(Closed) The Great Debate: Public vs Private School Part 2

posted 8 years ago in The Lounge
Post # 32
Member
15399 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

Public.  We specifically bought a house in one of the best public school systems in the state.  We’re paying almost 9k a year in taxes toward *something* and sure aren’t going to fork over anymore for private school!

Post # 33
Member
1596 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

I honestly think it depends on the area (city, state, etc) and the child.

Schools are SO different every where you go, and each child thrives in a different environment so it’s really situational IMO.

Personally, I went to a private Catholic school from pre-school through 2nd grade. It was a teeny school (only about 20 kids in each grade), so I didn’t get much exposure to different kids/races/lifestyles, etc. Looking back, I think this made me really shy and nervous and closed-minded until, like, high school.

The Catholic school also had a budget that barely existed so we had NO extracurriculars. No band. No cheer leaders. No sports teams. No science club. No art club. No drama club. Nothing. In 2nd grade, that isn’t such a big deal, but I think it is once students hit 6th – 12th grade. I think extracurriculars are REALLY important.

Luckily for me, I attended public school 3rd -12th grade. At first it was a rough transition. I had triple the number of kids in my class and they were all SO different – different races, backgrounds, personalites, etc. Kids were mean. Kids were weird. Kids thought I was weird. 

But around 8th grade or so it got better. And I’m glad I was exposed to so many different kinds of people.

PLUS I had an amazing opportunity to be part of a huge, competitive marching band. We traveled all over the place, got to compete, win awards, and even played for President Bush once and at a pro football game once. I met SO many incredible people and learned SO much about music and life in general. And I met my first love there 🙂

I would have never gotten to do those things in my private Catholic school, and in my opinion going to public school let me find myself and become a more well-rounded, happy person with passion for different things in life.

But then again, I know that there ARE private schools out there that are big and offer various activities and opportunties, so it really just depends.

Post # 34
Member
2148 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

@rbuchanan09:  I agree with the PP who say it depends on exactly where you’re talking about….I live on Long Island, and there isn’t a house here with property taxes less than 8k per year, with most being 10k+…Our school districts, for the most part, are light years away from private/Catholic Schools. I’m a NYC teacher, and the city is a whole different animal, but I wouldn’t put my kids in private school on LI if you paid me. My understanding is that they aren’t required to be a NY state certified teacher-any Joe Schmo can walk in with a Bachelor’s degree and teach. I also know for a fact that a Chemistry teacher I had in HS who made sexually inappropriate comments to myself as well as 5 other girls, is now teaching in an 8k per year Catholic school. If the parents only knew… The general consensus among my friends and I, is that many things are the same where ever you go, and the kids in  super expensive private schools just have more expensive drugs…Kids I went to HS with smoked weed, the private school kids had coke.

Post # 35
Member
9916 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

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@tksjewelry:  Can you explain what you have against the Common Core standards?  From what I’ve seen, they are much more focused on critical thinking and developing interdisciplinary analysis than the previous standards.

Post # 36
Member
2148 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

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@peachacid:  I am also a teacher…I can’t speak for other states, but in grading the NYS ELA exams this year, students who  answered a question incorrectly, but provided a reasonable explanation, were given credit for the incorrect answer. Students who provided a correct answer but not adequate information as to why they answered the way they did, were not given credit. To me, that’s crazy. Our city also was sending 5th grade elementary teachers to grade the 8th grade exams, and they couldn’t even answer the problems, let alone grade exams. I am all for increasing rigor, but the vocabulary I saw on the 7th and 8th grade ELA exams would have given me trouble at that age, as an honor student…Nevermind my inner city students who typically are reading 2 grade levels below their grade. I whole heartedly believe in creating interdisciplinary exams because so many concepts overlap, but the way that I’ve been seeing schools/cities scramble to implement these ideas is ridiculous. I also was under the impression that private schools didn’t get out of it..I thought it was all schools. Sorry if I stepped on TKSjewelry’s toes, but wanted to add my 2 cents 🙂

Post # 37
Member
17 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: July 2013

We bought a house specifically with local schools in mind, so I’m all for public. Why pay for something, when you can get the same thing for free? We’re lucky to have bought a house in a good school intake area. There are a couple of public high schools which are as good as private schools and highly sought after, one of which is around the corner from our house. They have an incredible music program as well so that’s great. If there was a specific reason to send a child to private school, like special needs or if they were being bullied at the local school, then I definitely would. But besides that, I’d much rather send them to the local school. Not only is it free, which means we’ll have way more money for other things like nice holidays, because it’s local intake only, all of the friends they will make will be from the neighbourhood, which is kind of nice.

Post # 38
Member
9916 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

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@WhatMaeBee:  I was under the impression that the Common Core was a new set of standards to use while teaching, not for assessments.  It may be different in other states, but in Pennsylvania they’re things like, “Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.”  

We had curriculum teams working to change our curricula for math and English this summer to align them with the Common Core, and while the texts we read in each grade are slightly more difficult, the students have met the challenges well.  For example, we read book 1 of the Iliad with my seventh graders, half of whom are special education students.  They didn’t need it dumbed down, they just needed it explained thoroughly.  So while it may be more difficult in general, I don’t see that as a problem if the students have good teachers.

 

The 5th grade teachers not being able to answer 8th grade questions seems more a problem of teacher intelligence than anything else.  

Post # 39
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14490 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

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@peachacid:  There is no critical thinking involved in common core. It doesn’t allow for any innovation. Its not even full rolled out, yet its implemented, teacher are teaching for specific tests that aren’t even developed yet. It keeps standards stagnant. No allowances for individual needs of student. No innovation or incentives allowed for teachers. Where its been implemented scores have dropped significantly, average of 30%. Even teachers unions are against it. Its huge financial burden already overly burdened school budgets. They say international standards, but refuse to show any proof of those “standards”. One private company provides all the materials. Data collections on our kids. Parents are not allowed to see tests in advance or ever. I could go on and on. I’ve been to three public meetings on common core in my area and one in Iowa. Teachers were vehemently against it, which surprised me. I’m no expert on CC, but almost every major news publication has come out against CC. There are tons of YouTube videos out there that talk about the issues more also. 

This is a common core math problem, this is ridiculous: ( sorry, my tablet always puts the pics on the top. I have no idea why)

 

Post # 40
Member
164 posts
Blushing bee

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@peachacid:  “However, Catholic schools aren’t going to produce critical thinkers…so if you remove religious schools from the mix, I totally agree.”

Really? This statement is actually pretty offensive. I went to Catholic school and my critical thinking skills are just fine.  I noticed a definite difference between my K-8 Catholic school and the public high school I attended. It was a change for the worse. I was much more challenged and put through more rigorous academic expectations in the Catholic school. My freshman year of high school at the public school was mostly review of what I’d learned in the Catholic school. My writing skills were more developed than those of my classmates, I’d already had more experience applying the scientific method, and I was able to not only think critically but also defend my position with facts and research.
 
Just not really sure what you meant with this statement, but I don’t think it’s a fair statement at all.  I teach in a public school, so I’m not a public school basher at all. There are great public schools out there.  There are also great private/parochial schools out there. Individual schools and districts vary widely.  I just hate seeing Catholic schools being put down when I feel like, at least in my personal experience, my Catholic school education was far superior to my public school education.
 
 

Post # 41
Member
14490 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

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@WhatMaeBee:  it depends on the states right now whether or not privates are forced into CC. Right now our state hasn’t adopted it, and it isn’t likely too. If it affects private schools it will kill them, I didn’t know it would affect them. If we put all kids learning the exact same things, in the exact same ways, only to reach a certain standard, that’s something straight out of a bad futuristic movie. No. This is scary. 

Post # 42
Member
519 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

I teach in both the private and public school settings. I have had this debate myself would I want to send my kids to private or public? ( I have no kids yet).

Pros for Public

-Set budgets

-Speaclised services such as specail education, OT, ect.

 

Pros for Private

– Most of my private schools students are at a higher level grade waise compaired to private.

– The kids are alot more respectful in compairson to my public kids.

-Private schools will hold a kid back a grade level if nessary/benefital to the kid…whereas must public school systems just move them along to next grade level when they are not up to performing standards for it.

 

 

Post # 43
Member
9916 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

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@tksjewelry:  My school is taking the standards and making a curriculum that is definitely focused on critical thinking.  Unfortunately, we’re closing in January…so who cares anyway.  The way it was presented to us was that they were a new set of standards that we needed to align our curricula to…not a bunch of new programs to follow.  Since I’ll be at a new school soon, hopefully, I wonder how the Common Core will have been adopted there.  I think the issue, though, is standards in general — how do you ensure rigorous, high-quality education without some sort of set of standards?  Yet…how do you make sure education is local and individualized WITH standards?  Standards are ALWAYS a problem.

 

 

 

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@MsLesPaul:  Well, since Catholic education is religious…they can’t exactly be taught to critically analyze the Catholic church, can they?  That’s all I meant.  Unless Catholic schools aren’t teaching anything Catholic at all…which would surprise me.

 

Post # 44
Member
295 posts
Helper bee

I hope to send my children to a private school. My reasoning is I want them to have extermely small classes sizes and  a different approach to learning. So ideally I know i would look for schools that are either: a montessori or an ark school. Although I would never ruled out a public school but I know that I would prefer to send my child to one of those style of schools because to me those style of education are much more superior then the tradition sense.

Post # 45
Member
2148 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

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@peachacid:  so sad that your school is closing- I hope you can find a new position easily :-/ we have been told that our 9th graders are taking a common core algebra test as well as the algebra regents this June. My school ordered all the materials that are supposed to be test prep things back in July, and my principal just told us everything is back ordered til February… And now they’re going to measure my success as a teacher (40% of my rating) based on a test that we have no idea what’s on it… Totally whacko! Maybe other states have been figuring it out more successfully but literally every single teacher I know is full force against CC to the point of writing petitions and endless letters to the governor and state Ed dept.  It’s recognized as a form of evil around here 😉

Post # 46
Member
903 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

I did public growing up, but im hesitant to let my future child do the same. Im fine with public schools until grade 5ish, when the peer pressure, smoking, drinking, and partying starts. I know i nearly fell into the trap in high school, and fi was drinking and smoking in grade school. Luckily it didnt have lifelong consequences for either of us (aside from the loser friends fi accumulated… But thats a whole other post!) but i would hate for my child to have to go through the same thing.

I dont think the kids that attend private school are as inclined to experiment with alcohol, drugs or other bad Behaviours in comparison to kids in the public school setting… But i could be wrong. I guess well see when the time comes!

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