(Closed) training vs weightloss

posted 6 years ago in Fitness
Post # 3
Member
679 posts
Busy bee

Try fueling your workouts by consuming any necessary carbs in the morning. And you do NEED carbs if you are going to be training for an endurance event. But remember, carbs don’t necessarily = bread, pasta, white rice, etc. Fruits are one of the biggest sources of carbs. By front-loading your carbs, you’ll give yourself more time during the day to metabolize them and burn them off.

Refuel after your runs with lots of protein. Greek yogurt, almonds, lowfat chocolate milk, etc, are all great sources of protein. Try to consume protein within 45 minutes of finishing a workout. 

Lunches and dinners should be a good balance of lean protein, fruits, vegetables, etc. 

Snack often to keep yourself energized and fueled – again, yogurt, fruits, veggies, nuts. 

Make sure you ARE eating enough calories to fuel your level of exercise though, since not doing so will cause muscle fatigue AND could put your body into “starvation mode”, meaning it will slow down the metabolism and cling to fat.

Other tips:

– Avoid gimmicky recovery products. You don’t need tons of Gu and gels and Gatorade if you’re training for a half marathon, and those actually = extra sugar and refined carbs. If you fuel and hydrate properly before and after runs, you should be fine to consume water during the run, and maybe some honey during the run if you feel you need it. These are the best gels I could find in terms of nutrition: http://shop.honeystinger.com/products/Ginsting.html They are all natural. You can also experiment with ingesting things like dried fruits to refuel during a run (figs, dates, and apricots are good for this.) If you find yourself feeling dehydrated after a run, skip the Gatorade (so much refined sugar) and have a glass of water with a pinch of salt and a splash of lemon juice to replace electrolytes. 

– Ignore the hype about extreme carb-loading. Research has shown that what most people define as carb-loading is not consistent with what actually works to store glycogen in the muscles. Carb-loading does not mean stuffing yourself with huge plates of pasta and bread the night before a long run or race. If you simply eat balanced meals of proteins, and some carbs, you are already getting what you need. In the 48 hours before the race, it may be helpful to ingest slightly more carbs than usual, while resting your muscles, to optimize glycogen build-up, but you don’t need to be overdoing it on the carbs during training.

– If at all possible, incorporate strength training/weight lifting into your workout routine, at least once a week. It can be very hard to lose weight through running/cardio alone. Weight lifting really boosts the metabolism, not to mention it helps strengthen bones and increase muscle endurance – all good things if you want to avoid injury training for and running a half marathon.

Good luck! 

 

Post # 5
Member
679 posts
Busy bee

If you feel like you are experiencing muscle fatigue, try eating something about an hour before each run. I find a banana with peanut butter, or a bit of yogurt with almonds mixed in, sit pretty easy in the stomach and offer a good mix of protein/carbs. And again, make sure you’re consuming protein within 45 minutes of your workout.

I’d also recommend eating back more than 70% of the calories you burned – maybe try closer to 90%?? That could make a difference in your energy levels, and you’ll still have a defecit. 

You probably won’t lose a whole lot of weight training for a running event, unless you have a whole lot to lose in the first place. But you won’t gain fat, either. If you do see a gain or you don’t see a loss, remember that your muscles are attempting to stockpile glycogen and repair themselves, too, which leads to water retention. 

Post # 6
Hostess
18643 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

I know it’s hard but don’t forget that you lose weight by net calories.  When you are training for an event, you burn more calories than if you were just sitting on the couch so you need to eat back some of the calories that you are burning so you aren’t sending your body into deprivation mode.

Post # 8
Hostess
18643 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

Hiding the scale might help.  Unless you are still have a lot of weight to lose, you might be reducing your caloric intake too low.  Eating before working out will probably help as well.  I can’t really eat much after working out most times.

Post # 9
Member
679 posts
Busy bee

A run usually burns roughly 100 calories/mile, or 100 calories/10 minutes. If you’re uncomfortable trusting a calorie-counting device, try and keep that particular formula in mind. 1200 calories a day seems very low to me, especially for someone training for a race.

Hide the scale! Go by how your clothes fit and how strong you feel. And if it makes you feel better, mentally, just try to incorporate some of the healthier fueling options I listed above. Salt water with lemon instead of Gatorade, honey or dried fruit instead of Gu, etc. 

Post # 10
Member
267 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I’ve always had trouble losing weight by running alone. When you’re training for an endurance event, like a half marathon, your body tends to resist weight loss. It thinks you need those stores of fat to convert to energy.

25 pounds sounds like a great weight loss already, and with your exercise/diet routine you’ll have no problem maintaining the loss. But I think I would put losing more weight on the back burner until you’ve run the race. Try to focus on what your body can do, and let yourself be proud of what it can accomplish!

Post # 11
Member
2902 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 2014

I have half a scoop of protein powder in the morning before working out and half a scoop after.

The brand I use has zero carbs & zero sugar and 15gms of protein (per half scoop) which is pretty good. Also, only 60 cals if you mix with water rather than milk.

 

 

Post # 12
Member
2902 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 2014

Also, I should say that I lose hardly any weight by running alone. I think someone above me explained the reason.

I lose weight by lifting weights, squats etc. I used to think I would get all big and bulky but have found I just have nice lean ‘toned’ arms and tummy. My legs and arse still need to come to the party though, they really do take much longer to tone up 🙁

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