(Closed) Traditions and Cultures – I'm curious!

posted 8 years ago in Traditions
Post # 32
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1684 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

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@Stace126:  

Yet some people act like a registry list in an invite is equivalant to nude photos or something. 

Now that would make for an exciting wedding invitation!

 

As far as different traditions, I moved from the US to Sweden. Here we have no halloween, the little kids come around dressed up for Easter instead. (Easter witches need candy to fuel their flight to the witches sabbath at Blåkulla. 😉 There is no Thanksgiving, but we do a Thanksgiving dinner every year and invite Swedish friends and family to come try traditional American Thanksgiving food. It’s always a blast because they’ve only ever seen it in movies.

Christmas is Jul, and Santa is a gnome with a goat. (Actually the gnome is a later addition, originally, I believe, he was just a goat.) He also comes and distributes presents on Julafton (Christmas eve). Usually, most unfortunately for the dad in the house, this happens just when he’s stepped out to get the paper. (Mr. E and I usually have Jul with his family on Julafton, but save our personal present exchange until Christmas morning.)

As far as weddings, I think they are much more low key. Oh, both partners get an engagement ring, and they are just simple bands, like Americans usually choose for wedding bands. Bling is unusual, though it’s becoming a little more common, mostly due, I think, to the prevelance of American media influence. Not that common though, as none of our engaged friends are sporting rocks.

Oh, the whole engagement timeline thing is not really an issue. Many of the Swedish women of my aquaintance in their late twenties and thirties live with their partners, but aren’t married yet, and there is none of this timeline leave date drama pressure. I think partly because there is not the same hard division of married/unmarried that you get in American culture. We even have a distinct word for “partner that you cohabit with” and this is a recognized relationship, not just socially but officially. It’s normal for couples to live together for years, even have children together, before they marry.

Formal dinners, like a wedding reception, can last hours because there is much speechifying (anyone can make one, though there’s usually a toastmaster to help coordinate them) and also periodically everyone stands up and sings. You may even get a booklet with your dinner that has words to the many songs planned, and notes about the accompanying tune, especially if there are made up words that go with the event. It’s very Swedish to make little personalized poems and dittys. There is also usually much wine and snaps to go with the hours of singing and speeches. 😉

Post # 33
Member
11231 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

@RagDoll:  I’m from Michigan, as well, but I’ve never been to a wedding where centerpieces were taken/raffled off, nor was I taught to never show up somewhere empty-handed. Granted, our get togethers (family and friends) are usually potlucks or BYOB anyway, so we usually show up wherever with something, but not always. I don’t like green bean casserole (gasp), but it wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without it.

– Cash bars are fairly common here. It really grates on me when people, especially on here, don’t realize that it’s a regional thing and get super snarky about it. It’s pretty offensive when you call something/someone rude/bad host/etc. because they’re doing something common in their area.

– Same goes for dollar dances, actually. Those are common here, as well. 

– I’ve only ever been to one wedding with a “cocktail hour.”

– No big rings. My ring is .5tcw and it’s the biggest in my family (except for my cousin’s). My grandma, aunt, and one cousin are the only three who have diamonds and they’re super small (.1 ct). Everyone else who’s married has either just a band (designs but no bling) or a turquoise ring in my great aunt’s case.

Post # 34
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6112 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

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@RagDoll:  Yes, the LDS weddings are very sweet and quaint!

 

I forgot, LDS copules married in the temple do not use wedding rings. BMs don’t do anything at a temple wedding either (they don’t stand up there or go down the aisle).

Couples that choose to do wedding rings just might put them on whenvever, just as symbols, so often no wedding band with an e-ring.

Some couples do a ring ceremony during the reception for family who wasn’t allowed to come inside the temple.  Some bishops frown upon ring ceremonies as it takes away from the sealed religious temple ceremony.

Post # 35
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3696 posts
Sugar bee

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@RagDoll:  saw that auggiefrog hadn’t replied yet about the “gap.” I’m pretty sure she’s referring to a gap in time (often a few hours) between the ceremony & reception, also sometimes called a “Catholic gap.” It’s common for church weddings, and especially so for Catholic churches, because most Catholic parishes have a regularly-scheduled 5pm Saturday Vigil Mass, and often they also have regularly scheduled Confession on Saturday afternoons, often starting around 2:30-3:00 pm. These are set-in-stone, obligatory parish activities that always trump weddings in terms of scheduling. So Catholic weddings, if you want to hold them on a Saturday, have to be scheduled morning-through-early-afternoon in most parishes. Thus, it’s very common for Catholic weddings to be done by 3pm (or earlier) but the reception doesn’t start until dinnertime.

Post # 36
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4673 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

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@KCKnd2:  yes, except that must weddings have a gap, Catholic, prodestent or non-religious.  I have never been to a wedding without one! 

Post # 37
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3696 posts
Sugar bee

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@auggiefrog:  You’re right – I got started and kind of went off on a tangent. Wink

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