(Closed) Toddler not eating real food -scenario

posted 3 years ago in Parenting
Post # 2
Member
5857 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: July 2018

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MeandYou :  I would not be feeding a toddler cakes, biscuits or fries. 

Post # 3
Member
4097 posts
Honey bee

I have a son who has always been at the bottom of the growth charts. He also did not show interest in food for quite a while. I have always stuck to healthy foods and give him a variety at every meal (i.e. fruit, veggie, starch/carb, and protein). If I think he will stuff himself on fruit or bread, I first offer the other items and may give him a piece or two of the fruit or bread to entice him to start eating. I’ve also found some veggies are more successful than others like peas and corn. At first I did need to add butter and a tiny bit of salt to get him going, but now he eats them plain with no issue. If your LO is used to constantly getting treats, they are not going to want to eat the healthier stuff, so I would make sure you are always offering healthy things. A baked french fry or roll here and there is not a problem…donuts, cakes, etc. are and I wouldn’t even bring those into your regular food equation. I would never stop offering the healthy items, and you may find that at some meals your LO is more interested in protein and then the next meal they’ll want carbs. They are pretty good at balancing out their nutrition as long as you continue to offer a variety at every meal.

I have also had really good luck with mixing a toddler protein powder in his milk, especially on days where he hasn’t eaten much. The one I get is organic and is called Pedia Smart by Nature’s One.

Post # 4
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1897 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2017

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MeandYou :  Giving into the child will create a picky eater. My philosiphy is give the child a meal, if they dont eat what is in front of them, then they dont eat. It was the way I was raised, and I eat just about everything. 

Post # 7
Member
9526 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2013

lot of factors in play:

how old is the toddler?

were they a good eater before and suddenly started being picky?

how are mealtimes handled at home?  everybody eating the same thing or different things?

 

ETA: we did BLW and my now 17m old is a fantastic eater.  he does go through some times where he skips meals for whatever reason.  maybe he doesn’t like what i’m serving.  i don’t give him something else.  i do give a cup of milk before we get ready for bed.  but my philosophy is, if he is hungry, he will eat.

 

my mom was a short order cook for my brother and me.  and we were both very picky eaters. 

Post # 8
Member
4953 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2018

My godbrother is 16 years younger than me and I used to babysit a lot when he was little. He was a picky eater as a toddler and my godparents would always have me give him a plate of regular food. They’re generally pretty healthy eaters, and my godmom is a fantastic cook. If he didn’t eat, he got one of those toddler nutrition shakes to make sure he was getting enough calories. He’s in elementary school now and not any pickier than a kid should be. 

Post # 10
Member
950 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

I let my son become a picky eater and I regret it SO much. I had him young, in NYC where delivery and take out is huge and in abundance. I was also in graduate school for 3 years when he was young and learning to eat (ages 2-5). I also wasn’t much of a cook, so between all that, I threw down whatever I could. In hindsight, I woulds have done much better and differently – but I guess we all have regrets as parents!

Post # 11
Member
4097 posts
Honey bee

Man I really wasted my time on a hypothetical…

Post # 13
Member
620 posts
Busy bee

I have a toddler who has never gained weight well and always been at the very bottom of the charts. She had allergies and food intolerances and eating was not a pleasant thing for her, creating some aversions and feeding difficulties. She would never, ever take formula or even bottles of breastmilk. So, at dr’s advice, we have always just had to feed her things she will eat and try to be creative about getting healthier foods into her. That’s just made me relax my standards a LOT. I would love for my kid to happily munch on veggies and proteins but if all we can get in her is some yogurt or even, God forbid, french fries, then okay. 

I’m of the opinion that there’s a lot worse things my child can be than a picky eater. My husband is picky and it doesn’t seem to have harmed him in any way. It’s inconvenient, but sometimes it’s not about your parenting choices or what you did right or wrong, but just who your kid is. God knows I did everything by the books to try to get my kid to be a healthy, well-rounded eater, but at the end of the day, she’s just not and we do what we can. I’m also of the opinion that children are not just little blank slates for us to write on and they have opinions and wants and desires that deserve to be respected. My toddler has no say over what I make for dinner, so if it’s something she doesn’t want, I don’t force her to eat it or go hungry. That’s not to say I will give her ANYTHING she wants then, but I will offer reasonable alternatives like oatmeal or yogurt. There are times that I don’t want a meal, even one I’ve planned, and choose to eat something else, so I allow her to do the same. 

Some of this might sound really defensive or harsh, but I just don’t think everything is wrapped up in our parenting choices. Some kids are picky, some kids aren’t. You don’t have to give your kid french fries or cake if you don’t want to, but offering some alternatives here and there isn’t the end of the world, and the occasional treat to encourage kids to eat is also not ruining them. 

Post # 14
Member
8987 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

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MeandYou :  we plan on doing baby led weaning with our daughter. To start most food is just for fun and they are still getting their main nutrition from breast milk or formula. As she gets old she can have options but they will all be healty or else she can skip a meal – she won’t starve. I know parents that are short-order cooks and it’s tiring and expensive. My mom made one dinner (and we all took turns picking what that would be) and if someone didn’t like it they could make a PBJ or a bowl of cereal for themselves. 

Post # 15
Member
4275 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

Listen, my kid eats everything under the freaking sun. And I didn’t do any of the things you’re “supposed” to do. He just loves food. Honestly, it’s just dumb luck.

I agree that there are way worse things than a picky eater, and I think it’s really easy to SAY you should just let them go to bed hungry, but way harder to DO. I’m an adult and I don’t love every food. It’s unrealistic to expect my kid will.

 

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