(Closed) The word is spelled "ridiculous" not "rediculous".

posted 8 years ago in The Lounge
Post # 62
Member
3305 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

What irks me is the phrasing “Me and my fiance”. It’s not me, it’s I, as in “My fiance and I”.

Yes, I’m weird. 

Post # 64
Member
577 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

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@doberman:  It can also be “my fiance and me” depending on the sentence context. For instance, “My Future Mother-In-Law bought a new house for my fiance and me.” Because “My Future Mother-In-Law bought a new house for I” doesn’t make sense.

My big thing is people who put quotation marks around random words. I have a friend on Facebook who does this all of the time and it makes me crazy. They’ll post stuff like, “Going out for some “pizza” later!” I’m like, “What are you REALLY going out for?” I think it’s supposed to be for emphasis but it drives me nuts.

(Also I know that the nested quotation should technically be the single ones. But I was just trying to make it clear what I was talking about.)

Post # 65
Member
413 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

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@ellebeerob:  are you sure she isn’t “pregnet” ? Lol

Post # 66
Member
3305 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

It can also be “my fiance and me” depending on the sentence context. For instance, “My Future Mother-In-Law bought a new house for my fiance and me.” Because “My Future Mother-In-Law bought a new house for I” doesn’t make sense.

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@hyperJulie:  Oh, I’m well aware of that; I was a writing tutor in college. That’s why I capitalized the M in “Me and my fiance”.  Wink

Post # 67
Member
47421 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

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@mrsSonthebeach: 

Depending on your style guide, it is actually appropriate to use an apostraphe…

(I prefer them without the apostraphe.)

Apostraphe is spelled incorrectly. It is apostrophe, from Middle French apostrophe, from Late Latin apostrophus, from Greek apostrophos .
,
That’s why these posts are so hilarious.People who live in glass houses…

Post # 68
Member
1398 posts
Bumble bee

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@doberman:  That bothers me too!!

I also hate when people say they “let” their SO/DH/FI do something.  Isn’t your SO/DH/FI an adult?  You didn’t “let” him do anything.

Post # 69
Member
7899 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: March 2012 - Pelican Grand Beach Resort

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@julies1949:  indeed

Post # 70
Member
28 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: January 2014

This thread makes me happy. At least I know I’m not alone. Smile It drives me crazy when people don’t use capitals appropriately. Is is really that difficult to hit the shift button?! Especially for ‘I’.

I can be bad for typos sometimes. It’d be great to have spell check on here, even just to catch the silly typos.  

Post # 71
Member
40 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: May 2013

My biggest pet peeve is when people write “loose” instead of “lose.” Like “How could I loose my ring?” Really? It just looks so wrong! 

Post # 72
Member
958 posts
Busy bee

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@peachacid:  This is probably overkill but I knew I kept this book for a reason! 

“The pronunciation of ask as aks is an example of metathesis, a systematic process of sound change. Metathesis involves the reversal, or switching places, or two sounds. For example, the Modern English word bird used to be brid. The modern English verb ask can be traced back to the Old English verb ācsian, the form used throughout England through the eighth century. So in the early Old English verb, the sound /k/ occurs before /s/. During the ninth century, the metathetic form āscian (with the sounds reversed) appeared, the sound /s/ moving before /k/. This new form is the ancestor of Modern English ask, and it gradually replaced the earlier form, although this process took several centuries.

The English poet Chaucer, writing in the last quarter of the fourteenth century, used ask and aks interchangeably. And though Standard English, as it developed, codified ask as the “standard”, folks throughout England employed the archaic form well into the twentieth century. Noah Webster, in Dissertations on the English Language, reported that ax was common in New England, and of course those settling in America brought their English with them, and for many ax would have been the familiar form. By 1953, a survey was taken and it was noted that aks/ax was no longer occurring north of the Mason-Dixon line. Once widely spoken in America, aks had become regarded as Southernism. As African Americans migrated from the South, they carried aks with them, and today enough African American people employ it, regardless of where they live, that it also counts as a feature of African American English.”

–Copyright How English Works: A Linguistic Introduction by Anne Curzan and Michael Adams

And yes PeachAcid, I did type all that out. Because I’m a nerd. Enjoy.

Post # 73
Member
497 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 1993

I think spell check has made us dummer lol. I think most of us rely on it way too much, and it has made us pretty lazy. Especially that auto-correct! Anyway, I do notice the misspelled words, but it doesn’t really bug me. It only starts bugging me when there are soooooo many errors that it just doesn’t make sense anymore

Post # 74
Member
3942 posts
Honey bee

irregardless.

drives me crazy!

Post # 75
Member
111 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

http://theoatmeal.com/comics/misspelling

This is the best comic for grammar and spelling. I love the examples this dude uses to help remind you how to spell words correctly Smile

e.g. if you put an A in “definitely,” you’re definitely an A-hole.

Post # 76
Member
2211 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

Amen, sista.  Sometimes it’s hard for me not to correct people on here when their grammar is so out of whack.  I’ll admit, I’m not always great with sentence structure, but incorrect spelling and word usage drives me nuts!

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@julies1949:  +1

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@lovin_iswhatigot:  Yes, I think spell check, as well as auto-correct, has made us dumber.

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