(Closed) THE GREAT DEBATE PRIVATE VS PUBLIC

posted 9 years ago in Parenting
  • poll: Private vs Public

    Private

    Public

  • Post # 92
    Member
    3175 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: May 2012

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    @onyx81:  Interesting. I was just curious, as I was homeschooled for one year, and still subject to standardized tests. I do appreciate that they are not as “central” as they are in public schools, as I feel that “teaching to the test” is not beneficial to teachers or students.

    ETA: Lack of emphasis on standardized testing would definitely be a point in favor of private schools for me 🙂 DH is in favor of private schooling, so we’re still debating, & I like any info I can get!

    Post # 93
    Member
    1609 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: June 2012

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    @les105:  The private school I used to work at did highly emphasize the standardized test, so I think it really depends on the school.  I also went to a private school 1st-5th grade, and I remember the standardized test being a big deal as well.  The new Common Core Standards is very different from the regular standarized tests, and I am very hopefuly that this will cause a shift in our society and help it slowly move away from that.

    Post # 94
    Member
    367 posts
    Helper bee

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    @les105:  & onyx81Actually, private schools in the US are not legally required to do any standardized testing, though some may choose to. (Public schools actually only have to do standardized testing so they don’t lose federal funding.) A good friend of mine went to excellent college preparatory private schools her whole life, and the first time she ever took a standardized test was the SAT.

    Also, private schools do not have to use the state curriculum (which is what the CCS are). They can and do write their own curricula. I doubt any will choose to use the CCS if they feel their current curriculum process is working for their communities.

    Post # 95
    Member
    367 posts
    Helper bee

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    @les105:  Also, in some places in the US, teachers’ pay/tenure/job security is, unfortunately, tied to test scores. Hopefully not anywhere I will ever work or send my kids to learn, though.

    Post # 96
    Member
    3175 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: May 2012

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    @onyx81:  Thanks for the info! I wonder why I was required to take standardized tests as a homeschooler while private schools are not held to this standard? I did take several classes on education in college, and it’s just so odd & confusing (and ever changing!).

    @vegempanada: Yep, this is a major part of the reason I dropped the “education” part of my studies & focused on languages. I hope to be a professor some day, but I’m just not sure teaching in the public school system appeals to me due to the bureaucracy.

    Post # 97
    Member
    1609 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: June 2012

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    @vegempanada:  You are right, I know they aren’t required to take a standardized test, but almost all, at least in my area do.  

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    @les105:  , The reason you have to take the state test as a homeschooled student is because those are generally go through the public school.  A homeschooled student has to be tested, and those scores, at least in my state, would go to the school that child is supposed to go to, and counted in their scores… even if they were never taught a day in the school  It is a pretty messed up system.

    Post # 98
    Member
    7768 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: July 2010

    I went to the worst worst worst sorry excuse for a public school in rural wisconsin.  I really got screwed on the academics.  My younger half sister went to a private school that I only dream I could have attended!  If I could afford it, I would 100% send my kids to private school!!!!!!

    Post # 99
    Member
    1773 posts
    Buzzing bee

    I would never consider sending any child to public school. Charter/waldorf/private for me!! I did waldorf private, waldorf charter and then public high school.

     

    I had a great time in waldorf. I learned a lot culturally. I learned about different religions around the  world, cultures, art and all sorts of musical stuff. I always did all of my work since it was so close-knit. I didn’t even think of another option. Everyone always had the attention they needed. It was great. I went to public high school for the ‘experience.’ Oh god. I learned very little. I had a few pretty good teachers, and it was a pretty good school. 

     

    I had a breakdown my first week there because I was so confused how they expected us to read a whole chapter, learn everything from it, and answer questions. I had always had to LEARN things prior to that. I remember how ashamed I felt when I just looked for the answers and hardly read the chapter. Then I realized that’s how you’re SUPPOSED to do it. I was so confused. Now I’m just disgusted.

     

    What public school taught me: 

    1. There are a lot of really really crummy people.

    2. I don’t consider myself smart, but are they really that ignorant???

    3. You shouldn’t try too hard to challenge yourself, because you wouldn’t want to get a C in too many AP classes, better to get As from the teachers who will give them to you.

    4. Just get through the tests and make sure to at least copy your homework.

     

    It wasn’t any kind of positive experience. I wouldn’t ever consider sending a child to public school. And for the record, I did know some very smart, great people there. I had some awesome teachers. Unfortunately, my acting class was spent watching Tom Hanks movies. That kind of sums up the experience.

    Post # 100
    Member
    1052 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: June 2014 - Cedar Lake Cellars

    I went to private schools my whole life and learned that, for sure, the teaching is not in any way superior.  In fact, in my state, the teachers didn’t even have to have a teaching degree.  This meant that many of them were very bad at it and didn’t care. 

    It was also a very sheltered social experience in which I didn’t fit in.  I found it extraordinarily hard to find friends in a world of spoiled, entitled, cookie-cutter kids.  I spent years recovering from the social damage caused by being a misfit in a world of Barbies and Kens. 

    On the bright side, it did challange me academically.  Standards were high and I had to work very hard, especially since not all the teachers did.  I feel that this influence can come from the parents too though, high standards can come from home. 

    Given this experience, I would choose public, hands down.

    Post # 101
    Member
    2701 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: November 2011

    I went to both and much preferred public. If we were to have kids now they would go to public. The school district, which is the same one I grew up in doesn’t have the best reputation. But I strongly believe it is the child NOT the teachers that determine the outcome of these kids. I want to save my money for their college tuition than an elementary education.

    Not to toot my own horn here but I am more successful than most of my private school classmates. I only attended a privvate school from grades 1-4 and they attended a private school their whole life. So I strongly believe that chosing a private school over public will NOT make your child more successful in life.

    Post # 102
    Member
    2701 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: November 2011

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    @Baimee:  I think the Waldorf schools are great. But unfortunately, it doesn’t carry a great price tag!

    Post # 103
    Member
    33 posts
    Newbee
    • Wedding: October 2010

    I voted private, when actuallity it depends. It depends on the schools available and on my child. I had very mixed experiences in school so I have given this a lot of thought.

    I am the far youngest of 3 children. Both of my older siblings went to a superior private school until 7th and 9th grade respectfully, then in the following grades were switched to very well respected public schools. I had attented a small private school k-most of 1st grade. At the private school we were starting to learn cursive and spanish, and the school was very structured. I loved school and remember crying that I would have to leave my friends and teachers when we moved. After this move until high school graduation I will tell you I HATED school. Due to our family moving I was switched to a public school at the end of February. All of the other students knew each other and where they were supposed to be. The public school was much less structed and I got very lost at the time and fell behind despite the work being less difficult. At the private school I had worn a uniform. When I switched to public school I was tormented by the other children for being poor because I only owned uniforms, church and then “play” cloths which were all hand me downs. Now I had to wear the 2nd hand things everyday. This had not been a problem at private school because I was always dressed “appropriately”.

    My family moved 2 more times in the next two years and I fell far behind, without anyone noticing. In addition I am slightly dislexic but could squeek by so no one cared that I didn’t excell. Let me tell you that these are ranked among the VERY best public schools. School did not improve much for me. I was a cronic skipper in high school. I struggled with poor self esteme. My parents loved me and did their best but were absent for their own reasons. I did have some wonderful teachers and friends in public school but I feel I could have used the additional support that some private schools come with.

    Both of my older siblings beleive the private school gave them a strong base. If they fell behind or did not do their work the school held them accountable.

    As for diversity, we were lucky enough that both the private schools my siblings attended and our public schools were fairly diverse.

    I truly believe there are great public and private schools, teachers, and students. It is a matter of helping the child enough at home and finding the best available situation for them.

    Post # 104
    Member
    1212 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: September 2014

    As someone who attended both, I will hands down choose to place my children in public school, as long as the school district we’re living in has a decent reputation.

    I had a really awful experience with private school. The education was good, but as someone who loved learning, I was able to seek out a good education in a public school setting as well. My issues were with the social environment. It was a small, Christian school. My class was about 30 people. There was a lot of bullying and cliqueishness, it didn’t provide me the oppurtunity to mingle with diverse people, and it couldn’t offer me the quintessential school experience (no art classes, no clubs, etc). 

    Post # 105
    Member
    1773 posts
    Buzzing bee

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    @MlleBrielle:  True dat! We got on a reduced-fee program. I can’t even tell you how much I loved that school.

     

     

    Also, I’d like to comment on diversity. In my area, overall, we don’t have a lot of diversity. There are a lot of white people, and then a large latino community. There’s a laguage barrier in many cases. Anyhow, in my Waldorf school we had 3 black kids. We had maybe an Asian here or there and I think we had two kids in my class of Mexican descent.  We had a lot of white people. I felt much more exposed to other cultures though, just due to the learning style. We learned about so so so many cultures through their mythology, religion, as well as music or what have you. I felt so much more exposed there, because it taught us to be very accepting.

    Public school was similarly distributed, but with many many more hispanic folk. More diverse? Sure. Much more judgement overall and more bickering? Mmhmm. We all had ‘trees’ that we occupied. I was with the AP class kids, there was a hick tree, a jock tree, an emo tree, a goth tree, and so on. Forget the ethnicities, it wasn’t about that. It was a PITA to deal with all those people.

    Post # 106
    Member
    367 posts
    Helper bee

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    @MlleBrielle:  “So I strongly believe that chosing a private school over public will NOT make your child more successful in life.”

    True that. Private schools are great for kids who might “slip through the cracks” in a public school, because the teachers can give them more individual attention, but the important thing is to find the right school for your family’s needs.

    Also, NAEP scores (national achievement test scores) are actually higher for public school students than private school students (at least they were last time I checked…). I’m not saying that achievement tests are a perfect measure of achievement or school effectiveness, but that fact definitely made me reconsider the notion that private school students receive a superior education across the board. Every public and private school is unique; some are better than others.

     

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