(Closed) this article is freaking me out

posted 8 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
14186 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

If egg count goes down, there are always ways to “make” your body make more eggs. Medicine to the rescue =]

Post # 4
Member
2821 posts
Sugar bee

Oh Tabloid Science…..how I loathe you.

So…………they’re busting our non-existant balls. No doubt fertility declines as you get older but this study needs a bit of caveats. 

1)  First of all , 10% of eggs is still like you have 30,000 eggs left. 

2) At 25 you only have 22% of eggs left….you know why, because they’re comparing it to what you have in utero (yes little baby fetus girls have lots of eggs but no one cries that we should impregnate fetuses – sorry inappropriate joke but it’s misleading science they’re giving out)

 

Post # 5
Member
7082 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2009

This preys upon womens’ already strong fear that they are going to be infertile by the time they get around to having kids.  My cohort is doing just fine, thank you… and yes, some may have needed a little extra help, but by and large my friends have been in control of their fertility and having beautiful babies!

Post # 6
Member
711 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

Dude, i’m so over these reports. yes, it’s true that you’re more fertile and more likely to have healthy babies the younger you are, but some of us just are not on that track. i just turned 30 and want kids SOMEDAY…but i’ll be 31 when I get maried…I’m not gonna rush into this just so I can pop out a kid BEFORE IT’S TOO LATE!!!!

Also, there are just as many reports about men’s sperm and age as there are women’s eggs and age. Where are those freaking stores?????

grrrr….

Post # 7
Member
7779 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

Just scare tactics. I would ignore it.

Yes, it is proven that your egg count falls as you age, but it’s not as big of a deal as that article makes it out to be.

Post # 9
Member
445 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2009

Those stories are so damned stupid. I married last year at 41. Got pregnant within a month. A month! Sadly, I miscarried, but got pregnant again within 3 months of that and am halfway through the pregnancy and everything is going awesome. Will have baby at 42. Had a good friend just have a naturally conceived baby at 44. My Mother-In-Law had a naturally conceived baby at 47. Not bad for a bunch of old bags with hardly any eggs left, huh?

I swear they’re just trying to drum up business for the IVF people.

Post # 10
Member
1145 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2000

Agreed, me and about 98% of my friends did it naturally. Most of us 34+ with multiple births. (I’m on my first.)

Post # 12
Member
2695 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2008

It def. exaggerates but it *does* happen. I work with a woman who was married and purposefully waited until she was 35 for baby #1.  She got pregnant first try but then when she tried for #2 a few years later, she had basically run out of eggs.  She was very vocal about telling all of us to at least think about the potential downsides to waiting….obviously don’t have kids just for a reason like this, but if you are married, make sure to talk to your ob-gyn if you deliberately are deciding to wait until later in your 30s so yo uare making a fully informed choice….

Post # 13
Member
649 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: February 2010

@Janna19 – I’ve heard stories like that as well. It was my understanding that it is not possible to determine accurately how many eggs you have left, and certainly more than one mature egg can be released at any cycle. So, a doctor would not be able to tell you with certainty how much time you have left to conceive.

Can anyone enlighten me on this point?

Post # 14
Member
14186 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

I have been told that they cannot tell you how many eggs you have, BUT they can count the follicles that produce the eggs and that can give them an idea of your fertility. The more follicles=the more eggs. A vaginal ultrasound can tell you this. Personally, i have a very low # on the left and an average but low # on the right. If i ever had problems with fertility, they’d load up the right side with eggs because the left side only has a couple and cannot produce as many. I got the impression from my RE it’s more related to the follicle count.

Post # 15
Member
183 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

Ladies,

Thank you for these encouraging words.  I’m getting married at 37 (and I have PCOS).  We REALLY want kids and in fact are going to a “pre concetion counseling” session with my doctor next week to find out what we need to be doing to be pregant within a year after our wedding.  Friends who have had these appointments said that they walked away greatly encouraged.  I hope this will be the same for us.

Post # 16
Member
2695 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2008

I don’t really know much more and what I do know is possibly mis-informed since it came from this one woman and I didn’t do any research!  All I know is that women who are making the decision to delay into their later 30s (vs. not yet having a partner) should make sure they are as informed as possible when making that decision.

@Miso – best of luck! I know far more people who have been able to conceive in their late 30s than not, so hope all goes well with you as well.

The topic ‘this article is freaking me out’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors