(Closed) The difference between being pregnant in the US and being pregnant in Canada

posted 7 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 32
Member
1123 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

Not to get political but Canada is sounding better and better to me every day.

I used to love this country. Used to. I love what it stands for but what it says it stands for and what it actually does is a HUGE difference.

The medical field here is horrible. Give me fewer doctors appointments but with medical and I’ll be perfectly happy. It takes minimum of working 6 months full time at many jobs just to get medical. Then you get medical and they wont cover anything you had previously before the actual insurance starts.

Maternity leave here is a JOKE.

Insurance prices costs as much as it would if you were seeing a doctor more than once a month and when you don’t need it, you’re just throwing money down the drain. The only real reason for needing medical is for emergency reasons. Otherwise with co pays your monthly payment and deductibles, you’re paying more average with insurance than without.

I’ve been telling my fiance I want to move to Canada for the last two years and I’m serious about it. I don’t like what things have become in the states. It’s a shame too because I remember once upon a time I was a BIG patriot

Post # 33
Member
1675 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

@mrshollinger:  If you’ve worked 600 hours in the last year you are eligible to collect EI (up to 55% of your income, to a maximum of $501/week) for 52 weeks. Some employers then “top up” the EI to a certain percentage of the employee’s wage (e.g. my employer tops up my salary to 95% for the first four months of my leave), but everyone who meets the eligibilty requirements for EI can collect it.

 

Main differences I see, based solely on my experiences and the experiences of others I know:

-The care is more hands-off – I imagine this is because, as a whole, we are less litigious in Canada.

-U/S are only typically standard to 12 weeks and 19/20 weeks. Elective u/s are available at private clinics at your own cost.

-In Ontario, you have the choice of being referred to either an OB or a midwife. Both are considered primary-care providers. Midwives are highly trained and regulated. You get either a midwife or an OB, not both. Midwives have hospital privileges.

-Mat. leave benefits obviously differ vastly between the two countries.

Post # 34
Member
1621 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@mrshollinger and @hergreenapples:  Being self-employed, I can say that while I’m entitled to a maternity leave of the same length of weeks but not the pay because I also don’t pay into EI.  But I’ve *never* heard of an employee, regardless of the employer, not getting the 55% EI that you describe. 

 

Post # 35
Member
3586 posts
Sugar bee

@CanAmBride:  In the US, you see an ER Dr in less than 30 minutes.

 

I’ve been to the ER a few times in my lifetime and the only time that happened was when I was in labor, but that was probably because I was making a puddle of water on the floor from where my water had broke.LOL

Post # 36
Member
413 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@mrshollinger:  I’d double check this. You’re certainly entitled the EI benefits at a bare minimum if you’ve been paying into them. Anything the employer does on top of that is different.

Post # 37
Member
1102 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: City, State

I didn’t realize that EI paid out 55%, I meant I would be unpaid from my employer but collecting EI.

Post # 38
Member
336 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 2014

@mrshollinger:  oh ok.. Thanks for clarifying.. I read that it was mandatory that employers offer 50 weeks off with 55% pay. my bad :/

Post # 39
Member
1675 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

@MsHeatFan:  

@mrshollinger:  

Just for the sake of clarity, although I imagine you are already aware of this, it’s 55% of your pay if you make $47,400/year or less. If you make more than that, you top out at the max EI, which is currently $501/week (less tax). It’s not 55% of your salary if you make more than $47k! Would be nice though 🙂

Post # 40
Member
336 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 2014

@hergreenapples:  Ahhhhh.. Gotcha! 
Thank you for clarifying :] 

Post # 42
Member
373 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

I’m sorry but I live in Canada, and I have amazing doctors yes I have 3 doctors and I dont have to pay for any of them. I have my family doctor I have my OB/GYN and I also have another OB closer to where I live who I see for my monthly appointments. I’ve had 3 ultrasounds so far and will have another one in 2 weeks, havent had to pay for any of them. I’ve had a ton of tests done, and still have more; so to say that americans get more testing is crazy. I can get into my doctors office within a day if I want or even the same day if its an emergency. I went into the ER when I was 7 weeks due to spotting and was seen within 15 minutes, had all my blood work and exams done and then was sceduled for a emergency ultrasound the next day and the ER doctor even called me to let me know what my HCG results were as soon as they came in so I didnt have to wait for the bloodwork to get back.I also live in Vancouver so its a very populated area. If that isnt an amazing health care system I dont know what is!

Post # 43
Member
250 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

Yes, in Canada, maternity leave is 3 months (I think 15 weeks specifically), and then the rest, up to 52 weeks, is parental leave. 

The EI is paid into by employees, but it is a government plan, not a company plan.  So the 55% that you get while you are on leave is actually money that you pay into while you are working. 

The company that you work for can chose to top up your EI in their policy, I think mine is full top-up up to 6 weeks.

As someone mentioned above, the 55% is capped, to about $475 (after taxes) per week, depending on your salary.

So even though parents can take up to 1 year of leave, they can chose to go back to work after 3 months if they want.

Post # 44
Member
466 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

My best friend and I have the same due date, she’s in Michigan, I’m in Ontario, we’re both using midwives (although she’s using a birthing centre attached to a hospital which we don’t have here). She’s told me time and again how much she wishes she had Ontario health care during her pregnancy.

Overall, I’d say I have more appointments and more testing done. More blood tests, and I think 1 more ultrasound than she’s had. I also get 6 weeks of post-partum home visits from our midwives, she doesn’t get anything of the sort. My appointments with my midwives are about 30-40 minutes where hers are more in the 10-20 minute range I believe. She also describes it as being more clinical/hospital setting, whereas my midwives have a clinic but it’s very residential and relaxed feeling.

I’ve been REALLY happy with my level of health care throughout my pregnancy. My iron levels have been a bit low, so my midwives asked me to follow up with my family physician who CC’ed my midwives on all my further tests, no problem. I was talking to my friend about it and she hasn’t had her iron tested or really many other tests done. It’s a little surprising!

I wouldn’t trade my OHIP coverage for anything. I’ve never had a problem seeing a doctor or specialist. I hurt my back years ago and got in for a CT scan that same day at the hospital, and I had a catscan at the hospital within 2 weeks of my doctor ordering it a couple years ago (non-emergency issue).  No complaints here! I think it’s tax dollars well spent!

Post # 45
Member
1577 posts
Bumble bee

I’m in the US and have pretty good health insurance through my husband’s work, and also a secondary through my mother (which thanks to the recent healthcare reform I can stay on till I’m 26 regardless of dependant status). I see an OB, cardiologist, dermatologist, and chiropractor and never pay for anything out of pocket for the appointments (though obviously my husband and mother pay for the insurance out of their checks every payday). I’ve never had a problem getting appointments. Here, it depends on what ER you go to, some have long waits and others dont. But, I work at an urgent care clinic and we get people back in less than 10 minutes to see a doc and they are usually done and leaving in under 1hr.  Prenatal care is all covered for women, so that’s not an issue, but the real problem I think here is the lack of maternity leave/pay. :/

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