(Closed) Ugh, the nerve of some people…..pet problems. What are your thoughts?

posted 8 years ago in Pets
  • poll: Pet person or not....do you have a problem with off leash dogs that ARE trained and under control?

    No, as long as it is well behaved and stays away from me.

    Not a problem, I actually like it when they come up and greet me. They are so cute and cuddly. :)

    Yes, all dogs should be leashed, at all times.

    Yes, all dogs should stay at home and not be allowed in public places.

  • Post # 47
    Member
    2552 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: May 2013

    Meh. I love animals and how you trained your dog speaks very well of you as an owner… but honestly, I am just fed up with people and their dogs in general. This morning, there was a massive dog fight right outside our window at who knows how early while we were trying to sleep. One was on the leash and the other wasn’t. They couldnt stop the fight, the owners were yelling so loud and the dogs were screaming. I even think the smaller one got hurt. Secondly, I’m terribly allergic to dogs (even though I love them to death.) Just last week some lady’s massive dog ran up to me while I was on a jog, jumped on me, started licking my neck. I was so upset and the lady acted like it was normal despite me telling her to call her dog away. She didnt apologize even though I told her I was allergic. I had to walk home (2 miles!!) with welts on my neck and trouble breathing (allergy induced asthma.) And just a month ago, a neighbor’s dog (off the leash) ran up to me showing its teeth at me as I left my apartment. This is not acceptable and I’m getting pretty sick of it. Our city has a strict leash law and hardly anybody follows it.

    Those are examples of poorly trained dogs and I’m sure your dog is completely different. Nearly every day, I jog pass somebody who has their dog off the leash and it pays no attention to me, so that’s a good thing. But idk, I guess irresponsible dog owners see other dogs off the leash and think theirs can be too even though its not trained in the least. I’m against you or anything, this is just my point of view.

    Post # 48
    Member
    572 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: March 2012

    I believe all dogs should be leashed at all times, too. Unless you are in an off leash ONLY area where you are willing to take the risk on your own. Sounds like the lady didnt handle it well but I am sure she was both scared and upset over the situation. Nobody likes trying to reel back in their pet after an embarrassing or stressful incident.

    We have two dogs, one I would trust to be off leash, one not as much, not because he has ever shown aggression but he definitely becomes overly excited/barks at other dogs. And we trained him. And trained and trained and trained him. We used professional help and tried books and tips online we tried EVERYTHING and guess what…he still barks at other dogs. But we love him just the same. So please don’t assume every dog with a behavior issue has a lazy owner who was not willing to train their dog. You don’t love your dog more because it is well behaved. Not trying to sound snarky just offering that point of view.

    Post # 50
    Member
    4800 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: September 2011

    If someone is in a place that allows dogs to be off-leash then they shouldn’t be upset. But unless you are in a place that explicity states that you can have your dog off leash (which I would avoid such places), I think it’s irresponsible and a bit presumptous to allow your dog to be off leash, well behaved/trained or not – it’s a risk I’m not willing to take, no one should ever assume their dog would never hurt someone, they are an animal and I believe it’s part of an owner’s responsiblity to take precautions like having them on a leash in addition to proper training, because you never know what could happen. My husband lost his childhood dog thanks to his neighbors allowing their dog to be off leash. Yes, they had a very well behaved and trained dog that no one ever had any problems with. But one day while out for a walk, that dog ran into my husband’s family’s front yard (DH’s puppy was on a leash but it was a long one), and in a split second before anyone could react, their dog had killed his puppy.

    At our current home, the people across the street allow their dogs to be off leash in their front yard. I’ve flat out told them that I am uncomfortable with it, and what’s more, it is illegal in my area for their dog to be off-leash in an un-fenced area. They blew me off with the same things you said in your OP about how well trained their dogs are, and that when even when other dogs try to fight theirs do not participate, that they are sweet and mellow and never given anyone any trouble/ But none of that meant a thing to me when one day I was walking my dog and theirs suddenly ran across the street barking at us and tried to attack my dog. They were so surprised because nothing like that had ever happened before – but they are also damn lucky that I was able to get my dog away from theirs and that no serious injuries were incurred, because I would have called the police and there would’ve been serious consequences for them. Even if your dog has never acted aggressive before, if the first time it happens is when the dog is off-leash and they harm a person (especially a child) or another dog, when it was a situation you easily could’ve prevented by just putting them on a leash…it just makes me so angry! It is a simple precaution and one that I do believe all pet owners should take, just in case, unless they’re in a special area where it is allowed.

    Post # 51
    Member
    4800 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: September 2011

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    @fvsoccer:  You still walk outside in the snow/ice, right? You still walk on the sidewalk with passing traffic, right? You still go out to eat, right? 

    These examples really don’t work or correspond with the example of an off-leash dog. Yes, I still walk on ice/snow , but I go slowly and try to stay in salted areas and watch my step. Yes, I walk where there is traffic, but I’m aware of my surroundings and use the crosswalk lights. Yes, I go out places, and cars are dangerous so I make sure I buckle up. My point is basically that I take precautions, and that’s exactly what a leash is – it’s a precaution. No one is saying to never take your dogs out or let them do anything, but if it’s not in an off-leash area it’s always smart to take precautions.

    Post # 52
    Member
    751 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: November 2013

    @bmo88:  I see that you live in Colorado. I do too! I have 3 dogs that are on an invisible fence and well-trained. When people walk by my house with their dogs, their dogs go nuts and mine just sit calmly and watch. I had a neighbor say that my dogs shouldn’t be allowed to be out without a “real” fence because her dogs see mine and get too excited when she is walking them, and they pull her. Or that my dogs could run through the fence and up to her dogs, which are not good with other dogs and might end up hurting mine. 

    WHAT??? It’s my fault that your dogs are not leash trained?? My dogs are on my property and they are NOT crossing the invisible fence and are behaving themselves. We have 3 acres. The invisible fence covers 1.5 acres. 

    I think that people should either train and socialize their dogs well or keep them in their backyards. We go to a dog park and some people bring their mean dogs in and a little dog got hurt. Don’t bring your dogs to dog parks if they are not socialized. 

    Sorry for the rant. It is a serious pet peeve of mine (no pun intended ;)). My dogs are also obedience and agility trained, and it took time. It’s important to spend that time if you want a well-behaved dog. A leashed dog can be just as poorly behaved as a poorly trained off leash dog, so it doesn’t really matter about the leash issue. My dogs are trained on and off leash so it is no issue use us. But while we are walking them on leashes there are TONS of poorly trained LEASHED dogs that snarl and pull and go nuts whenever other dogs walk by. I want to tell them to either train their dog or keep it home or walk it where there are no other dogs. 

    ETA: I should also point out that pretty much EVERYONE where I live in the mountains has invisible fences because it is way too expensive to fence in all their property. 

    Post # 53
    Member
    3195 posts
    Sugar bee

    View original reply
    @Wonderstruck:  Right, but the end of my example was tying it in to the OP being in an off leash area. She took all the necessary precautions in training her dog and ensuring that she was in an off-leash area before taking her dog out. And I was using those examples in response to another poster who said that they didn’t ever want another unleashed dog around them/their dog regardless of the situation. So my examples correspond perfectly with this situation. The point being that there are dangerous situations all around us and we take the necessary steps to stop things from happening, but things still happen anyway despite our best intentions. And if the other person had taken the right precautionary steps by training her dog (or using blinkers/looking for people in crosswalks/wearing snow boots) we probably wouldn’t be here talking about it.

    Post # 54
    Member
    1066 posts
    Bumble bee

    Pfft She is making excuses for her dogs behaviour…You were in an area where dogs could run free and if your dog did nothing well really it made hers look really bad LOL…The good thing is your dog is not hurt…

    Post # 55
    Member
    4800 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: September 2011

    View original reply
    @fvsoccer:  That is true. I’m sorry, I’ve just had so many bad situations with trained unleashed dogs that I get emotional about the topic kind of easily. I missed the part of your message about it being an off-leash area (which I do agree that is an exception, it certainly makes a difference) and zoned right in on the rest of it and misinterpreted a bit.

    Post # 56
    Member
    3195 posts
    Sugar bee

    View original reply
    @Stargaze31:  I agree completely with this. Also, sometimes the invisible fences are more effective than physical fences! I also sometimes wonder whether leashes just give people excuses to NOT train their dogs. They think they have the dog under control because they have a 6′ bit of nylon strapped to their dog and don’t bother to teach them obedience/socialize them. It drives me nuts that people think leashes are the solution to controlling dogs. 

    Post # 57
    Member
    3195 posts
    Sugar bee

    View original reply
    @Wonderstruck:  Hehe no problem. I’ve had some truly awful experiences with my dogs being attacked by other dogs (and our rescue attacking family dogs…we ended up having to put her down because she didn’t respond enough to intensive training where we were comfortable with keeping/rehoming her) and know how frustrating/terrifying it can be for people to not train their dogs or keep positive control over them. 

    Post # 58
    Member
    4654 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: August 2013

    If there’s a sign that says you’re allowed explicitly to have voice-controlled dogs off leash, I think that puts paid to it. 

    PERSONALLY I love a well-behaved dog off leash and if they greet me politely, am delighted to interact with them. Dogs are awesome. In a perfect world, everyone would train their dogs and leashes would not be required, just a preference thing.

    However, I understand that other people don’t agree, and think that in most places, dogs should be leashed. It’s a bit sad but kind of necessary.

    But if there’s a location that explicitly allows off-leash dogs like a trail with a sign or a dog-friendly park, obviously anyone who tells you to leash them is in the wrong. You were clearly right here. She blamed you out of fear you’d take action against her because of the bite, which is wrong. 

    Post # 59
    Member
    15196 posts
    Honey Beekeeper
    • Wedding: June 2011

    I’m perfectly fine with unleashed well behaved dogs.  While we were in Italy a few months ago, I was actually shocked that most dogs were off leash everywhere!  And they were so well behaved, just following along the owners side ignoring everything else.  Or if they stop to sniff a little, they’d catch right up.  I’d prefer well behaved dogs off leash to even aggreesive ones on leash anyday.  If my dog decided to go after another dog, even on leash, there’s no way I’m stopping a 100+ lbs dog.

    Post # 60
    Member
    649 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: October 2014

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    @bunnyharriet:  I know of several public parks that allow dogs off leash if under control, especially if they have hiking trails and what not. 

    Post # 61
    Member
    1676 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: June 2011

    My two poodles are always leashed unless we’re in a closed off area where no dogs or other people can get to them unless it’s purposeful. They get to run free, but only when I know we won’t have unwanted encounters like this. My dogs are very well-trained, but I keep them leashed to protect them from other dogs. It’s a lot easier for me to step between them and a dog like this one if I can use the leash position us. 

    As for other’s dogs being off the leash, I don’t really like it. Some are very well-trained like you described, but others are not. Unfortunately, you can’t effectively enforce a “your dog can be unleashed as long as it’s not a menace” policy because everyone thinks their dog is precious. 

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