(Closed) To Vaccinate your baby or not!?

posted 8 years ago in Babies
Post # 92
Member
4474 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 2012

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@AB Bride:  You’re an excellent example of why herd immunity’s so important.  Anti-vaxers put people like you at risk for these diseases, since you can’t take all these vaccines.

Post # 94
Member
3354 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

PLEASE VACCINATE YOUR CHILDREN!

Post # 95
Member
9815 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

Oh for goodness sake. Vaccinate your children.

Post # 96
Member
5654 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2011

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@vorpalette:  I couldn’t say if vaccines “contain” cells from the cell line but they are used to produce them (some of them not all). I didn’t get that information from Google but from the inserts. Here’s what it says in the Merck MMR II insert 1st page 

“the Wistar RA 27/3 strain of live attenuated rubella virus propagated in WI-38 human diploid lung fibroblasts.1,2”

I’m definirely aware I’m in the min

Post # 97
Member
5540 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2011

Yes. For the love of all that is holy and the immunocompromised, YES. Baring an allergy to vaccine ingrediants I think there shouldn’t be a way to opt out. Herd immunity only works when the herd is vaccinated. If not, then stuff like kids dying from 100% preventable diseases happens. I think it should be child abuse to not. You have moral objections to vaccines? I have moral objects to you potentially exposing people to deadly dieases that are totally preventable

Post # 98
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3679 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

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@runsyellowlites:  

“Some if not all”

I encourage you to do more research about this before you make decisions that could affect the health of your child and others.

Post # 99
Member
963 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

I don’t understand how vaccination is even an issue. Vaccines are the only reason that many deadly diseases are no longer prevalent. We should always look for ways to improve the effectiveness of our vaccines and reduce the side effects. But looking at the decrease in childhood diseases and infant/childhood mortality, it’s very clear that vaccination is responsible for saving many millions of lives.

Post # 100
Member
1684 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

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@runsyellowlites:  

There’re a lot of medical advances that have resulted from research that was way more ethically questionable than aborted fetuses (like it was done on extant humans without their consent or knowledge) that would be criminal today.

I know this is off topic, but I wonder, as a genuine question, not something I want to argue about, if your child (or yourself) required a treatment that was derived from research you consider immoral (for instance using stem cells) and would die without it, would you consent to the treatment?

Post # 101
Member
1853 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: December 2013

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “some vaccines such as rubella and varicella [were] made from human cell-line cultures, and some of these cell lines originated from aborted fetal tissue, obtained from legal abortions in the 1960s. No new fetal tissue is needed to produce cell lines to make these vaccines, now or in the future.” These vaccines have effectively eradicated a major source of child morbidity and mental retardation in the U.S.

Post # 102
Member
3679 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

Forget stem cell treatment, how about chemotherapy? Monoclonal antibody treatments against cancer or as are coming out now, against Alzheimers and other diseases? Hormone replacement therapy?

Cell lines have been instrumental in research and the development of therapies against a wide variety of diseases.

I can’t even fathom the logic behind exposing your child to easily preventable diseases that can kill/maim/etc in the name of standing up for a fetus that was aborted over 50 years ago. I am in no way advocating abortion, but what’s done is done in this case. That fetus’ life has saved the lives of countless people.

 

Post # 103
Member
1853 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: December 2013

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@cmbr:  This entire thread inspired me to reopen my old biology and immunology textbooks. Thread jacking, but props for going for your phD in immunology. Looking forward to your contributions to the scientific community! 

Post # 104
Member
192 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: April 2013 - ceremony at a gazebo outside, reception at neighboring restaurant on a lake

There isn’t any evidence supporting vaccines being truly dangerous to children. 

Where is your husband getting his research?  He can’t just trust something off of google.  It needs to be a peer-reviewed journal article.  EVEN THOSE CAN’T ALWAYS BE TRUSTED.  To know if an article is trustworthy, you must read it, look at the methodology the researchers used, the statistical model they employed, the research funding, and many other factors.  Remember, many papers published have a 1st or 2nd year graduate student that did most of the research and they could have a primary investigator (their advisor) who is hands off and didn’t make sure all of the research was sound. 

Bottom line: you can’t believe everything you read online.  Your husband has to really trust the data he is finding to decide to put other people around your children with weakened immune systems in jeopardy. 

Good luck with your decision!

Post # 105
Member
3679 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

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@Shera2550:  

And even then, you can’t trust everything you read in PubMed because with the budget cuts and increased pressure to perform to get published and receive grants, certain people have falsified data. Check out anything to come out of Michael Karin’s lab. ZING!

But I digress.

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@the_future_mrs: 

Thanks! It’s the hardest and worst thing that I’ve ever done, but I never would have met Fiance otherwise. Hopefully only a year, year and half left.

Post # 106
Member
963 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

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@Shera2550:  I agree with you. I’ll also add that you really shouldn’t make such a big decision based on one paper. If there’s a big discovery that’s valid, then there will always be additional research and follow-up studies. The peer review process isn’t perfect, but most researchers are smart enough to know a good idea when they see it and will be inclined to further investigate it.

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