(Closed) Thanksgiving Turkey Recipes?! Share yours!!!

posted 8 years ago in Food
Post # 3
Member
661 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

Brine!!!!  I don’t have a recipe because I buy a premade package of brine, but brining is key! 

Post # 5
Member
661 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

@Lees4308:  Hmm, I think she’s brining it too long.  I’ve always heard never to brine more than 12 hours because then it gets too salty.

Post # 6
Member
617 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2009

I second brining!  I have never had a more moist turkey than one that has been brined!  I don’t have a recipe for it but there are plenty online you can use. 

Post # 8
Member
1820 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

This is how I make mine.  Note that this is just a standard (but delicious!) turkey – no special theme or anything.  On the brining question, I have done it some years and not others.  If your turkey is less than 20 lbs., I really don’t think it makes a difference.

Completely thaw turkey in refrigerator.  Even a fresh turkey will be extra-extra cold (and some parts could be frozen) because grocers have much colder refrigerators than regular houses.  Once thawed, take turkey out of refrigerator and let warm up a bit (maybe 30 minutes?). 

Unwrap turkey and discard any giblets, neck, excess fat, etc.  Thoroughly rinse inside and out with cool water and set turkey on a clean, large cutting board, breast-side up, large cavity facing you (the legs – not the wings – should be closest to you).  Pat dry inside and out with paper towels. 

“Refresh” your turkey by squeezing fresh lemon juice inside and out and rubbing the juice around.  This will brighten your flavors and get rid of any bitterness left behind from the giblets.  Seasons generously – again, inside and out – with salt and pepper.

Stuff the turkey, if you do that.

In a small-medium bowl, soften butter (amount depends on size of turkey, but at least one cube).  Add chopped fresh herbs (I use copious amounts of Italian parsley and thyme, but you can add whatever you like), salt and pepper.  Mix together to form a paste. 

Working CAREFULLY, use your hands to gently separate the skin from the meat.  Slather 2/3 of your butter mixture under the skin of the turkey, working to coat the full breasts and legs.  Slather the remaining 1/3 of your butter mixture on top of the skin. 

Place your turkey on the slatted portion of large roasting pan (the type with the lift-out slatted turkey tray).  Skin and quarter 2-3 onions and place those in the bottom of the roasting pan (under the turkey).  You can also add some herb sprigs to the onions if you have any leftover. 

Place turkey uncovered in a preheated 425 degree oven and roast for 30 minutes.  Turn temperature down to 350.  Pour 4-6 cups of chicken stock over onions (in the bottom of the pan) – you want about 1.5-2 inches of liquid.  Working around the turkey, use a spatula to scrape any dripping off the bottom of the pan so they mix with the chicken stock.

Continue to roast your turkey in the 350 degree oven – it should take about 20 minutes per pound for an unstuffed turkey (and a bit more if you stuff).  Once the turkey starts to brown, loosely tent it with foil.  When you have about 2 hours of roasting time left (multiply the number of pounds x 20 minutes and count backwards to know when this will be), start basting your turkey every 15 minutes with the juices in the roasting pan.  Add more chicken stock whenever/if ever you need it.  Loosely re-cover your turkey after each basting.

Starting about 45 minutes before your turkey should be done (using the time guide above), starting testing its internal temperature using a meat thermometer every time you baste.  When you get within 10-15 degrees of your ideal temperature, uncover your turkey and let it brown a bit more.  Continue to baste.  When you get within 5-10 degrees of your desired temperature, your turkey is ready to come out!  Remove your turkey from the oven (gte help if it is heavy!) and baste one more time.  Re-cover your turkey with foil and let sit for at least 20 minutes.  This will center the bird’s juices and raise the internal temperature another 5-10 degrees, leaving you with a perfectly cooked bird.

If you want gravy instructions (now that you have those gorgeous juices), let me know!

Post # 9
Member
1820 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

My neighbor – who I trust implicitly in these things – suggests adding red miso paste to the butter paste before putting it under the skin.  Apparently, this is great for keeping the breast meat moist and tender.  (Note – if you do this, you should make sure to use unsalted butter and low sodium chicken stock, as miso is pretty salty.)

Post # 10
Member
1820 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

My neighbor – who I trust implicitly in these things – suggests adding red miso paste to the butter paste before putting it under the skin.  Apparently, this is great for keeping the breast meat moist and tender.  (Note – if you do this, you should make sure to use unsalted butter and low sodium chicken stock, as miso is pretty salty.)

Post # 11
Member
52 posts
Worker bee

I’m buying either a tiny turkey or a turkey breast because I’m cooking only for my Boyfriend or Best Friend and I. I’m making:

Roasted Turkey with Bourbon-Butter Glaze

1/2 cup butter, softened 

1/4 cup packed brown sugar 

2 tablespoons snipped fresh marjoram or 2 teaspoons dried marjoram, crushed 

1 teaspoon finely shredded lemon peel 

1 (14 to 16-pound) turkey 
1/4 cup bourbon 
Salt 
Pepper 
Fresh herbs (optional) 
Kumquats (optional)

  1. For glaze, combine butter, brown sugar, marjoram, and lemon peel in a small mixing bowl.
  2. Place turkey, breast side up, on a rack in a shallow roasting pan. Using your fingers, separate turkey skin from breast meat, being careful not to tear skin or pierce meat. Spread about half of the glaze over the breast meat under the skin.
  3. Melt remaining glaze; cool slightly. Stir in bourbon. Brush mixture over outside of turkey. Season turkey with salt and pepper. Pull neck skin to back and fasten with a short skewer. Tuck drumsticks under the band of skin that crosses the tail. If there isn’t a band, tie drumsticks to tail. Twist wing tips under back.
  4. Insert a meat thermometer in the center of an inside thigh muscle. The thermometer bulb should not touch bone. Cover turkey loosely with foil. Roast in a 325°F (160°C) oven for 3 3/4 to 4 1/4 hours or until thermometer registers 180°F (85°C). After 3 hours, cut the skin or string between drumsticks. Remove foil the last 30 minutes of roasting to let bird brown. Turkey is done when drumsticks move very easily in their sockets and their thickest parts feel soft when pressed. Remove turkey from oven and cover loosely with foil. Let stand 15 to 20 minutes before carving. If desired, garnish platter with fresh herbs and kumquats.

Makes 12 to 15 servings.

Post # 12
Member
247 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

Definately use a cooking bag. I’m telling you putting it in a bag, in the roaster and all the juices it stays moist and YUMMY! 🙂

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