(Closed) Tightlacing anyone?

posted 5 years ago in Dress
Post # 3
Member
8483 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2014

I have no experience with it, but I know it takes a lot of training and practice.

Post # 4
Member
2055 posts
Buzzing bee

@Miss2Mrs_Beerlover: Have you ever worn a real corset before you purchased this one? It can yield fabulous results, but I really don’t recommend wearing a waist training corset for the first time on your wedding day.

I would wait until after your first alterations appointment before deciding whether to follow through with the tight lacing.

Post # 5
Member
458 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I haven’t done it, I just watched a bunch of YouTube videos on it one night while I was bored. I’m pretty sure it takes a very long time to see any results, I’m not sure if it will do you much good before your wedding. I’d spend my energy working with a seamstress to see what sorts of alterations magic could be done.

Post # 6
Member
2076 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014 - British Columbia

@Miss2Mrs_Beerlover:  

 

If you have at least 5 weeks to spare, you should check out Sweet Carousel Corsetry.

 

Yes, you can waist train with an under-bust corset, but you should probably ask Elise. (She is the owner/operator of Sweet Carousel) She’s worked with Lady Gaga and Madeleine Horn; I have one brocade corset custom-made by her when she first started out her business. She actually has an online corset-training group on Facebook, I think. (She’s also got Instagram for her business)

 

Good luck!

 

P.S. Sweet Carousel had an underbust corset sale just a month or two ago.

 

Post # 7
Member
1222 posts
Bumble bee

I don’t think tightlacing is something you can do for just one day. Tightlacing is literally changing your waist measurement anywhere from 4-6 inches or sometimes more and tightening your ribcage to the point that they stay in that shape even when a corset is removed. It’s supposed to require 23/7 training (one hour alotted for showering), which means you have to sleep in a corset, which is not the most comfortable thing ever. Not only that, but trying to waist train in a hurry could potentially permantently damage your organs. It is definitely not something I would reccomend just to get into a dress for one day because of the amount of dedication it takes, and the expense of getting a quality, custom-made corset (you could easily buy a brand new dress with that money!). 

Now, you can try a corset, just not tightlacing; a corset should reduce your waist by around 2 inches. It’s still expensive to get a good one (which definitely makes a huge difference in comfort), but it wouldn’t require anything more than breaking it in, so to speak. Make sure you order one from a reputable corset-maker, with steel boning and not plastic; check, recheck, and triple check their measurement reqiurements, as most corset makers want you to give a measurement anywhere from 2-4 inches smaller than your actual waist measurement, so you get the appropriate cinching effect. Also, make sure you’re lacing it properly (it should be tied in the middle, not at the top or the bottom, as the middle is where you want the tightening. This can be done with one lace; I can send you a link to a tutorial if you’d like. You will probably need help lacing it, though). Also, a good corset should not constrict your breathing (as it is tightened below your lungs), nor should it be uncomfortably tight or poke/prod you; it should feel like a tight hug.

A combination of a regular corset as well as having the dress let out what little it can be let out should probably suit your needs, since it is only one size off.

Post # 8
Member
2497 posts
Buzzing bee

@Miss2Mrs_Beerlover:  If it’s only one size too small, can you try to get it let out? That seems more reasonable than trying to change the size of your ribcage.

ETA: I see that you have a few months before your wedding. Is dieting an option? I think one size should be doable in four months.

Post # 9
Member
2076 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014 - British Columbia

@ForeverBirds:  +1

Agreed with no plastic. Corsets are also a pain to clean; you can only dry-clean/spot-clean steel-boned corsets.

OP would be looking to spend at least $250 and up for a good quality corset.

 

Post # 11
Member
3638 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

I would certainly say to wait until your first fitting before diving head first into all of this. You never know the wondering that can be worked on dresses. It may be possible to add more fabric to panel which is under the lacing of the corest back, thus making the corset bigger. 

For now, perhaps just get used to wearing the corset on under all of your clothes, before trying to tighen it enough to squish you.

Post # 12
Member
2055 posts
Buzzing bee

@Miss2Mrs_Beerlover:  In that case, what little I do now is that it’s recommended that you wear a corset liner to protect your skin, and gradually increase the tightness of the lacing and amount of time you wear it.

I know people have all sorts of (mis)conceptions about tightlacing, but if this is what you want to do, and you’ve done your research…by all means. I’ve looked into tightlacing before, but wasn’t quite motivated enough to start. So, good luck and let us know how it all turns out!

Post # 13
Member
1222 posts
Bumble bee

@Miss2Mrs_Beerlover:  Obviously, it is all completely up to you, but would you rather wear a corset for months and months or just for a few days (to break it in and on your wedding day)? And honestly, I’m not entirely sure you could acheive any signifigant change in just a few months- it’s meant to be a gradual thing. But if that is what you would really rather do, go for it. I would definitely wait at least until after the first fitting- as a PP said, maybe an extra panel can be added to the corset, or (depending on the dress) a few extra inches of fabric can be added to the side seams of the bodice.

Post # 14
Member
7977 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

Firstly, tightlacing will not reduce the size of your ribcage. You can’t bend bone! You will need to let the dress out for that.

Secondly, if you only need to go down one dress size, then casual lacing should be able to do that… just wear a good quality, steel boned corset on the day and that should do the trick. That’s what I’m doing!

Post # 16
Member
7977 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

@Miss2Mrs_Beerlover:  I really, really wouldn’t try to reshape your floating ribs. That is some serious shape changing, and could be damaging. The reason it’s OK to pull in all the “squishy bits” is because they have lots of give in them. If you start tugging on the bone… well, bone doesn’t have a lot of give. It tends to stay put or crack.

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