TTC Question

posted 2 months ago in TTC
Post # 2
Member
201 posts
Helper bee

IUI and timed intercourse are usually medicated.  I am just not sure what  other options you are looking for?  

Post # 3
Member
6847 posts
Busy Beekeeper

lavendarbee123 :  how are your husband’s numbers? If he has good sperm and you feel more comfortable with the less invasive option then definitely start there. However speaking from my own experience my docs recommended IVF right away and I requested the less invasive option and started at IUI. I was so sad when it (predictably) failed. It was part of the journey and I think I needed that to be comfortable with IVF, but it’s something to keep in mind. Also I know it seems invasive, but IUI isn’t that bad at all compared to IVF. 

Post # 4
Member
170 posts
Blushing bee

How long have you been trying? Do you have any other known fertility issues? Have you explored all the options for treatment for PCOS? 

There are lots of ladies with PCOS (myself included) who have been able to get pregnant naturally with some extra time, supplements and cycle tracking but lots need intervention. I know when I was starting the fertility journey the dr’s jumped right to the opinion that I wouldn’t be able to get pregnant on my own and needed intervention. I was so discouraged and heartbroken and wanted to try everything and anything before starting medical intervention. I was extremely fortunate and found out we were pregnant 5 days before our intake appointment at the clinic. 

I’m sorry you’re going through this journey and I hope you’re able to get some answers before you take the next step. 

Post # 5
Member
641 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2017

Do you track your ovulation? And have you had labs to see about insulin, thyroid, and progesterone levels? I was able to concive my first with 10 months of metformin. You could possible have Clomid or Femera without monitoring for a few months too. Plus luteal phase progesterone can help with PCOS. I wouldn’t jump into IUI unless you’ve been tracking and trying for a while and it’s not happening. 

Post # 7
Member
170 posts
Blushing bee

lavendarbee123 :  coming off BC can be really difficult.. I know for lots of ladies it takes up to a year for them to have a cycle on their own. There are tons of things you can try for PCOS before jumping to IUI and I’d def recommend trying a few (diet, supplements, metformin). They don’t always work for everyone but lifesyle changes can have a huge impact on your cycle. ultimately it’s up to how much time you’re willing to wait and try before beginning intervention and if there are any other factors (which you’ve said there weren’t). Did your partner get a workup too?

Post # 9
Member
2033 posts
Buzzing bee

I’m confused. You can do as many IUI’s as you want but if you’re not ovulating, it’s pointless. What are your reservations on femara & timed intercourse? I have PCOS and used femara to conceive and the monitoring was only one ultrasound appointment. Is your doctor requiring a lot more? Femara was covered with my insurance and only cost me about $5. 

Have you looked into/discussed provera to jumpstart your cycle? 

Post # 10
Member
641 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2017

lavendarbee123 :  You got labs done; what were the results? Do you have just a reversed LH/FSH ratio, or also elevated androgens and insulin resistance? If you have insulin resistance, you can try myo-inositol and eating a diabetic diet. Myo-inositol works similar to Metformin but is over the counter. Also if you have high testosterone or androgens you can cut out dairy which is supposed to help with that. I would look for an ob or re who is willing to try Metformin first if that’s what you want. Also sometimes a low dose of the steroid dexamethasone is supposed to help with PCOS. Some doctors are starting to prescribe that with Metformin so maybe you can try one who does.

As far as tracking, I would start paying attention to cervical mucus. You can plug it into fertility friend just to see if you are having any fertile mucus at all. That would indicate you’re at least trying to ovulate. 

Post # 11
Member
943 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2020 - Las Vegas, NV

I don’t have PCOS but I did get pregnant in the same month I started Metformin. 

Post # 12
Member
641 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2017

lavendarbee123 :  Also vitamin D is usually low in women with PCOS so talking that daily should help. 

Post # 13
Member
6719 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: Boy #1 12/2015, boy #2 02/2018

As others have mentioned, I would highly suggest to chart/track your cycles. It’s good to know whether you are ovulating or not. Give it a try! 

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