(Closed) UK vs US baby names

posted 5 years ago in Babies
Post # 61
Member
269 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

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Cory_loves_this_girl:  this is confusing as I pronounce lor and law the same! I’m English…

Post # 62
Member
269 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

I’m from the UK and I find names which to me are surnames really odd – such as Carter, Mason, Bentley, McKenzie, Cooper etc. To me they sound a bit silly. 

We definitely go for tradition over here, in my family we have a Catherine, William, Elizabeth, Lucy, Peter, Andrew, Josephine and a Charles. Never really thought how traditional that is til I read this!! 

Some friends I know have kids names Sonny, Layton and Taylor – so the times are changing (though personally Taylor is my least favourite name. Why?!)

Post # 63
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2121 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: December 2017

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Westwood:  People are allowed to be opinionated on names without being offensive. 

Post # 64
Member
2121 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: December 2017

Lots of American names sound silly and made up to me. Struggling to think of examples as they pretty much slip out of my mind right away.

And I say Craig with an “ay” rather than a “eh”.

Ciara annoys me a lot. It’s Keira (Keer-aa), not Sierra.

Post # 65
Member
258 posts
Helper bee

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MsElle:  Angus is a very Scottish name and very traditional it goes back to the clans that Scotland was divided into.  My dad’s name is Angus and has been passed down since then. It is making a come back as it’s quite cute now. I do still feel it is old fashioned though so I’m giving my son Angus as a middle name to honour tradition and my dad but also I get to choose a more modern name for a first name. 

 

I always assumed Isla was American I only heard of Isla Fisher the actress and I thought she was American. 

Post # 66
Member
59 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: February 2016

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nearlymrshill:  I was talking about this to my SO, who is English. I was really emphasizing the two different pronunciations and he could not hear the difference. He was so confused.

I definitely say “Creg” but I’m from New England. No Southern twang here at all!

Post # 67
Member
427 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2016

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Carritas27:  yes I knew it was very Scottisj, but when I lived in England and taught, I still met children with that name, whereas where I live now  and teach I have never seen it. 

Post # 68
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2514 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2015

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YogaMama:  
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MsElle:  Any chance you guys are from out west?  I went to university with a Craig.  Those from AB, BC said it like ‘beg/leg’ like a short e sound.  Those of us from ON and east said it like “cray-ig” with a long a sound.  (We didn’t have anyone from the praries, so I can’t include them.)  

Post # 69
Member
1382 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

I don’t think it’s silly, but I was caught off guard when I first heard British people using the name Jemima. There is some racist history of that name in the states so its basically never used anymore, but I don’t think that our history reflects at all on the British use of the name. 

I tend to prefer the names popular in Britain, as I like classic names outside of the top 10 or 20. It seems in the US there are the super common names and then really trendy names. And it seems like as the trend for girl names got more masculine, trendy boy names became hyper-masculine to a point I find kind of insane. 

I love Shakespearean girl names and really like Imogen, but it’s much more popular over there. I sometimes worry it would come off as overly precious being so rare in the states. 

Post # 70
Member
119 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

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BizzzzyBee:  I’m an American living in the UK and there are many I could mention that I find ridiculous on both sides of the ocean. However, the one that ALWAYS strikes me as very odd and, truthfully imo boarding on offensive as a US American due to our particular cultural history, is Jemima. 

It is just…just. No. Nope. 

Post # 71
Member
119 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

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Feist:  oh! You got there first. Cheers!

Post # 72
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927 posts
Busy bee

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Carritas27:  Isla Fisher is from Australia, but looking at her wikipedia page it seems her parents are Scottish

Post # 73
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927 posts
Busy bee

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Badatusernames:  I had no idea what Jemima was to the US (have googled and learned a little about Aunt Jemima now, assuming that’s what you’re referring to). In Australia, Jemima is the name of a doll featured in a long running (spanning multiple generations) kids TV show called Play School. Other Aussie bees can chime in but I think that’s our main association with the name here. I also see from google it’s a name from the bible, but I don’t remember that from school. Something so innocuous in one country, offensive in another – I find it fascinating. 

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