?

Uh….it depends on how much work I have, haha.  I suppose I’ll say “part time” since I have another gig, though.

 

What do you love most?

A lot of people think editing is just fixing commas and grammar and it’s inherently really boring, but there is SO much creativity involved with it.  Pondering things like word choice, syntax, pragmatic choices, organization and flow, character development arcs, etc. are all REALLY fascinating to me.  It’s also really just so fun to see what kind of stories people come up with.  It doesn’t happen often, but when someone writes a book that really surprises me, it’s SO much fun to read and to work on it.  I love getting to see “the inside of people’s heads,” if you will.  Their thoughts, wildest visions, issues that are emotional or meaningful to them, etc.  You learn a lot about a person from the stories they write.

 

What do I hate most?

I’ll be frank: a lot of authors suck.  There are a lot of ignorant, tone-deaf, or otherwise untalented people out there who think they’re going to become millionaires with the terrible book they’ve written.  Some people are just hopeful dreamers and that’s fine, but some people are convinced their book is AMAZING when it’s one of the worst I’ve seen in years.  Unteachable people are mega annoying and honestly I often reject their books because they’re not worth the time or money.  They don’t understand that I don’t get paid to compliment people; I get paid to tell you (politely) all the things that are wrong with your work.  There are also a lot of amateur writers who get hung up on stupid things, like they’re terrified I’m going to steal their idea and write it into my own book before they can publish theirs.  Trust me: we don’t want your idea.

 

Advice for anyone interested in this field?

Know what you’re doing, and know your strong points.  If you’re not really strong in character development, then do not try to make your way into developmental editing.  If you’re really good with the technical side of editing but not the creative one, then don’t go into working with fiction.  There’s nothing wrong with being a technical editor only (someone who works on manuals or textbooks); there’s actually a lot of money there.  If you don’t have the knack for something in particular, then don’t try to force it.  For example, I am not fond of proofreading.  The teensy nitty-gritty details, the pressure of it being the last round, etc. are not my favorite things, so I don’t proofread.  I don’t enjoy it and I’m not the best at it, so I don’t offer it as a service.  I have a friend that does not touch fantasy or scifi books because she doesn’t get it.  It’s not her jam and she thinks they’re weird, so she rightly sets a professional boundary for herself because she knows she can’t do them justice.  Also, a lot of people who want to go into editing think it’s just being good with English – editing is not just knowing good English grammar and common homophones.  You have to have in-depth knowledge of the writing process, an appreciation for individual language use, and a host of other things.  You have to be VERY flexible, not prescriptive.

Post # 5
Member
1118 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2019

Very cool thread!

 

What is your job title?

Academic Advisor

 

What kind of environment do you work in?

I work in an office enviroment, at a higher education institution. I have my own office inside of the college I’m assigned to (we have four — STEM, Liberal Arts, Nursing & Health, and Business).

 

What is it that you do, exactly?

I assist students with academic planning, degree/program requirements, career exploration, transfer options, and applying for graduation. I also give referrals to college resources and specialized departments within the school, and provide outreach and guidance for at-risk students.

 

Do you work full time or part time?

Full-time August through April, part-time in the summer.

 

What do you love most about your job?

It’s extremely rewarding. I also love my schedule — typically 8am-4:30am Monday through Friday, and part-time hours in the summer.

 

What do you hate about your job?

The pay is low (but the benefits are great!).

 

What advice would you give to others interested in a job like yours?

Things are always changing at the higher ed level, almost nothing stays constant, so you have to be patient and adaptable. There is also a HUGE documentation piece to my job, and written communication skills are a must — you have to keep a record of every single student interaction, direct or indirect, which can be time consuming. Speaking of time, time management skills are also extremely necessary. There will be times when you only talk to 3 students in an 8 hour day, and times when you have back-to-back appointments and can’t take a lunch. Prioritizing tasks is important (documenting or performing outreach during down time, etc.). And last, it can be a very emotional job, and compassion is essential. You become almost a mentor to your students, and you end up doing so much more than academic counseling. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had a student cry in my office (happy or sad tears), and how many times I’ve done it myself. Always have tissues handy. 🙂

Post # 6
Member
1892 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2017

What’s your job title?

I’m an Associate Chemist (hoping to be promoted to Chemist I soon!)

 

What kind of environment do you work in?

I work in an R&D labratory

 

What is it that you do, exactly?

I formulate, color match and test industrial paints for large equipment (Tractors, crains, etc.)

 

Are you full or part time?

Full Time

 

What do you love most?

Color Matching. It is an art and skill that most people struggle with, but I am damn good at. 

 

What do I hate most?

All the time it takes to make Paint. It can take me 2 days to make a paint, and if the color is off I have to start over….

 

Advice for anyone interested in this field?

Coatings is an extremely tight knit group. If you get into a large coatings company, you’re in coatings for life if you like it. Its hard, confusing, frustrating, but also extremely interesting. Its nothing like chemistry in school. At. All. You have to think on your toes. 

Post # 7
Member
2 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: July 2019

What is your job title?

Utilization Management Nurse

 

What kind of environment do you work in?

Currently in an office setting, but will be able to work from home in a few months.

 

What is it that you do, exactly?

I receive requests for inpatient hospital stays, surgeries, imaging (CTs, MRIs, PETs) and review for medical necessity against guidelines using patient information or charts submitted to me by MDs and their office staff.

 

Do you work full time or part time?

Full time

 

What do you love most about your job?

I love being able to help patients without the stress of working in the hospital. 

 

What do you hate about your job?

I miss moving around and being active on the job. I sit at a desk all day. 

 

What advice would you give to others interested in a job like yours?

You should have a foundation working in direct patient care First. And you really need to be detail oriented and able to read, process, and clinically apply medical information quickly in order to work the cases by the deadlines.

Post # 8
Member
704 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012 - Iowa

Fun/interesting thread! I’ve love reading them all so far.

 

What is your job title? Graphic Designer / Graphics Manager

What kind of environment do you work in? Small heavy equipment sales company, <20 employees total, very casual which I like.

What is it that you do, exactly? Working for a small company, I do a variety of things! I designed a 500 page catalog for a parts company my boss started, design brochures, business cards, advertisements, etc. I manage our websites, take equipment photos, answer phones. I also manage a division of the company that sells specialty parts. I get to design for outside clients at times, and do some freelance design as well.

Do you work full time or part time?  Full time, 8-5.

What do you love most about your job? I love the small company I work for, the casual atmosphere. I love getting to take photos and move around (vs. sitting on my desk all day), I LOVE designing although I don’t get to do a ton of it anymore.

What do you hate about your job? That I don’t get to design much anymore! It can also be slow at times which can be really boring! The day goes so much faster when I’m busy.

What advice would you give to others interested in a job like yours? Be flexible, especially in a small company, you have to be able to wear many hats.

Post # 10
Member
1433 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: City, State

What is your job title?

Professional Nanny

What kind of environment do you work in?

I work in private homes.

What is it that you do, exactly?

I provide a safe, caring, educational, and nurturing environment in which children grow and develop.  Basically, I pick up where parents leave off. I have started typing some of my responsibilities, but the list got too long. Just picture what a parent does, and know that I attempt a seamless transition. 

Do you work full time or part time?

I work 50-60 hours per week (too much if you ask me).

What do you love most about your job?

I love the kids. Honestly, I love them. Sometimes, tears form in my eyes and I feel like my heart is going to burst from all the love I have for these tiny humans. I love watching them grow and develop into kind and productive members of society.

What do you hate about your job?

My job is extremely emotionally taxing. I feel like I give all of myself to these families, and I don’t always get to reap the rewards. For example, I don’t always get to see piano or dance recitals we have worked so hard perfecting. I don’t always get to share in the joys of getting a perfect grade on a test we studied for together. I am in no way saying I deserve these things over the parents. This is definitely par for the course with being a nanny, but that doesn’t make it easier to deal with. The hardest thing, by far, about being a nanny is when the children grow up and don’t need you anymore. 

What advice would you give others interested in a job like yours?

Be educated! Know your worth. Childcare is expensive, but having a nanny is a luxury, not a right.

Post # 10
Member
1451 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2018

What is your job title?

Radiation Oncologist

What kind of environment do you work in?

I spend 3 days per week in a clinic in a little town where we have one radiation treatment machine. There are also two medical oncologists (the kind of doctors that give chemotherapy) that share my clinic space. It’s really nice because all of the patients that come here are oncology patients, so they don’t have to worry about sitting in the waiting room next to someone with a cold, given that many of them are immunosuppressed from their treatment. I spend the other two days of the week in a radiation department in a nearby major city hospital, where we have three radiation treatment machines and a procedure room.

What is it that you do, exactly?

I see patients with cancer and prescribe radiation treatments for them. Sometimes these treatments are the primary cure for their cancer, sometimes they are extra treatments after surgery that improve their chance that the cancer won’t come back, and sometimes they are strictly palliative to improve symptoms they are experiencing. I design the radiation treatments, and evaluate the patients who are undergoing treatment for any side effects or other issues during treatment, and then I follow them after their treatment (usually for years) to evaluate for any recurrence of their cancer or side effects from their treatment. I work with their surgeons and medical oncologists closely to develop the best care plans for them.

Do you work full time or part time?

Full time, with after hours and weekend call a few days per month as well

What do you love most about your job?

That I get to help people through some of their toughest times. That I get to use high tech equipment. That I get to work with other smart, motivated clinicians. That my job is hard and requires me to think and problem-solve.

What do you hate about your job?

Sometimes my patients don’t do well, and I have to tell them I can’t cure them, or the treatment didn’t work as we had hoped it would. Sometimes I have to tell them there’s nothing more we can do.

What advice would you give to others interested in a job like yours?

Work hard in college. Get exposure to clinical medicine as early as you can. Take an MCAT prep class. Study HARD in med school and crush the US medical licensing exam. Then be ready to spend 5 years after college and med school working hard in residency for very low pay. The road is LONG, but the career at the end is awesome and I am so happy I followed this path.

Post # 11
Member
1979 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

What is your job title?

Line cook

What kind of environment do you work in?

A hot kitchen, lots of stress and yelling.

What is it that you do, exactly?

i cry in the walk in cooler…..lol

i cook for stingy tourists, who apparently think they are better at my job then i am…. 

Do you work full time or part time?

full time

What do you love most about your job?

When i worked in a higher end kitchen, i loved the creativity of it, we had a revolving menu of new foods, products, tastes. It was awesome. 

Also the family atmosphere, most cooks, chefs are putting in major overtime, you live at your job, so you tend to become close friends with most your coworkers

What do you hate about your job?

the hours can suck sometimes, and you can kiss enjoying holidays goobye for awhile in most restuarants ive worked. 

What advice would you give to others interested in a job like yours?

You must have thick skin! some chefs and even coworkers are going to intentionally be the biggest a-holes to you, the pressure to perform at 100% and be perfect depending on what kind of kitchen you work in can be overwhelming. You will break from time to time, when i worked in my first high end restuarant i will admit there were a few tearful car rides home after work. 

my other advice would be to think long and hard if this is what you want to do, the pay can be pitiful depending on where you work, it took me 10 years to get to a decent pay rate.  its extremeily competitive, everyone wants to one up each other and everyone wants to be the boss of someone. But the reward of doing your job perfect at the end of the night and knowing your crushed it, is a great rewarding feeling. 

Post # 12
Member
156 posts
Blushing bee

hickoryhills :  how did you get into editing? I love to edit others’ writing and while I write and edit a lot of things like pamphlets and one pagers and emails going to a large group for my current job I’d love to make editing longer works my primary job. 

Post # 13
Member
1479 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2019 - City, State

dizzybee130 :  I’ve studied language systems and use for a long time, so I suppose that was the beginning of it.  My undergrad degree was in Linguistics, and then I went on to get my grad degree in Creative Writing.  Also reading a ton and reading extremely broadly is essential, because you have to get an understanding of what works and what doesn’t in books, and be able to explain to people precisely WHY something doesn’t work.  If you can’t explain it, then you’re a worthless editor.  I suppose my career started when a friend from grad school asked me to edit her book, which had already been picked up by a publisher.  I was able to start networking through that and build my business step by step.

Post # 14
Member
957 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2019

I’ll answer for my “day job”, but I also am a private yoga & meditation teacher (set my own schedule, work from studios or client’s homes).

 

What is your job title? Client Happiness Manager

What kind of environment do you work in? Work from home. I do my work remotely via telephone and computer.

What is it that you do, exactly? Client intake and education for a career coaching company. I take phone appointments with people who are frustrated or confused about their career, I listen and empathize with them, I tell them the ways we can support their career growth and development. I also do some digital marketing and support tasks, but the bulk of my work is client-centred.

Do you work full time or part time? Full days Monday-Thursday and half days on Friday.

What do you love most about your job? Working from home – I can work in yoga leggings all day, my dogs have tons of attention, I don’t have to worry about commuting. I love helping people and I feel that my work is fulfilling and genuinely helping people who are struggling. I like working in a small team and not in a large, corporate environment. Our approach includes mindfulness practices, which resonates with me, since I’m also a trained yoga and meditation teacher.

What do you hate about your job? Very low pay, if I want to stay in this company there is not currently room for advancement.

What advice would you give to others interested in a job like yours? Evaluate if this type of job is the right fit for you – you need to be able to have boatloads of empathy, listening skills, and be able to calm people when they are upset. I think most extroverts would have a hard time working from home full-time, so assess if that is a good fit for you. You need self-discipline to get work done when you are working by yourself.

Post # 15
Member
420 posts
Helper bee

What is your job title?

Finance Manager.

What kind of environment do you work in?

When I started 5 years ago there was 7 of us, just me and my dad in the office, now there is 26 of us in a large building 5 of us in the office. This is a very close knit family business, I have since started dating the Sales Manager, My Dad is the Owner, My step-mum is HR, My second Dad is the Operations manager, My little brother is a CNC Machinist, my Uncle is head of dispatch, I have cousins that work out the back. HAH it’s a big ol mess.  

What is it that you do, exactly?

I ensure all money going in & out of the business has a job.
I process all payments, receive all moneys and enter it all onto an accounting system.
I do goverment lodging for taxes & other accounting jobs that our accounting business we pay to do the big stuff doesn’t do.
Process all pays and manage all staff within my area.
act as mediation between all the family members depending on how relationships are going.
just general making sure the business is earning money & keep and eye on that via reporting.

Do you work full time or part time?

Fulltime hours(Mon-Fri Wednesdays off) & full time study

What do you love most about your job?

The family atmosphere & flexibility, I have a long list of chronic health issues so being able to go to appts or duck out or work from home If I need to is really great. 
My pay & perks are fantastic, I have very little outgoing costs in my real life which is nice.
My job is really a bunch of to-do lists on repeat forever, and I am ALL ABOUT LISTS.

What do you hate about your job?

Working with family can be H A R D work. There is always going to be someone you upset and everyone takes everything personally rather than it just being apart of having a job. Not being able to leave work at work and home at home. Maybe sometimes the numbers can make you go crazy, when you’ve been starting at a credit card statement for 4 hours because you can’t find where someone has missed 0.2c on an payment it makes you want to tear your hair out HA.

What advice would you give to others interested in a job like yours?

A job like mine would be the same where ever you go (minus the family drama), it’s numbers, it’s checking everything makes sense and balances. Every cent must have a job, must know where everything is. Attention to detail is a MUST and organisation skills.

Leave a comment


Find Amazing Vendors