(Closed) TEST: Are you really that diamond colour sensitive?

posted 7 years ago in Rings
Post # 32
Member
3194 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@MrsBlueSeptember:  ooh fun!

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Post # 33
Member
3194 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@Someday_Mrs_Maguire:  

@housebee:  

@heathuhhhhwebbbb:  

apparently i am like, super color sensitive. i wonder in real life what another color diamond would look like next to mine. too bad i can’t just roll up on people and be like HEY WHAT COLOR GRADE IS YOUR ROCK

Post # 34
Member
8439 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

too bad i can’t just roll up on people and be like HEY WHAT COLOR GRADE IS YOUR ROCK

 @TwoStatesBride:  LOL, I bet you’d get some strange looks

Post # 35
Member
2093 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@Arshim:  “Why pay thousands for a factor that can hardly even be noticed once the  diamond is set?”

Answer: Because sometimes people want they want. 🙂 It’s their money…why does it matter?

 

I don’t see much “discrimination” on here about warmer stones but what I do see is a lot of Bees who have warmer stones get offended (?) when someone comments on the warm tones or says anything other than “it looks pure white”. Personally, if one loves their ring, then that is all that matters! Thanks to WB I have seen stones that are less than half a carat that are stunning to ones that are larger than 3 that aren’t so hot. I think it’s just a matter of opinion.

And I guess throw me in the camp of “missing the point” of this post, because I was about to start guessing colors! LOL

My ring is a color that isn’t even listed. I can tell you that when I was in the store, I could definately tell a difference because I asked to see so many stones in different ranges. Ultimately, we picked my stone based on some other specs, but I prefer a coolness in my ring that other stones didn’t have. It was just something I preferred. I don’t feel “gypped” because we chose something like that. And personally, I can see how some women would look at it and just think it’s not for them. To each his own. 😉

Post # 36
Member
6290 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2014

@Arshim:  I don’t think anyone missed the point TBH; people were simply saying that they can tell in real life, but not from a photo, which is completely different; you can’t really compare the two.

I’m not massively interested in how my jewellery photographs, but I am bothered about how it looks in real life, as I don’t sit and stare at photos of my ring, I look at it on my hand. I can roughly what colour a diamond is in real life by looking at it, as I said above, and personally, am not keen on diamonds that are G/H/I etc; I prefer D/E/F coloured stones. If I were ever buying another piece of diamond jewellery (I’d like a new diamond pendant, and also eventually an oval or pear RHR), those are the colours I personally would get, as I’d be able to tell the difference, and would prefer those colours.

Post # 37
Member
6354 posts
Bee Keeper

@Arshim:  Because some of us can notice. My diamond is set, and I can still tell.

And many people buy in a hurry, not realizing that imperfections in their diamond will become more and more visible to them the longer they have it. It’s the back of your hand… you WILL be staring at it day in and day out.

What is a barely visible tinge when looked at for 10 minutes in a jewelry store’s parking lot by someone not overly familiar with diamonds, can become an “in their face” discoloration over time. It’s best to be neurotic as possible when choosing, and never buy sight-unseen or based on what it looks like under unnatural (jeweler’s lights) lighting conditions! Flaws and discoloration will not get “better” over time, psychologically.

Post # 38
Member
6290 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2014

@joya_aspera:  Yup, totally. That’s exactly how I felt when I was looking; while in the store it didn’t look THAT bad, the fact I could notice at all concerned me. I just know that after a full day wearing it, it would bug me.

My current ring is H-I coloured and I can totally tell. It’s even worse next to other pieces of jewellery, which is why I’ve gone for D coloured stones for the custom re-make. I’m confident I’ll be able to tell the difference.

Post # 39
Member
6637 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: February 1997

Regarding colour shade test, I took one to get my job. I tested in the top 5% of the population as far as distinguishing colour. However, as other posters have pointed out, that has next to nothing to do with diamond colour sensitivity. I am not nearly as good at distinguishing, say, a D from an E. Anyone can notice the difference when a G is next to a D, and some people are more sensitive to tone even when their stone isn’t next to a whiter one. And again, settings, lighting, cut of the stone, etc. can all factor in as well.

There is no right or wrong answer as to what colour stone is “white enough” (or yellow enough, for that matter, when it comes to FLY diamonds). It depends on the person and the ring. Many people WANT a warmer stone, while others are fine with something in the near colourless range, while still others are willing to pay for the icy white of a D, E or F.

If all of the stones in the OP were in front of each of us in person, I am willing to bet that many people could easily distinguish which are whiter and many of us would have distinct preferences as to the look of each stone, even when not compared to the others. It isn’t accurate to say that a stone’s colour doesn’t matter once it is set; indeed, sometimes the setting will either enhance or whiten the stone. It DOES matter, and it is a factor many people are willing to pay for. If colour isn’t as discernible to you, then that’s fantastic and allows you to purchase a stone for thousands less; but it IS noticeable to many other people in their own rings and I don’t think it is foolish to pay the premium for a whiter stone for someone who is sensitive to it.

Post # 41
Member
422 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2006

@This Time Round:  I love this chart. The fact that I can barely tell the difference between the D and the L (and even less so if they were set) will save me TONS of money on my shiny new ring. I don’t mind warmth, at all, and have told Darling Husband to go with an H, I, or J. As long as it’s clarity is good (eye clean) and the cut is good, I’m happy. 

Post # 42
Member
422 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2006

@MrsBlueSeptember:  Oooh a 14 (Female), pretty snazzy, considering I can’t really judge stones (D-J all look basically the same to me). Or maybe I just am not bothered by warmth.

Post # 43
Member
9950 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2012

TO @Susanlee178:  There are other charts out there, that show the shading differences for each Letter, but I like this one too, because just like there are charts that show the differences in Clarity as groupings… (bottom to top)

Included

I3

I2

I1

Slightly Included

SI2

SI1

Very Slightly Included

VS2

VS1

Very Very Slightly Included

VVS2

VVS1

Internally Flawless

IF

Flawless

F

This one groups by Hue / Warmth (bottom to top)

Light Yellow = Z thru S

Very Light Yellow = R thru N

Faint Yellow = M thru K

Near Colurless = J thru G

Colourless = F thru D

Of course as pointed out by other Bees, there are indeed slight variations within the groupings, and IF someone has a good eye then I suppose they’d be able to pick out a G Diamond from a J one, or a D from an F

But for the most part, people cannot do that, and certainly not at a passing glance, which is how most people will see the Diamond in your ERing on your hand.

My first Marriage and my “Feature Stone” was around 0.25 C and H Colour, I Clarity.  And it served me quite fine for over 20 years.  No complaints.  Eventually one’s Marriage becomes more about the Marriage, Kids, etc, and a lot less about the Engagement & Wedding memories… as time moves forward.

This time round… Mr TTR & I are Encores, and an older couple (I am over 50, he is over 60) we are semi-retired, and unlike when we both were married previously as folks in our youth, we come at this Marriage from a different mind-set / place in life (lol, like not being fresh-faced 20-something Uni Grads with NO assets) so with no kids at home, and no great bills to speak of (no mortage etc) we were able to spend more on my Rings as we saw them as more of an “investment” piece.  Consequently, the fact that my ERing has a “Feature Diamond” that is an F Colour, and the rest of the Diamonds between my two sparkly rings (ERing & WBand) are Gs.  Which puts them all on the cool & clear side.

As I’ve said countless times on WBee, there is NO RIGHT OR WRONG in this.  Choosing an ERing is a personal preference sort of thing, and with soooo many Cs to consider…

CARAT SIZE – CUT (Quality & Shape) – COLOUR – CLARITY – CERTIFICATION – CONFLICT FREE / CANADIAN – COMFORT – and COST

EVERY COUPLE has to figure it all out for themselves and what they wish to make a priority, and what they are willing to compromise on.

I think too many Bees are set in thinking that THEIR WAY is the ONLY WAY, and that is sad.

 

Post # 44
Member
6637 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: February 1997

@This Time Round:  “I think too many Bees are set in thinking that THEIR WAY is the ONLY WAY, and that is sad.”

I could not agree with you more. Different people have different priorities and preferences and sensitivities. As long as each of us sees our rings or stones as just right for us, that is all that matters. 

Post # 45
Member
422 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2006

@echomomm:  Yeah, as long as it’s shiny, I’m happy. I’d probably wear tin foil if it was styled in a nice way. ;p

 

Post # 46
Member
3638 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

@Arshim:  

WOW! I can’t believe how “low” they are (expect 5 of course). Ring 2 certainly has some colour in it to me, but the others I could not tell. 

I don’t think that I’m colour sensitive, which is great because it means that that’s where I can make a lot of compromises in that area when the time comes. I DO think though that if you are going to have side stones etc, they should be a similar colour to the centre stone. Otherwise you have whiter stones next to a “darker” centre stone and it can highlight that warmth. 

That being said I actually like warmth in a diamond (when I can notice it!), I just don’t like warmth next to the “ice” of a whiter diamond. 

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