(Closed) Thinking of getting a Toy Cavoodle/Cavapoo, do you own one??

posted 2 weeks ago in Pets
Post # 2
Member
33 posts
Newbee

Keep in mind that “designer” or “hybrid” dogs are mixes. There is no breeding any of these to eachother and them breeding true. That means that from litter to litter there will be huge discrepancies between the temperament of the pups, coat types, look, size and etc. 

Any poodle mix is going to need daily brushing and a 6 week schedule for grooming appointments in general. Otherwise the dog will get matted, which is extremely uncomfortable and unhealthy. 

Selecting a responsible and good breeder is a months-long process. Some things to look for include whether or not the breeder is willing to take a pup back at any point in the future. Health testing, strict standards of cleanliness… there’s a lot to consider. 

I’ve seen designer dogs that you mention that are lovely and some that are neurotic and completely not what the “breed”  is advertised for.

I hope I don’t sound harsh, Doodles are extremely popular in my area. The irresponsible breeders have done everything from produce genetic disasters to lie to people about the care of the dogs (for example, some have been caught saying not to groom them for a year- wth?).  

Post # 3
Member
1484 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: City, State

I will come out full disclosure up front and say that I’m not a fan of the doodle and ‘poo explosion that has occurred in recent years. Even the man who is credited with breeding the first poodle mixed dog as a “designer breed” says that hindsight being what it is, he would never have started this whole thing. 

That being said, if your heart is set on a poodle/cavalier mix (a “cavapoo” is not a breed), the same things will apply as purchasing any puppy.

Find a good breeder. Well, as good of one as you can find for designer dogs. A good purebred breeder shows their lines to ensure that all dogs are conformationally sound before breeding them. A good breeder health tests, breeds only one to two litters at a time, and doesn’t charge too little or too much for their puppies. Beware the puppy milll/backyard breeder types. You should see the parents and premises in person before purchasing a puppy. Cheap is not best. You should be paying $800-1500 for a well-bred dog. If the breeder is asking anything more than $2000 for their pups, they’ve fed into the designer breed craze, know they can jack up the prices, and should be avoided.

Many doodle/’poo breeds are very cute. Cuddly. Friendly. But they can also have health issues, temperament problems, etc if not bred from the right dogs. If a Labrador and a poodle parent each have hip dysplasia, guess what a mix puppy of the two will have? 😢 

My advice is to do all of your research and feel confident in your choice of breeder. From there, you will find a lovely, healthy, happy friendly family pet. 

Post # 4
Member
701 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2018

I agree with what the previous posters are saying. Please proceed with extreme caution – or… you know: ADOPT. I’m sure there are plenty of poodle crosses in shelters.

Also, be aware that toy breeds can have problematic health issues, especially because their bones can be so small and breakable. Cavaliers often suffer from heart conditions and there’s a brain issue many of them have. The way around these issues are finding a GOOD breeder. I highly doubt you’ll find a lot of cavapoo “breeders” that test on all those things.

 

What are the reasons that made you settle on this mix? Are you hoping for a dog that won’t shed – because a Cavapoo might shed. If you get a purebred poodle, it won’t. If you’re hoping for a dog that doesn’t need professional trims, the Cavalier would be the better choice.

Post # 5
Hostess
2251 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2017

I’m slightly concerned that you seem more concerned about cuteness factor than anything else.

ETA: I didn’t say this to be bitchy, I just mean there’s a LOT of things to consider about getting a dog. I’ve never met a poodle I liked, they all seem to have terrible temperament. 

Post # 6
Member
1281 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2019

Ehhhh I’m really on the fence with this one

My parents have a cavoodle and he’s a wonderful, intelligent creature. Good looking too. If all cavoodles were like him, I would get one any day

Then my sister also has one too. But somehow got the worst of both breeds and tbh shes as thick as drywall. She doesn’t look right. Like she’s a testament to mans arrogance to mix two breeds of dogs and charge $1500 for it. She was very hard to train, walks funny and always smells no matter when she was bathed.

I wouldn’t go with a cross breed unless it’s a rescue. It’s like a lottery – you never know what you’ll get

Post # 8
Member
600 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2019

Of the doodles in my family one’s a neurotic mess. He’s a big dog with little dog issues. And the other is a great dog but has a laundry list of health issues and allergies.

Of my friends that have crossed dogs like this you really have no idea what you will get. One will be awesome and the other.. gets the worst of both breeds or a weird mix of those breeds and is a neurotic dog. There doesn’t seem to be consistency in their temperaments. I like the fostering route as you get to see if the dog is a good match for you before making the commitment. 

Post # 9
Member
1546 posts
Bumble bee

‘Doodles’ and ‘poos’ are nicely named cross-breeds.  If you want a purebred dog, get a purebred.  If you want a cross-breed, adopt from a shelter.

Post # 10
Member
1864 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2017

Please don’t spend thousands of dollars on a mixed breed dog.

Post # 11
Member
939 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2019

I agree with everyone else. I’d be very surprised if you could find a reputable breeder breeding this mix. The “hybrid vigor” thing is technically true, but if the breeders aren’t genetically and physically health testing the parents, it’s a moot point. Also, because it’s not a breed, you could end with a mess of a dog. 

Why do you want this mix, and not just a cavalier or a poodle?

Post # 12
Hostess
2251 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2017

sugarcloud :  if you want a great family pet, get a golden retriever. My sister has one that’s dumb as bricks but he’s amazing with the baby and everything.

Post # 13
Member
1281 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2019

sugarcloud :  I’d like to add another note

It is very hard to find a cross-breed that’s bred ethically. Because reputable breeders wouldn’t waste their time with cross breeds.

The vast majority (I would hazard a guess to say it’s far higher than any purebred animal) come from puppy mills and backyard breeders. Both only in it to make a buck, with the latter usually breeding their dog “just because she/he’d be a good parent” or “just once before we fix him/her up”. Puppy mills are more vicious, because the health and hygeine is second to the price tag.

Both are dangerous and breed bad dogs.

Just because they’re everywhere, doesn’t mean they should be, or that the owners performed due diligence in selecting a puppy. Likely they saw one in the window at the pet store and impulse-purchased (literally it’s what both my Mum and sister did) without paying mind to where these animals come from.

I second ladyvk – but I’m biased, I have a golden retriever and he’s the light of my life. And I sleep soundly at night knowing I bought from a registered breeder, who let us visit the puppies weekly from when they were 4 weeks old. We knew exactly where they came from, the conditions they were raised in, and sighted the health records of both parents. His pedigree is still on our fridge, showing his lineage through 4 generations. I know more about his bloodline than my own!

You can never know the bloodline of a cross-breed. I will never support an industry like that. Darling Husband and I were resigned to the fact we wouldn’t be getting the dog we wanted as the wait-times for local retrievers with breeders here was over 12 months. We got lucky. But, we had set up appointments with local rescues before we got the call about our boy.

Whatever you do, wherever you get your dog from, please make sure you know exactly where he/she comes from. Otherwise you’re just feeding into an industry that marginalises the poor creatures we have bred to literally depend entirely on us. Breaks my heart.

Post # 14
Member
701 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2018

sugarcloud :  I can totally understand that cuteness is a factor. It’s only human! However, I really want to point out that dogs of pretty much any breed can make excellent family pets if raised and trained right. Depending on the age of your kids, it might also make sense to get a more sturdy dog. If you have babies or toddlers, they might try to pick up the dog or fall on top of it while trying to walk. A toy breed could well be injured like that while even a beagle size dog wouldn’t. Have you talked to your local shelter? There are brilliant shelters with people who truly know the dogs they’re trying to find a home for. They’d be able to help you find a dog (and it needn’t be a puppy) which has the right temperament. If you’d rather have a dog that doesn’t shed, do consider a standard poodle. They’re much sturdier than the toy poodles, and they definitely don’t shed. Highly trainable, too, and you’re more likely to find a reputable breeder.

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