(Closed) Tent Cabins in Yosemite and the Hantavirus

posted 6 years ago in Travel
  • poll: Staying in a Tent Cabin in Yosemite right now
    would be out of the questions for me : (15 votes)
    68 %
    would be scary, but I'd go : (0 votes)
    I'm super brave and that doesn't scare me off! it's a RARE virus : (7 votes)
    32 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    747 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: June 2013

    I would definately do it but I also hiked part of the Appalachian Trail and also have backpacked in Montana. I love being outdoors!

    Post # 5
    Member
    10367 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: September 2010

    It’s not THAT rare in CA, actually. 6 people confirmed infected in such a short amount of time is a big deal. The confirmed cases are realllllly skewed towards coming from CA vs the rest of the country. I work in antiviral drug development – we are watching this closely.

    I’m actually going to Yosemite this weekend, but we got a great Air BnB deal 25 mins outside of the park – cheaper, cleaner, quiter!!

    Post # 7
    Member
    10367 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: September 2010

    @MissFireFlower:  Look on Air BnB, not just at standard hotels. We got an $85/night cabin with a full kitchen, two beds, etc. 25 mins from the park. You can also do backcountry camping in the national forests around Yosemite for free. Way less crowded (the reserved camping is SUPER loud and cramped for most of the year).

    I’ll email you the link to our cabin when I get home – my husband booked it :-). WHen are you thinking about going? I can PM you next week to let you know how the stay was.

    Don’t knowingly put yourself in the hantavirus hot zone!

    Post # 9
    Member
    10367 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: September 2010

    @MissFireFlower:  Just edited my response but you were super fast :-). I’ll PM you the link to the one we chose later!

    Post # 11
    Member
    116 posts
    Blushing bee
    • Wedding: June 2013

    1/3 of those who are infected with the virus die. Those are pretty bad odds. You become infected by simply breathing particles of animal feces or secretions, so its not like you can do anything to avoid it, except staying away from areas where it is endemic.  Although it is a rare virus, I wouldn’t take a chance staying there right now since they’ve issued the warning.

    Post # 12
    Member
    42 posts
    Newbee
    • Wedding: November 1999

    I wouldn’t mess with the hantavirus. Even though it’s fairly rare to catch, it has a high fatality rate. And, unlike a lot of diseases, hanta can easily kill a young healthy person. 

    Post # 13
    Hostess
    11167 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper

    We go twice a year (summer and NYE weekend) and live about three hours away so I have a few thoughts.

    The cabins that have been affected thus far are the “special” tent cabins not the basic ones. These have an extra layer of insulation which was being used by the mice for nesting. The basic tent cabins (slightly cheaper) are single layer of canvas and if you aired out the tent I can’t imagine there being an issue.

    What is the date you are looking to book? The camping reservations must be canceled two weeks prior to your arrival date and every year without fail I can guarantee that we will get additional spots two weeks before arriving. People always cancel due to the 8 months and 1 day pre-booking window and of course plans change. Log on recreation.gov and check several times a day, you just might find something. Make sure if you are planning to stay several days that you keep the reservations to two to three nights at a time. Otherwise if you look for lets say 7 nights the chances of fnding something are slim to none…you will probably have to move sites during your stay.

    Do not rely on day of walk-in camping reservations. The line forms at the break of dawn with backpackers/rock climbers etc and can be dozens deep.

    If you absolutely must stay out of the park Oakhurst is a terrible idea, the drive is long and windy. You will spend most of your trip driving back and forth and during the weekend with day visitors it can take HOURS to get out of the park. Even if you are coming up the 41 I would recommend staying somewhere on the 140 (El Portal is closest and easiest to get to…about 45 min drive).

     

    Post # 14
    Member
    48 posts
    Newbee
    • Wedding: August 2013

    Hi there!

    I’m a Yosemite bride and my wedding is next summer, and the Hantavirus has definitely been weighing heavily on me as well, so I can relate.  I believe the park has closed the Tent Cabins in Curry Village, and considering that’s where almost all of the people contracted it, I’d avoid it.  As far as where to stay, camping is probalby safest since people are using their own equipment so it’s not possible for deer mice to settle in anywhere.  I bet you’d be fine camping in the valley, maybe at a large campground like Lower Pines.

    The Redwood cabins located in the park are a really nice option if you’re looking for something other than a hotel.  They are privately owened and pet-friendly and have kitchens and other helpful amentities. Although they are on the pricey side, you can rent four bedroom cabins and get a good number of people in them so you don’t have to pay quite as much.  Here’s a link: http://www.redwoodsinyosemite.com/ 

    Also, you can book campsites in Yosemite exaclty five months in advance.  What my Fiance and I are doing is going online the day sites become available and just reserving tons of sites, including the group ones, so our guests can stay there and pay us back later.  You must be sure to login the hour that sites become available, I’ve tried booking sites a day after the window opened and every site in the park was booked!

    Good luck and feel free to PM me if you have any other questsions!

     

    Post # 15
    Member
    243 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: July 2013

    Hantavirus is so overblown. I’d stay in the tents and I wouldn’t call it brave. You’re more likely to catch and die from the common cold than from Hantavirus, and if you’re healthy and not extremely young or old, the chances of that are next to nil. 

    Really, don’t worry about it. 

    Post # 16
    Hostess
    11167 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper

    @mrsplanner:  Just reading through your post and a few things caught my attention that I thought you should be aware of:

    1). You don’t book exactly five months in advance you have a single day (the 15th of each month) to book within your desired window of arrival. If you are planning on staying from August 15-September 14 you need to call or book online (recreation.gov) anytime after 7am on APRIL 15th. As someone who goes twice yearly I can guarantee that the park will be entirely sold out of campsites within 15-20 minutes. If you log in around 7:30 am you might find yourself out of luck, especially for a weekend date in August. It is a an all out battle to get sites in the summer, I know very well as our family has been going every June for the last 30+ years.

    Hotel rooms and the cabins actually run by the DNC book exactly one year in advance.

    2). Not sure if you are aware of it but the cabins you suggested are probably a 90 minute drive from the actual Valley floor. During the summer and on weekends this drive can take close to three hours depending on the time of day. It once took me over an hour to drive my grandfather from Yosemite Village to Camp Curry around 5 pm on a summer Friday.

    3). When you log in you get exactly seven nights total to book within the summer per log in username. If your guests are only staying one night (lets say August 23rd) that feasibly means you can book seven campsites for one night. If they are staying say two nights (August 23rd and 24th) you can only book three campsites and so on. You are not allowed to book an endless amount of camp sites and group campsites using one user name.

    To by pass this you will need to log out and log back in (costing you precious time during the reservation window) OR (what my family does) have multiple usernames and people logging in and reserving for you at the same time with the hopes that you will get what you need.

    A little secret….people can cancel camping reservations two weeks prior to arrival date. This means that around August 9th people will have to cancel if they plan on doing so for your desired arrival date (going by your suggested wedding date again) and if you check in frequently on recreation.gov you can snag a few spots. I am usually successful with this on a yearly basis but again it requires diligence in checking.

    Anyway perhaps you know all this but I figured it might to be helpful to someone. I am a pro when it comes to Yosemite thanks to my family’s obsession with it so anyone is welcome to PM me and ask me questions.

     

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