Tell me about your job!

posted 5 months ago in The Lounge
Post # 16
Member
2491 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

What is your job title?

Labor and Delivery RN

 

What kind of environment do you work in?

Hospital

 

What is it that you do, exactly?

I take care of patients on our Labor and Delivery and our Antepartum units, so I care for laboring/delivering moms, moms dealing with pregnancy losses, traige patients to decide if they can go home or need to stay, and patients that are having pregnancy complications (preterm labor, preeclampsia, hyperemesis, etc.).

 

Do you work full time or part time?

Full time- 36 hours a week. Usually 3 12 hour shifts/week.

 

What do you love most about your job?

I love when I have patients that I can truly bond with and appreciate my help. Makes my job worth it! Also helping moms successfully breastfeed for the first time is especially fulfilling to me.

 

What do you hate about your job?

Dealing with difficult patients can be, well, difficult. We are also short staffed a lot, which is very tiring and stressful. Bad outcomes are rare, but it’s especially hard to see moms dealing with losses. I feel honored to help them through the difficult time but it’s so sad.

 

What advice would you give to others interested in a job like yours?

Shadow a nurse and see what it’s like actually working before going to nursing school. It’s a lot harder and more exhausting than some people think. Also for L&D in particular, it’s not all rainbows and playing with babies. When we have emergencies, they are true emergencies, and our bad days are REALLY bad. But overall, it’s very rewarding! Seeing a new dad cry when he first sees his new baby is one of the sweetest things in the world. I wouldn’t want to do any other type of nursing.

Post # 17
Member
4509 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

hickoryhills :  Yay for another editor!

 

What is your job title?

Managing Editor

What kind of environment do you work in?

Office with lots of cubicles. I’m lucky enough to have a real office with a door. We have about 120 people on-site full time + interns and such.

 

What is it that you do, exactly?

I copyedit (and occasionally rewrite) articles for a monthly nonprofit magazine (80-120 pages long); communicate with authors; handle all editorial management of the publication; oversee our proofreader; coordinate with our design, ad sales, and production partners; coordinate social media promotion; and various other related tasks.

Do you work full time or part time?

Full-time; occasionally, when my schedule allows, I freelance, as well (books, articles, website content, resumes, you name it. Mostly copyediting with some light developmental editing and the rare content creation thrown in). Right now, I only take jobs from current clients – I don’t have time to take on any more.

What do you love most about your job?

I actually really love editing, and when a author tells me that I made him or her sound so much better or really got what they were trying to say, it makes me happy. I also like working in the nonprofit arena and knowing we are making a difference every day.

What do you hate about your job?

Well, I like deadlines, but I HATE when other people don’t respect them, which is chronic here. If I tell you I need X by Y date, I didn’t just make that up out of thin air. I don’t like working harder or later because someone else doesn’t do their part. 

I am very good at saying “no” to content that is unsalvegeable or problematic in ways that cannot be edited out (I work in a very sensitive field), but I hate authors who try to go over my head when I reject their articles. It never works, but it irritates me to no end. Having buddies in high places doesn’t mean I’ll publish you.

What advice would you give to others interested in a job like yours?

Understand what it means to really edit. It’s not proofreading classmates’ papers or correcting typos (though, granted, you need to fix those, too!). You need to dive into a writer’s head and make the paper say what they were thinking; you need to know all the rules and, more importantly, when to break them; you need to know how to take one person’s words and make them resonate for the entire audience; you need to be able to take jumbled ideas and organize them in way that works for the reader… and you have to do all of this and more without losing the author’s voice.

(I love it, but it drives me nuts when people think I just correct grammar.)

Also, if you want to work for a nonprofit, make sure you have passion because you’ll never have wealth.tongue-out

Post # 18
Member
10675 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: City, State

hickoryhills :  

As a nonfiction author, please allow me to say that I adore you. 🥰🥰🥰

A good editor is worth, well, I’ll think of something stratospheric in value.

Post # 19
Member
930 posts
Busy bee

hickoryhills :  When I finsih my fictional, fantasy/dystopian book, will you help me edit it for potential publishing? It’s just a recreational novel I began writing; nothing serious. 🙂

Post # 20
Member
930 posts
Busy bee

I help mitigate my clients’ everyday risk exposure. 😉

 

Post # 21
Member
1578 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2018 - Location

What is your job title?

Secondary school teacher

What kind of environment do you work in?

A high school

What is it that you do, exactly?

Teach lessons, evaluate work, communicate with adminstration and parents, supervise clubs, etc…..

Do you work full time or part time?

Full time

What do you love most about your job?

Interacting with students! Also I love the autonomy of being able to do what I want in my classroom.

What do you hate about your job?

The paperwork – marking is the absolute worst. Sometimes I resent having such a rigid schedule – can’t work from home or roll in late some mornings because of a dentist appt then just say I’ll put in more time later. Of course I appreciate the holidays but not having vacation days means I always have to travel during expensive school breaks and can’t just randomly take a week off for a last minute deal. Stuff like that.

What advice would you give to others interested in a job like yours?

You won’t know until you try it!

Post # 22
Member
313 posts
Helper bee

What is your job title?

Architect

What kind of environment do you work in?

Co-director of a small design-led practice, and we work in a co-working space of a very whackily designed office building (lots of plants). We’re basically surrounded by other start ups.

What is it that you do, exactly?

Everything. We mostly design high-end (ish) houses or do renovations for private clients. I do concept designs, techncial designs, all the drawings, obtaining all the relevant permissions, presentations, client meetings, managing projects generally, managing other consultants (eg structural engineers), researching things (materials, products, etc), talking to suppliers, getting quotes from builders, managing building contracts, checking works on site, etc.

Then I also do all the things related to running a business like meeting potential clients, writing fee proposals, doing invoicing, keeping on top of the accounting, PR (branding, graphic design, website, press, publications).

Do you work full time or part time?

Full time, roughly 9-5.30 five days a week.

What do you love most about your job?

Being able to be creative, physically realising something that previously only existed in my head and knowing this will be around for 100+ years. Improving people’s lives through design – nothing like a happy client. Also being my own boss.

What do you hate about your job?

Some people don’t realise the level of skill it takes do this job well (there’s a reason it takes 8 years to qualify). Everyone has an opinion on design but that doesn’t mean you can do it well – trust the expert, that’s what you hired us for. Also, it can be a thankless job, the pay is crap compared to other people in the industry and we do A LOT of work behind the scenes (particularly a lot of management) that people aren’t really aware of. Also, the responsibility of having your own business can be annoying sometimes. Like not being able to go on a long holiday. 

What advice would you give to others interested in a job like yours?

You have got to be VERY organised and also be good with people. Also, how you cope and how well you do at university has zero bearing on how well you actually perform on the job. Just try and absord as much as you can when you’re studying and don’t worry about the grades.

Post # 24
Member
1256 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2016

 is your job title?

Management consultant

What kind of environment do you work in?

Large global firm. I work at the HQ office now so we have both consulting staff but also alot of the regional and global support staff so it’s a nice mix in the office.

What is it that you do, exactly?

  honestly it changes every project. At the highest level, I work in a team with other consultants to help executives of big corporations solve problems – usually around growth, cost management, organization design, or designing/executing large transformations. 

On the day to day this usually means quantitative analysis, making presentations, and having client meetings to understand the problem, come up with recommendations/courses of action, and then communicating these to the clients at various management levels.

Do you work full time or part time?

Full time on steroids

What do you love most about your job?

Boredom is not a word heard in my job. I also get to work with incredibly smart colleagues and am exposed to all sorts of industries and different types of really large scale problems that companies deal with. It’s also neat to see execs meet and understand how they think about their industry, their corporate strategy, internal politics, etc.

What do you hate about your job?

We change projects every 4-6 months on average which means figuring out how to work with a whole new team in a new industry with a new client on a new problem. I’m someone that needs to feel like I really understand my situation and am solid in my working relationships to feel confident so I dread new project start up periods.

There are also the usual consulting complaints of long hours, frequent travel, not having much say in who I work with (team wise and client wise).

What advice would you give to others interested in a job like yours?

You have to be somebody that can easily adapt to working with a huge variety of people and working styles. You have to be able to handle constant feedback (we have professional development meetings with our managers almost bi-weekly). Tight deadlines, constantly changing work scope/deliverables, frequent iterations of Excel/PowerPoint outputs – if you like predictability you’ll hate this job. 

Understanding how to best recharge,w you want to be a consultant and what you’re hoping to get out of the job are key to avoiding burn out. 

Post # 24
Member
127 posts
Blushing bee

What is your job title?

I’m a PC/POS Engineer

What kind of environment do you work in?

I work in a warehouse with my own little corner shut off to myself. With a larger office attached to our warehouse unit. It’s a fairly large Uk company. 

What is it that you do, exactly?

My company provides tills, PCs, pumps and controllers for petrol forecourts. If an engineer on me can’t fix a till (POS) or Pc, receipt printer or power supply it gets sent back to me and I fix it. In our department we all have different specialities (Pinpads or controllers. So on) so I’m the only one in my department that handles tills, PCs and peripherals for tills. 

Do you work full time or part time?

Full time! 37.5 hours a week

What do you love most about your job?

I work on my own. My manager trusts me to do my job so I don’t have any interruptions. I can work all day with my headphones on listening to music or audiobooks or YouTube. I also work flexi hours. So I can show up anywhere between 6 and 10 in the morning and as long as I do my hours no one cares. 

What do you hate about your job?

Other departments aren’t very clued up on what we do or how our individual department works and thus their emails and requests are usually not correct or confusing. At that point I have to track people down and actually tell them what I do and what they’ve worded or presumed wrong. 

What advice would you give to others interested in a job like yours?

Really enjoy trouble shooting and have a love for puzzles. Sometimes something comes to me and I spend hours trying to work out how to fix it. But it’s enjoyable because that’s the sort of person I am. Also have no fear of getting dusty and really getting stuck into a PC. 

Leave a comment


Find Amazing Vendors