(Closed) Trying to figure out feeding the baby and returning to work…

posted 3 years ago in Babies
  • poll: What is the most realistic option?
    Breastfeed exclusively during maturity leave then switch to formula when I return to work : (10 votes)
    36 %
    Breastfeed for the first few weeks and gradually switch to formula during the day a few weeks before : (8 votes)
    29 %
    Formula from the beginning : (3 votes)
    11 %
    Other....I will explain in a post! : (7 votes)
    25 %
  • Post # 2
    Member
    62 posts
    Worker bee

    I have a friend who pumps at night & freezes the access milk allowing for the baby to consume only breastmilk. Would that kind of work for you? I don’t have any children, so I’m unsure of how it works for other moms! 

    Post # 3
    Member
    62 posts
    Worker bee

    Oh & trying never hurts! If baby doesn’t take, I’m sure that switching to formula wouldn’t hurt baby. 

    Post # 4
    Member
    1402 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: February 2011

    Nursing only at night might work out ok if baby was slightly older and your supply was better regulated but without the demand created by regular pumping or nursing your body is most likely going to struggle to maintain supply. There are definitely benefits to bf’ing in the very early weeks so it’s certainly not a waste of time to do so. Would it be possible for you to pump even once a day at work? Even one decent pump session a day is going to give you a much better chance of nursing any length of time and will also help with any possible engorgment. 

    My other suggestion would be to get in touch with either an IBCLC, LLL or local breastfeeding support group BEFORE baby is due so you can get some pro advice and figure out the best course of action for you and baby – good luck to you!

    Post # 6
    Member
    4059 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: August 2012

    Is it possible to pump but not store it (so pump and dump)? I mean it would be a waste, but doing it for a few weeks would at least help until your body regulates your supply,  and help with discomfort for you. 

    Post # 7
    Member
    4426 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: December 2013

    MissBridge:  Nursing exclusively at night will be hard to set up that young. You would need several weeks of breastfeeding to really establish and maintain your supply before that could be an option. Your job MUST provide you with a location (NOT a bathroom) to pump and the time to do so, but I honestly do not know if they have to provide the storage. Plus, I’m pretty sure you only have to sanitize the pump once/day and the other times your just rinse and dry. 

    I too went back to work when DS was 6 weeks and attempted breastfeeding. There were many factors that made it not the right choice for me–and I really grappled with this and felt guilty. 6 weeks is not a lot of time at all and for me, personally, the stress of breastfeeding (DS didn’t have a great latch, and one of my nipples scabed to the point my milk wouldn’t come out) along with the time restraint just didn’t make it work. I breastfeed for about a week, but formula felt like the right choice so we started supplementing with it at about a week old. DS has been on formula since and it works great for him. I do still wish all of the stress factors had been removed (well, the outside factors) and I could have breastfed longer. 

    I say trust your gut and so your best not to feel guilty or less than for whatever choice works best for your family. 

    Post # 8
    Member
    1309 posts
    Bumble bee

    Your job is obligated to provide you with a place and privacy to pump. I would talk to your HR department before making any decisions.

    Post # 9
    Member
    1309 posts
    Bumble bee

    Also – you can pump in a car! I’ve done it many many times. And make a cooler with lots of ice packs to keep it cold til you are home. 

    Post # 10
    Member
    2021 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: September 2013

    Yah and they have coolers that plug into the outlet in the car so you can keep milk through the day. 

    Post # 12
    Member
    4426 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: December 2013

    MissBridge:  Awesome. Each Mom has to do what’s best for her and her baby. I had a gut feeling the second day we were in the hospital that breastfeeding wasn’t for me, but I wanted to give it a fair shot. After a couple of days and incredibly painful feeding sessions, we switched and I felt so much better. Don’t let anyone make you feel bad for this choice. My husband and family were supportive of whatever I chose and that helped a lot. 

    Post # 13
    Member
    9811 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper
    • Wedding: September 2013

    MissBridge:  I would probably try to just breastfeed and then if you need to supplement with formula go ahead and do that.  The reason I would try BFing first is because you just don’t know, it may come very easy for you and baby.   It’s not always hard to figure out.  I will say that you can definitely breastfeed only at night and use formula during the day.  But your supply will not be the same (you will lose some) so you will also probably need to supplement during weekends.  But it can be done, I quit pumping at 12 months and Boyfriend or Best Friend my toddler for another year beyond that just at home.  So you don’t dry up completely or anything- it’s just that your supply adjusts to meet the demands placed upon it.  So no, you won’t get engorged after a few days/week.  Your supply adjusts in that way.  I probably only produced 8-15oz a day after I quit pumping at work (depending on how much she wanted to nurse).  Down from probably about 30oz when I EBF (pumped at work).

    And FWIW, if you have a car, I have pumped in my car plenty of times (just using a nursing cover) and I stored milk in my own cooler (no refrigeration necessary). And you don’t need to sterlize a pump.  Medela makes some wipes you can use just to wipe down the flanges and that is sufficient.  I never washed at work, just rinsed out.  You don’t need to sterilize anything unless you have a premie or otherwise immuno-compromised child.  Doesn’t mean that it’s for you, but it can be done if you want it to work.

    Post # 14
    Member
    3420 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: June 2016

    You’ve gotten plenty of great advice already. I just want to say, you can use your car to pump and store milk. Use a breast feeding cover if you need more privacy. Then store it in your car. Or drive home on a break? They are required to make it work, so you can talk to a manager about getting you the necessary equipmen, even if it isn’t typically there. You can make it work. And there’s no harm in trying!

    Post # 15
    Member
    2942 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: May 2014

    You have a lot of good advice on how to try to make breast feeding work, but I just wanted to add, don’t feel guilty about not breast feeding if it doesn’t work out.  Some mom’s who have every advantage to make it work (flexable work palce, place to pump and store) just can’t because their body doesn’t let them.  Some mom’s don’t have any work protections because their company is too small/no paid time off and are back at work before they can set in breast feeding.  Some have babies that aren’t good at breast feeding.  Some have supply problems that they can’t help.

    A lot of research is now showing while there are some early benefits to breast feeding, feeding your baby is the priorty.  If it doesn’t work out for you, don’t feel like you are horrible or are letting your baby down/failed in some way. 

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