(Closed) The Texas Textbook Controversy

posted 8 years ago in The Lounge
  • poll: Do You Support These Revisions?
    Yes : (13 votes)
    10 %
    No : (122 votes)
    90 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    4001 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: June 2010

    Agreed.  I really don’t have anything articulate to say about it.  I tend to disagree with most conservative thinking.  I’m not a fan of racists either. 

    Post # 4
    Member
    2289 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: November 2010

    I’m going to have to echo what jennifer_espos said. It’s just….sick.

    Post # 5
    Member
    4024 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: September 2010

    I second both! 🙂

    Post # 6
    Member
    967 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: August 2010

    I think it’s BS. There should always be a separation of church and state, and rewriting key elements of history to adapt to what some people think is a more “correct” scenario is awful. Students should be spared political agenda in their educations – they’ll experience enough of it from the media. I’m a journalist and a teacher and it’s frightening how many things are “cleaned up” in text books already…

    *step off soap box*

    Post # 7
    Member
    11325 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: February 2011

    I think its disgusting. They should be ashamed of themselves. I could say more (lots more), but it would turn into a very long rant about the “moral majority”, republicans, and much of texas.. that would probably get us way off track 🙂

    Post # 8
    Member
    3564 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: August 2010

    To me, this is just another sad example of bipartisanism/our 2 party system. We need more than 2 parties, so our political system can stop being seen as “either Republican or Democrat”–neither one is perfect! We need to stop pitting them against each other and stop looking at issues in terms of party lines, and start looking at whether a particular bill/vote/etc actually helps the issues at hand. People get so caught up in voting for or against a certain party that they lose sight of what the real issues/solutions are.

     

    Post # 9
    Member
    333 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: May 2010

    Well said, SweetheartDealer.

    Post # 10
    Member
    2008 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: September 2009

    Ugh.  I stand no chance of articulating rational points so I’m going to keep my mouth shut except to say that I now have the creeps.  Ugh.  Where’d that sunshine and roses/puppies and kittens thread go?  I feel sick. 

    Post # 11
    Member
    14186 posts
    Honey Beekeeper
    • Wedding: June 2009

    I don’t get why they are doing this. Why can’t you teach evolution AND the creationism theories in the same class? I know we learned both back in California. BUT, in Missouri, my teacher glazed over them because she said she didn’t want to have to deal with it. Not to mention–just because it appears in a book does not mean the teacher actually goes over this.

    I AM on board with what the article said about sociology–teaching people to be responsible for their OWN decisions, not blaming society. But that is a personal philosophy.

    I don’t like the idea of important people being omitted, though. Next up you’ll have atheists and/or liberals argue that topics regarding the historical significance of, say, Jesus, needs to be removed. I don’t know about you guys, but I learned who Buddha was, who Jesus was, etc, and got tidbits on all the other important religious figures as far as history goes. Not theology. In 7th grade.

    How do textbooks get chosen for schools? Does a board pick them? Does a teacher?

    This sounds dangerous to me. I feel like teachers, in general, tend to be more liberal because they are exposed to a very WIDE variety of students, from different cultural backgrounds and lifestyles. I feel like you have to be open minded to be a teacher! 

    Post # 12
    Member
    41 posts
    Newbee
    • Wedding: May 2010

    I teach. I teach inner-city. And I teach history. These books wash out all of the things that might be interesting to my children. If you really feel this way, you need to be politically active about it. The problem is that the only loud people are those people who agree with it, the rest of us have been trained to look away and walk fast quietly when we see something so very beyond description. Who would think that you could just put whatever in a history book.? Truthfully, it reminds me of a practice in Jim Crow south where text books were written to teach African-Americans that the south and the repressive political system was actually good for them. It isn’t a big step from these revisions to those. And, if you are thinking that we actually have separation of church and state you aren’t paying attention to the healthcare/aborition debate or the small prayer challeges going on in the deep south. The conservative right is knicking away at this separation everyday. If you are really that worried about it, get political. It is the only way to stop it.

     

    Post # 13
    Member
    510 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: September 2009

    WOW…I saw a portion of this on the John Stewart Show last night…now I know why during Black History month, kids only learn about the same two characters every year…

    Post # 15
    Member
    41 posts
    Newbee
    • Wedding: May 2010

    @ ejs4y6

    Teachers can be on textbook committees, but the problem with Texas is that they drive the market because they buy so many books. My books in Tennessee are a barely revised edition for Texas.

     

    I am actually responsible for teaching about a diverse array of religions. It isn’t hard at all. You just create a climate of respect and understanding and you stress that even if it isn’t “your individual belief” as a teacher or student,  educated people know about other people. I teach in the Bible-belt, and my students are tested on Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. I teach them all with no complaints. I also teach about the historical relationship of Judaism, Islam and Christianity, but we don’t preach. They have to know that Muhammad is the prophet of Islam, Jesus is the messiah to Christians, and Jews think that the messiah is still to come. Buddha is the originator of Buddhism, etc. It just isn’t that hard. As for creationism and evolution, evolution is a theory and even presented alone as a theory it doesn’t really challenge creationism. You just have to be able to pass a test. I have noticed that there is increasing pressure to even not teach it at the collegiate level.

     

    Post # 16
    Member
    3125 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: December 2009

    i think that sometimes we forget that without all of the freedoms that our country provides us that the religious folks might not be able to practice they way they do. So putting all of this clearly religious / politically charged information in PUBLIC school textbooks is just the worst idea. Separation of church and state is best for EVERYONE – I just wish everyone thought so!  Our children need to learn more in school and shouldn’t be clouded with all this. We need to improve our education standards to get more competitive on the world stage. We’re not going to do that with busted textbooks, that’s for sure. And all of these standardized tests! ahhhh. I could ramble for hours.

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